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Angela
21-07-16, 16:13
See:
http://www.archaeology.org/news/4652-160718-poland-bronze-age-wall

"More on Bronze Age-Wall in Poland
http://www.archaeology.org/images/News/1607/Poland-Bronze-Age-Wall.jpg
MASZKOWICE, POLAND—Archaeologists studying an unusual 3,500-year-old stone wall discovered at a Bronze Age settlement in southern Poland last year have found more evidence that points to the identity of the structure's builders, reports Science & Scholarship in Poland (http://scienceinpoland.pap.pl/en/news/news,410502,we-know-more-about-the-builders-of-the-oldest-stone-wall-in-poland.html). Led by Jagiellonian University archaeologist Marcin S. Przybyla, the team believes at least some of the villagers came from the Mediterranean or Adriatic. "The closest similarities in architectural solutions can be found in the settlement situated on the peninsula of Istria in northern Croatia," says Przybyla. His team also found that while the wall protecting the settlement was built using foreign techniques, the twenty houses found inside the settlement are similar to those commonly found in the region. Constructed from ca. 1750-1690 B.C., the wall fell into disrepair after a century. Some signs of crude repair and reconstruction are apparent, but after 200 years, the site was abandoned.

See also:
http://scienceinpoland.pap.pl/en/news/news,410502,we-know-more-about-the-builders-of-the-oldest-stone-wall-in-poland.html

Anyone remember the date of that Bronze Age battle? The name escapes me at the moment. Could it have anything to do with this?

bicicleur
21-07-16, 19:00
See:
http://www.archaeology.org/news/4652-160718-poland-bronze-age-wall

"More on Bronze Age-Wall in Poland
http://www.archaeology.org/images/News/1607/Poland-Bronze-Age-Wall.jpg
MASZKOWICE, POLAND—Archaeologists studying an unusual 3,500-year-old stone wall discovered at a Bronze Age settlement in southern Poland last year have found more evidence that points to the identity of the structure's builders, reports Science & Scholarship in Poland (http://scienceinpoland.pap.pl/en/news/news,410502,we-know-more-about-the-builders-of-the-oldest-stone-wall-in-poland.html). Led by Jagiellonian University archaeologist Marcin S. Przybyla, the team believes at least some of the villagers came from the Mediterranean or Adriatic. "The closest similarities in architectural solutions can be found in the settlement situated on the peninsula of Istria in northern Croatia," says Przybyla. His team also found that while the wall protecting the settlement was built using foreign techniques, the twenty houses found inside the settlement are similar to those commonly found in the region. Constructed from ca. 1750-1690 B.C., the wall fell into disrepair after a century. Some signs of crude repair and reconstruction are apparent, but after 200 years, the site was abandoned.

See also:
http://scienceinpoland.pap.pl/en/news/news,410502,we-know-more-about-the-builders-of-the-oldest-stone-wall-in-poland.html

Anyone remember the date of that Bronze Age battle? The name escapes me at the moment. Could it have anything to do with this?

The Bronze Age Battle near the Tollense river was ca 1250 BC.
Ca 3.7 ka Catacomb R1b people were ousted of the Pontice steppe by Srubnaya R1a-Z93 people.
They brought charriots and swords to the Carpathian steppe, the same gear the Mycenians had when they arrived a bit later in Greece.
I wouldn't be surprised if these people built such a wall in southern Poland.

The trade between the Carpathian Basin and the Baltic was in the hands of the Unetice people and their heirs the Tumulus people.
Those newcomers took over. Ca 3.3 ka they expanded as Urnfield people.
The Tolllense Battle was along the road southbound from the Baltic Sea.
There were warriors coming from the south fighting warriors from Poland, northern Germany and Scandinavia.

LeBrok
22-07-16, 04:10
The Bronze Age Battle near the Tollense river was ca 1250 BC.
Ca 3.7 ka Catacomb R1b people were ousted of the Pontice steppe by Srubnaya R1a-Z93 people.
They brought charriots and swords to the Carpathian steppe, the same gear the Mycenians had when they arrived a bit later in Greece.
I wouldn't be surprised if these people built such a wall in southern Poland.It is very possible that R1b folks Mycenaeans and Macedonians were squeezed out of the Steppe into Balkans. This find is in very south Poland, so close to their suppose rout to Balkans.