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View Full Version : Genetic Heritage of Croatians. New paper



Maleth
13-07-16, 22:16
DiscussionThe analyses of the dominant and autochthonous I2a1b-M423 lineage (>30%) suggest that SEE had a significant role in the Upper Paleolithic, the R1a1a1b1a*-M558 lineage (19%) represents a signal from present day Slavic populations of Central Europe in the Croatian population, and the phylogeography of the E1b1b1a1b1a-V13 clade (around 9%) implies cultural diffusion of agriculture into Europe via the Balkan Peninsula. Am. J. Hum. Biol., 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajhb.22876/abstract

Garrick
14-07-16, 00:24
Discussion

The analyses of the dominant and autochthonous I2a1b-M423 lineage (>30%) suggest that SEE had a significant role in the Upper Paleolithic, the R1a1a1b1a*-M558 lineage (19%) represents a signal from present day Slavic populations of Central Europe in the Croatian population, and the phylogeography of the E1b1b1a1b1a-V13 clade (around 9%) implies cultural diffusion of agriculture into Europe via the Balkan Peninsula. Am. J. Hum. Biol., 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajhb.22876/abstract



Expected.

M217 (C3) -> 0.3

YAP (E) -> 10.2 (V13-> 9.8)

P15 (G2a) -> 4.4 (L497 (G2a3b1c) -> 2.0)

M253 (I1) -> 4.1

M438 -> 35.0 (M423 (I2a2) -> 32.5)

M267 (J1) -> 0.5

M12 (J2b) -> 5.0

M410 (J2a) -> 3.7

M231 (N) -> 0.6

M70 (T) -> 1.2

M242 (Q) -> 0.9

M45 (P*) -> 0.1

Z282 (R1a) -> 25.6

M269 (R1b*) -> 0.1

R1b -> 8.4 (L23 -> 4.1; M412 -> 0.3; U106 -> 0.9; U152 -> 1.5; S116 -> 1.3; M529 -> 0.2)

...
These data are similar as at Serbs, it show that Serbs and Croats according Y-DNA haplogroup have no big differences.

A. Papadimitriou
14-07-16, 01:09
Discussion

The analyses of the dominant and autochthonous I2a1b-M423 lineage (>30%) suggest that SEE had a significant role in the Upper Paleolithic, the R1a1a1b1a*-M558 lineage (19%) represents a signal from present day Slavic populations of Central Europe in the Croatian population, and the phylogeography of the E1b1b1a1b1a-V13 clade (around 9%) implies cultural diffusion of agriculture into Europe via the Balkan Peninsula. Am. J. Hum. Biol., 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajhb.22876/abstract


What makes I2a1b-M423 indigenous?

Angela
14-07-16, 03:00
What makes I2a1b-M423 indigenous?

I only skimmed it, so maybe if I find time to read it tomorrow I'll find some proof, but so far it just seems like a bald assertion.

Garrick
14-07-16, 04:07
What makes I2a1b-M423 indigenous?

According to authors:

(quote)
The elevated frequency and high diversity of I2a1b-M423 lineages among different SEE populations shows a genetic signature of their common paternal history over a long period of time. The PCA plot clearly shows a SEE cluster comprised of Bosnian and Herzegovinian, Serbian and Croatian samples based predominantly on the I2a1b-M423 component. As shown in the I2a1b-M423 spatial gradient map, a clear cline of this clade is evident inside Europe, spreading from the area of Southern Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina mostly northward and eastward. Although the initial STR-based time estimate for this clade gave support for a Upper Paleolithic origin (Pericˇic´ et al., 2005), new studies based on whole Y chromosome sequencing suggest a somewhat younger age of this clade, between 5 and 7.5 kya (Batini et al., 2015; Karmin et al., 2015). In addition, the high haplotype diversity of this lineage in Croatia reveals its significant expansion only after the adoption of agriculture by Mesolithic hunter-gatherers in SEE (Battaglia et al., 2009).

