PDA

View Full Version : Does your Y chromosome haplogroup influence your personality?



Groninger
05-01-17, 20:17
I know very little about genetics and I don't know anything about the Y chromosome apart from the fact that it determines that you are a male. I could imagine though that different Y haplogroups, since they contain different mutations, produce different hormone levels and thus influence your personality. If that were true, you could for instance predict that men belonging to certain haplogroups are more likely to show criminal behaviour. But perhaps I'm contributing way too much influence to the Y chromosome. Can anyone more knowledgeable in this field enlighten me here?

Rethel
05-01-17, 20:42
It is simple: if you would have different Y, you would be a
totaly different person, becaaue you would have different
father, more specificly: you wouldn;t exists, so obviously
Y chromosome influenced you so deeply, that makes you,
who you are...

LeBrok
05-01-17, 21:10
I know very little about genetics and I don't know anything about the Y chromosome apart from the fact that it determines that you are a male. I could imagine though that different Y haplogroups, since they contain different mutations, produce different hormone levels and thus influence your personality. If that were true, you could for instance predict that men belonging to certain haplogroups are more likely to show criminal behaviour. But perhaps I'm contributing way too much influence to the Y chromosome. Can anyone more knowledgeable in this field enlighten me here?
We are trying to figure it out here:
http://www.eupedia.com/forum/threads/32839-Do-you-believe-that-Y-DNA-influences-looks-and-behaviour

João Soares
05-01-17, 23:51
I know very little about genetics and I don't know anything about the Y chromosome apart from the fact that it determines that you are a male. I could imagine though that different Y haplogroups, since they contain different mutations, produce different hormone levels and thus influence your personality. If that were true, you could for instance predict that men belonging to certain haplogroups are more likely to show criminal behaviour. But perhaps I'm contributing way too much influence to the Y chromosome. Can anyone more knowledgeable in this field enlighten me here?

Regarding to the association between criminal behaviour and genetics, it doesn't appear to make much sense. Any type of crime predicts conducts fictioned by men, and therefore any criminal norm is a social construct. E.g. a conduct considered a crime today may not be considered as one in the future, and vice-versa: a conduct considered a crime yesterday may not be considered as one today. That is, at least, what I can contribute to your question.

Northener
07-01-17, 13:48
moi!
welcome, Le Brok already had give the right linkages, like to no see more of you!

Expredel
10-02-17, 04:01
I think the individualism map posted on Eupedia is very interesting.

http://www.eupedia.com/images/content/individualism-map-2.gif

If we explain individualism as determined by Y haplogroup we can see R1b as moderately individualistic based on Ireland, R1a as moderately collectivistic based on Poland. N1c would have to be moderately collectivist as well based on Finland. This then would suggest that I1 is highly individualistic, with Scandinavian individualism scores being depressed due a high percentage of R1a and N1c. We can also see that regions high in E1b1b are highly collectivistic.

Another interesting map is the corruption one.

http://cache.eupedia.com/images/content/Corruption_Perception_2013.png

This shows a similar pattern.

Homicide is another statistics that is readily available.

http://www.unz.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/European-homicide-rates.jpg

N1c clearly appears to be homicidal. As most murders are committed primarily by men this could actually be significantly Y-linked. Based on Albania there might be a link with E1b1b as well. Morocco which is very high in E1b1b has a lower homicide rate than Finland however.