PDA

View Full Version : Anyone know much about haplo W1-T119C?



hunder
04-03-16, 03:58
Hi,
I'm new to this forum. I was wanting to get an upgrade in my mother's genetic testing to hopefully shed some light on who my great grandmother was and so did that and now I'm completely lost about what the results are.

All I know was she said she was from Norway. I knew my mom was a W from the previous basic test she took some years ago. I heard that W is somewhat rare but now I'm wondering about this W1-T119C and can't find much on it. So, I'm wondering if anyone here has any insight into this haplo group?

hunder
07-03-16, 10:44
Anyone at all?

Kristiina
07-03-16, 22:01
This site is interesting! It contains a lot of information on haplogroup W: http://www.thecid.com/

Kristiina
07-03-16, 22:08
This is what they explain about W1c 119:
W1c (defined by coding region mutations 14148). This emerged around 9,000 years ago in the steppes of Eurasia. Descendent lineages are:
W1c1, with the 11204 and 12648 mutations, 7,000 years old, found in Norway, Germany, and the British Isles.
A major subgroup with the 119 mutation which emerged 8,000 years ago. Major subgroups are:
W1c with the 5004 mutation, around 2500 years old, found today in Sweden and Ireland.
W1c with the 150 mutation emerging around 8,000 years ago, found today in India.
W1c with the 16292C mutation, about 6,000 years ago, found today in India and Iran.
W1c with the 16193 and 152 mutations, about 4,000 years old, found today in Turkey and Bulgaria.

There are various lineages coming directly from W1c with only single samples, found today in Ireland, Denmark, France, Iran, and Georgia.

There are various lineages coming from W1c+119 with single samples, found today in Italy, Britain, and Norway.

hunder
09-05-16, 08:55
This is what they explain about W1c 119:
W1c (defined by coding region mutations 14148). This emerged around 9,000 years ago in the steppes of Eurasia. Descendent lineages are:
W1c1, with the 11204 and 12648 mutations, 7,000 years old, found in Norway, Germany, and the British Isles.
A major subgroup with the 119 mutation which emerged 8,000 years ago. Major subgroups are:
W1c with the 5004 mutation, around 2500 years old, found today in Sweden and Ireland.
W1c with the 150 mutation emerging around 8,000 years ago, found today in India.
W1c with the 16292C mutation, about 6,000 years ago, found today in India and Iran.
W1c with the 16193 and 152 mutations, about 4,000 years old, found today in Turkey and Bulgaria.

There are various lineages coming directly from W1c with only single samples, found today in Ireland, Denmark, France, Iran, and Georgia.

There are various lineages coming from W1c+119 with single samples, found today in Italy, Britain, and Norway.

THANK YOU very much!

MatsCarlin
01-08-18, 20:52
In the W&N2a mtDNA project at FTDNA, we have noticed that T119C is not a stable marker of all haplogroups. In W1c as one example, almost half of the members lack this mutation, even though it is probably ancient and ancestral to W1c. We are therefor currently handling most kits within W1 and W1+T119C as belonging to the same haplogroup, not two different branches. W1 is the largest haplogroup under W with a wealth of subbranches. Without the full sequence results, you cannot know your placement under W1. There is also a number of ancient W1, most of them T119C positive. The five oldest samples shows a clear trail from Anatolia more than 8.000 years ago into Europe (Hungary, Germany & Scotland) during the Neolithic.