More evidence of its autochthonous European origin also came recently from European aDNA studies. Lazaridis et al. (2014) sequenced nine ancient genomes (with age estimates of cca 8 kya) and analyzed the complete NRY sequence of five male individuals (one from Luxemburg and four from Sweden). Their results showed all five of them belonged to the I haplogroup. The authors warned that, at present, the limited number of ancient samples for which Y chromosome data are available makes it difficult to assess how statistically surprising it is that this NRY haplogroup occurs in all five of the ancient Mesolithic males but in only a quarter of present-day males from that geographic area. They appear to argue that the haplogroup I today is found in a wider European area at a 6 J. SARAC ET AL. American Journal of Human Biology much lower frequency than it occurred around 8 kya. This haplogroup has also been found and described in a Scandinavian Neolithic hunter-gatherer from Sweden (Skoglund et al., 2014), as well as in Neolithic remains from southern France and northern Spain (Lacan et al., 2011a). The fact that a significant portion of investigated Mesolithic males belonged to haplogroup I suggests that this paternal lineage might represent a major pre-Neolithic European clade, and the results obtained in this study support this hypothesis.
(end of quote)

LeBrok
14-07-16, 04:51
According to authors:

(quote)
The elevated frequency and high diversity of I2a1b-M423 lineages among different SEE populations shows a genetic signature of their common paternal history over a long period of time. The PCA plot clearly shows a SEE cluster comprised of Bosnian and Herzegovinian, Serbian and Croatian samples based predominantly on the I2a1b-M423 component. As shown in the I2a1b-M423 spatial gradient map, a clear cline of this clade is evident inside Europe, spreading from the area of Southern Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina mostly northward and eastward. Although the initial STR-based time estimate for this clade gave support for a Upper Paleolithic origin (Pericˇic´ et al., 2005), new studies based on whole Y chromosome sequencing suggest a somewhat younger age of this clade, between 5 and 7.5 kya (Batini et al., 2015; Karmin et al., 2015). In addition, the high haplotype diversity of this lineage in Croatia reveals its significant expansion only after the adoption of agriculture by Mesolithic hunter-gatherers in SEE (Battaglia et al., 2009).
Wow, did they miss all the Neolithic Farmer expansion from last few papers?!



More evidence of its autochthonous European origin also came recently from European aDNA studies. Lazaridis et al. (2014) sequenced nine ancient genomes (with age estimates of cca 8 kya) and analyzed the complete NRY sequence of five male individuals (one from Luxemburg and four from Sweden). Their results showed all five of them belonged to the I haplogroup. The authors warned that, at present, the limited number of ancient samples for which Y chromosome data are available makes it difficult to assess how statistically surprising it is that this NRY haplogroup occurs in all five of the ancient Mesolithic males but in only a quarter of present-day males from that geographic area. They appear to argue that the haplogroup I today is found in a wider European area at a 6 J. SARAC ET AL. American Journal of Human Biology much lower frequency than it occurred around 8 kya. This haplogroup has also been found and described in a Scandinavian Neolithic hunter-gatherer from Sweden (Skoglund et al., 2014), as well as in Neolithic remains from southern France and northern Spain (Lacan et al., 2011a). The fact that a significant portion of investigated Mesolithic males belonged to haplogroup I suggests that this paternal lineage might represent a major pre-Neolithic European clade, and the results obtained in this study support this hypothesis.
(end of quote)
Wow, groundbreaking insights, lol.

Why do they spend hundreds of thousands of dollars for guessing and don't sequester more ancient genome! For the same amount of money we would have known for sure how it went.

Sile
14-07-16, 08:05
According to authors:

(quote)
The elevated frequency and high diversity of I2a1b-M423 lineages among different SEE populations shows a genetic signature of their common paternal history over a long period of time. The PCA plot clearly shows a SEE cluster comprised of Bosnian and Herzegovinian, Serbian and Croatian samples based predominantly on the I2a1b-M423 component. As shown in the I2a1b-M423 spatial gradient map, a clear cline of this clade is evident inside Europe, spreading from the area of Southern Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina mostly northward and eastward. Although the initial STR-based time estimate for this clade gave support for a Upper Paleolithic origin (Pericˇic´ et al., 2005), new studies based on whole Y chromosome sequencing suggest a somewhat younger age of this clade, between 5 and 7.5 kya (Batini et al., 2015; Karmin et al., 2015). In addition, the high haplotype diversity of this lineage in Croatia reveals its significant expansion only after the adoption of agriculture by Mesolithic hunter-gatherers in SEE (Battaglia et al., 2009).

More evidence of its autochthonous European origin also came recently from European aDNA studies. Lazaridis et al. (2014) sequenced nine ancient genomes (with age estimates of cca 8 kya) and analyzed the complete NRY sequence of five male individuals (one from Luxemburg and four from Sweden). Their results showed all five of them belonged to the I haplogroup. The authors warned that, at present, the limited number of ancient samples for which Y chromosome data are available makes it difficult to assess how statistically surprising it is that this NRY haplogroup occurs in all five of the ancient Mesolithic males but in only a quarter of present-day males from that geographic area. They appear to argue that the haplogroup I today is found in a wider European area at a 6 J. SARAC ET AL. American Journal of Human Biology much lower frequency than it occurred around 8 kya. This haplogroup has also been found and described in a Scandinavian Neolithic hunter-gatherer from Sweden (Skoglund et al., 2014), as well as in Neolithic remains from southern France and northern Spain (Lacan et al., 2011a). The fact that a significant portion of investigated Mesolithic males belonged to haplogroup I suggests that this paternal lineage might represent a major pre-Neolithic European clade, and the results obtained in this study support this hypothesis.
(end of quote)

Is this I2a marker similar to the Ancient Remedello samples of I2a ?????

