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View Full Version : Domestication can trigger complexity - Prehistoric Languages… and Prehistoric Minds



FBS
25-11-16, 15:10
Interesting topic and view, seems plausible. Burraco will continue to post on this topic but it looks interesting for a start.

This is quite intriguing:
" Interestingly, most of the domesticated mammals share a set of common traits, like reduced brains, changes in the orofacial region, or a less aggressive behaviour. Intriguingly, when we compare modern humans with extinct hominins like Neanderthals we find that many of these domesticated traits are present in our species and absent in them. Darwin himself wrote about human beings as domesticated primates in his book The Descent of Man."

Interestingly, domestication or "self-domestication" helps in triggering complexity both in language and other traits.

Part 1: https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-biolinguistic-turn/201611/prehistoric-languages-and-prehistoric-minds-part-1
Part 2: https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-biolinguistic-turn/201611/prehistoric-languages-and-prehistoric-minds-part-ii

LeBrok
25-11-16, 18:14
Interesting topic and view, seems plausible. Burraco will continue to post on this topic but it looks interesting for a start.

This is quite intriguing:
" Interestingly, most of the domesticated mammals share a set of common traits, like reduced brains, changes in the orofacial region, or a less aggressive behaviour. Intriguingly, when we compare modern humans with extinct hominins like It is "no brainer", pun intended, lol. Domesticated animals don't need all their brain functions, or body functions, and they are selected by people for their useful traits. All brain or body functions are not needed as they are protected, fed and sheltered by people. You should also noticed that domesticates are much tastier and grow faster than wild cousins.




Neanderthals we find that many of these domesticated traits are present in our species and absent in them. Darwin himself wrote about human beings as domesticated primates in his book The Descent of Man."

The lawes for domesticated animals don't apply to people. If something sort of fits it is a coincidence or illusion. For example, a bit smaller brain than before doesn't matter because it can be smaller but much more efficient and smarter. It is like comparing cell phones from nineties and now. Smaller doesn't mean less powerful. How would you explain that modern people with smaller brains achieved so much more than paleolithic HS or Neanderthals with bigger brains?

What the heck "self domestication" mean? Are we producing ourselves for a slaughter and self consumption? Analogy is totally misplaced.