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Dominicanese
17-09-16, 23:01
Jamaica.

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Culture:
Jamaican culture is the religion, norms, values and lifestyle that defines the people of Jamaica. The culture is mixed, with an ethnically diverse society, stemming from a history of inhabitants beginning with the original Taino people. The Taino people were enslaved by the Spanish, who were then overthrown by the British, who brought Africans to Jamaica to be enslaved and work on the plantations. Black slaves became the dominant cultural force as they suffered and resisted the harsh conditions of forced labour. After the abolition of slavery, Chinese and Indian migrants were transported to the island as indentured workers, bringing with them ideas from the Far East. These contributions resulted in a diversity that affected the language, music, dance, religion and social norms and practices of the Jamaican people.

Cuisine:
Jamaican cuisine includes a mixture of cooking techniques, flavours, spices and influences from the indigenous people on the island of Jamaica, and the Spanish, British, Africans, Indian and Chinese who have inhabited the island. It is also influenced by the crops introduced into the island from tropical Southeast Asia. Jamaican cuisine includes various dishes from the different cultures brought to the island with the arrival of people from elsewhere. Other dishes are novel or a fusion of techniques and traditions. In addition to ingredients that are native to Jamaica, many foods have been introduced and are now grown locally. A wide variety of seafood, tropical fruits and meats are available.
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Some Jamaican cuisine dishes are variations on the cuisines and cooking styles brought to the island from elsewhere. These are often modified to incorporate local produce. Others are novel and have developed locally. Popular Jamaican dishes include curry goat, fried dumplings, ackee and saltfish (cod) – the national dish of Jamaica – fried plantain, "jerk", steamed cabbage and "rice and peas" (pigeon peas or kidney beans). Jamaican cuisine has been adapted by African, Indian, British, French, Spanish, Chinese influences. Jamaican patties and various pastries and breads are also popular as well as fruit beverages and Jamaican rum.
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Jamaican cuisine has spread with emigrations, especially during the 20th century, from the island to other nations as Jamaicans have sought economic opportunities in other areas.
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Jamaican cuisine is available throughout North America, the United Kingdom, and other places with a sizeable Jamaican population. In the United States, a large number of restaurants are located throughout New York's boroughs, Atlanta, Fort Lauderdale, Washington DC, Philadelphia, and other metropolitan areas. In Canada, Jamaican restaurants can be found in the Toronto metropolitan area, as well as Vancouver, Montreal, and Ottawa. Jamaican dishes are also featured on the menus of Bahama Breeze, a US-based restaurant chain owned by Darden Restaurants.
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Golden Krust Caribbean Bakery & Grill is a chain of about 120 franchised restaurants found throughout the U.S. These restaurants sell Jamaican patties, buns, breads, and dinner and lunch dishes. They also supply food to several institutions in New York.
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In 2001 Port Royal started manufacturing authentic style Jamaican Patties in London and are available in Tesco, Asda, Morrissons and Caribbean takeaways across UK. A Patty is the Caribbean version of a Cornish Pasty, pastry with a meat filling.

Music:
The music of Jamaica includes Jamaican folk music and many popular genres, such as mento, ska, rocksteady, reggae, dub music, dancehall, ska jazz, reggae fusion and related styles. Jamaica's music culture is a fusion of elements from neighboring Caribbean islands such as Trinidad and Tobago (calypso and soca).
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Reggae is especially popular through the international fame of Bob Marley. Jamaican music's influence on music styles in other countries includes the practice of toasting, which was brought to New York City and evolved into rapping. British genres such as Lovers rock, jungle music and grime are also influenced by Jamaican music.

Ethnic Racial Composition:
* 91.4% Black & Mulatto (There is also some East Indian, Chinese, and Native American ancestry)
* 4.4% White
* 3.4% Asian (East Indian & Chinese)
* 0.8% Others

People:
Jamaicans are the citizens of Jamaica and their descendants in the Jamaican diaspora. Most Jamaicans are of African descent, with smaller minorities of Europeans, East Indians, Chinese, Mixed-Race, and others. The bulk of the Jamaican diaspora resides in Canada, United States, Panama and the United Kingdom and in the other Anglophone countries.
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Many Jamaicans now live overseas and outside Jamaica, while many have migrated to Anglophone countries, including over 150,000 Jamaicans in the United Kingdom, over 250,000 Canada, over a million in the United States.

Languages:
The official language of Jamaica is English. They also speak a local dialect in informal situations and it is known globally and locally as "Patois" or "Jamaican English". Jamaican English has it's roots in Hiberno English spoken in Southern Ireland and British English with influences from Scottish and West African languages. They also use Arawakan words everyday locally.

Religion:
According to the most recent census (2001), religious affiliation in Jamaica consists of 64% Christian (62% Protestant and 2% Roman Catholic), 2% Jehovah's Witnesses, 3% unstated, and 10% other. The category other includes 29,026 Rastafarians, an estimated 5,000 Muslims, 3,000 Buddhists 1,453 Hindus, approximately 350 Jews. The census reported 21% who claimed no religious affiliation.

Sports:
Sport in Jamaica is a significant part of Jamaican culture. The most popular sports are mostly imported from Britain. The most popular sport is athletics; other popular sports include association football, cricket, basketball and netball (usually for women).

Out of all the top five sports, basketball is the island's fastest growing sport.

Other sports such as rugby league and rugby union are also considered growing sports.

Jamaican videos
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4sIEUmmTn0k
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