Sile
14-07-16, 08:27
An interesting paper only concentrating mainly on I2a , R1a and E-V13 markers

As for my haplogroup marker, they are from

4 from Mali Losinj, Croatia .........an Island ....................Liburnians? ( illyrians )

3 from Dubrovnik .................................................. ..Dalmatians? ( illyrians )

1 from Zarda .................................................. ......Dalmatians? ( illyrians )

All coastal areas of Croatia

A. Papadimitriou
14-07-16, 16:34
According to authors:

(quote)
The elevated frequency and high diversity of I2a1b-M423 lineages among different SEE populations shows a genetic signature of their common paternal history over a long period of time. The PCA plot clearly shows a SEE cluster comprised of Bosnian and Herzegovinian, Serbian and Croatian samples based predominantly on the I2a1b-M423 component. As shown in the I2a1b-M423 spatial gradient map, a clear cline of this clade is evident inside Europe, spreading from the area of Southern Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina mostly northward and eastward. Although the initial STR-based time estimate for this clade gave support for a Upper Paleolithic origin (Pericˇic´ et al., 2005), new studies based on whole Y chromosome sequencing suggest a somewhat younger age of this clade, between 5 and 7.5 kya (Batini et al., 2015; Karmin et al., 2015). In addition, the high haplotype diversity of this lineage in Croatia reveals its significant expansion only after the adoption of agriculture by Mesolithic hunter-gatherers in SEE (Battaglia et al., 2009).

More evidence of its autochthonous European origin also came recently from European aDNA studies. Lazaridis et al. (2014) sequenced nine ancient genomes (with age estimates of cca 8 kya) and analyzed the complete NRY sequence of five male individuals (one from Luxemburg and four from Sweden). Their results showed all five of them belonged to the I haplogroup. The authors warned that, at present, the limited number of ancient samples for which Y chromosome data are available makes it difficult to assess how statistically surprising it is that this NRY haplogroup occurs in all five of the ancient Mesolithic males but in only a quarter of present-day males from that geographic area. They appear to argue that the haplogroup I today is found in a wider European area at a 6 J. SARAC ET AL. American Journal of Human Biology much lower frequency than it occurred around 8 kya. This haplogroup has also been found and described in a Scandinavian Neolithic hunter-gatherer from Sweden (Skoglund et al., 2014), as well as in Neolithic remains from southern France and northern Spain (Lacan et al., 2011a). The fact that a significant portion of investigated Mesolithic males belonged to haplogroup I suggests that this paternal lineage might represent a major pre-Neolithic European clade, and the results obtained in this study support this hypothesis.
(end of quote)

So, they say that it is 'autochtonous European', not 'autochthonous' in Western Balkans.

Dinarid
15-07-16, 08:28
Supposedly the original Croats were from around the Slavic homeland at the border of Central and Eastern Europe. It is likely that in addition to R1a they also brought some men with Haplogroup I2a1 due to the amount of western Ukrainians with that haplogroup, although ultimately I believe it is native to the Balkans.

Apsurdistan
20-04-17, 21:45
Assigning only one haplogroup to a language or tribe or ethnicity always annoys me cuz its too simplistic and unrealistic. How come the Balts and Estonians have majority R1a they don't speak slavic, Hungarians too even have almost no N1 they don't speak slavic. How come even Turkic people like Kyrgyzstan have majority R1a, don't speak Slavic. Yet every time you read these things they always associate R1a like it's the only Slavic language hg.

LeBrok
21-04-17, 03:01
Assigning only one haplogroup to a language or tribe or ethnicity always annoys me cuz its too simplistic and unrealistic. How come the Balts and Estonians have majority R1a they don't speak slavic, Hungarians too even have almost no N1 they don't speak slavic. How come even Turkic people like Kyrgyzstan have majority R1a, don't speak Slavic. Yet every time you read these things they always associate R1a like it's the only Slavic language hg.
Pay attention. First post talks about subclades of haplogroups and not about general haplogroups.