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View Full Version : Large Scale LN/BA Replacement in All of Europe



Fire Haired14
12-03-16, 04:34
Late Neolithic/Bronze age Ancestors of Europeans (https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1RNn1pmYeHcSvFJj-5d38c6810KbssAXweZFnzZOwFjI/edit#gid=670286796)
I'm 99.999999999999% confident that the people who lived in every inch of land in Europe in 3000 BC are not the main ancestors of people living in their land today. The only exception is Sardinia. Post-3000 BC population replacement in Europe was just as large as Neolithic population replacement. The people who migrated into/within Europe after 3000 BC, where from North or East Europe, Near East, NorthWest Africa, and Siberia.

At first people thought Europeans are full descended of the first humans to arrive in Europe 40,000 years ago. Then, they thought Europeans are a mixture of the first humans to arrive and Neolithic immigrants from the Near East. Then, people thought Europeans are a mixture of first humans to arrive in Europe, Neolithic immigrants from the Near East, and Bronze age immigrants from the Eurasian Steppe. Now, I know(maybe not anyone mainstream), Europe also faced large migrations from the Near East, North Africa, and Siberia in the Bronze or Iron age or Middle Ages.

The WHG-EEF-ANE, Northern Europe=hunter gatherers, Southern Europe-farmers, needs to be forgotten. Steppe, Neolithic Turkey, and Bronze age Middle East are the most important things to remember about European origins. WHG is a minor part of ancestry for all Europeans. It did survive best in the East Baltic, but still only around 20% of their ancestry is WHG, and most of that WHG isn't even from the Baltic.

Twilight
12-03-16, 06:37
Late Neolithic/Bronze age Ancestors of Europeans (https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1RNn1pmYeHcSvFJj-5d38c6810KbssAXweZFnzZOwFjI/edit#gid=670286796)
I'm 99.999999999999% confident that the people who lived in every inch of land in Europe in 3000 BC are not the main ancestors of people living in their land today. The only exception is Sardinia. Post-3000 BC population replacement in Europe was just as large as Neolithic population replacement. The people who migrated into/within Europe after 3000 BC, where from North or East Europe, Near East, NorthWest Africa, and Siberia.

At first people thought Europeans are full descended of the first humans to arrive in Europe 40,000 years ago. Then, they thought Europeans are a mixture of the first humans to arrive and Neolithic immigrants from the Near East. Then, people thought Europeans are a mixture of first humans to arrive in Europe, Neolithic immigrants from the Near East, and Bronze age immigrants from the Eurasian Steppe. Now, I know(maybe not anyone mainstream), Europe also faced large migrations from the Near East, North Africa, and Siberia in the Bronze or Iron age or Middle Ages.

The WHG-EEF-ANE, Northern Europe=hunter gatherers, Southern Europe-farmers, needs to be forgotten. Steppe, Neolithic Turkey, and Bronze age Middle East are the most important things to remember about European origins. WHG is a minor part of ancestry for all Europeans. It did survive best in the East Baltic, but still only around 20% of their ancestry is WHG, and most of that WHG isn't even from the Baltic.

Of cource not, totally agree. Even in the Dark ages the Steepes were still migrating to Europe; Alan's/Scythians. Not to mention the Moors settling in Spain. Ancient civilizations tended to migrate a lot. :)

Sennevini
13-03-16, 14:12
After those replacements, a lot of diffusion took place too. In my Dutch pedigree, a lot of Germans appear, all over the place, from all over Germany. If I go back to 1800, I only find one German, but going back to 1700, I am already 6% German, and if I go back to 1600, I am almost 10% German, and since I don't know all of my ancestors from 1600, this number could be even higher. Apparently there was a continous immigration of Germans to Hollandic lands. Who says, maybe if I go back to 1000AD I might be a quarter German,
which would be a lot more than I thought; and though the Dutch and Germans resemble each other, it forces me to think about where I actually come from.

Tomenable
13-03-16, 14:40
Apparently there was a continous immigration of Germans to Hollandic lands.

There was also emigration from Hollandic lands to other parts of Germany and West Slavic lands, for example:

http://www.feudalismus.de/bauern.JPG

Not to mention the later "Hollanders" ("Olędrzy" in Polish), who settled in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olędrzy

I have some distant "Olędrzy" ancestor, but in my maternal side (surname: Meller - I think it is Low German).

Sennevini
13-03-16, 15:15
There was also emigration from Hollandic lands to other parts of Germany and West Slavic lands

O yes, forgot about that. Those Germans in my pedigree could have been partly "Dutch" themselves...

gyms
13-03-16, 16:02
The Eurasian nomads were a large group of nomadic (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nomad) peoples from the Eurasian Steppe (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasian_Steppe), who often appear in history as invaders of Europe (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Europe), the Middle East (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Middle_East) and China (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/China).[

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasian_nomads