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Angela
14-02-17, 18:40
See: Mitogenome Diversity in Sardinians: a Genetic Window onto an Island's Past


Anna Olivieri et al
https://academic.oup.com/mbe/article/2977388/Mitogenome-Diversity-in-Sardinians-a-Genetic?searchresult=1

"Sardinians are “outliers” in the European genetic landscape and, according to paleogenomic nuclear data, the closest to early European Neolithic farmers. To learn more about their genetic ancestry, we analyzed 3,491 modern and 21 ancient mitogenomes from Sardinia. We observed that 78.4% of modern mitogenomes cluster into 89 haplogroups that most likely arose in situ. For each Sardinian-Specific Haplogroup (SSH), we also identified the upstream node in the phylogeny, from which non-Sardinian mitogenomes radiate. This provided minimum and maximum time estimates for the presence of each SSH on the island. In agreement with demographic evidence, almost all SSHs coalesce in the post-Nuragic, Nuragic and Neolithic-Copper Age periods. For some rare SSHs, however, we could not dismiss the possibility that they might have been on the island prior to the Neolithic, a scenario that would be in agreement with archeological evidence of a Mesolithic occupation of Sardinia."

I don't see the actual paper, but there is a link to the supplement.

If someone goes through the whole supplement, I guess it's possible some of the "Mesolithic" lineages were carried by Neolithic migrants to the island?

See also:
https://phys.org/news/2017-02-sardinian-dna-genetic-clues-islandand.html

"Almost 80 percent of modern Sardinian mitogenomes belong to branches that cannot be found anywhere else outside the island. Thus, they were defined as Sardinian-Specific Haplogroups (SSHs) that most likely arose in the island after its initial occupation. Almost all SSHs coalesce in the post-Nuragic, Nuragic and Neolithic-Copper Age periods. However, some rare SSHs display age estimates older than 7,800 years ago, the postulated archeologically-based starting time of the Neolithic in Sardinia."

"The most plausible candidates would include haplogroups K1a2d and U5b1i1, which together comprise almost 3 percent of modern Sardinians, and possibly others. Such a scenario would not only support archaeological evidence of a Mesolithic occupation of Sardinia, but could also suggest a dual ancestral origin of its first inhabitants. K1a2d is of Late Paleolithic Near Eastern ancestry, whereas U5b1i1 harbours deep ancestral roots in Paleolithic Western Europe."

bicicleur
14-02-17, 23:15
what archeological evidence is there for mesolithic Sardegna ?
afaik practically none for the 2000 year before the Sardegnian neolithic
it seems like the island was deserted when first farmers arrived there some 8 ka

Angela
15-02-17, 00:49
what archeological evidence is there for mesolithic Sardegna ?
afaik practically none for the 2000 year before the Sardegnian neolithic
it seems like the island was deserted when first farmers arrived there some 8 ka

See the following as to the Sardinian Mesolithic:

https://books.google.com/books?id=fw4XuEbKnQwC&pg=PA24&lpg=PA24&dq=archaeology+of+Mesolithic+in+Sardinia&source=bl&ots=rViWSdr7ka&sig=ePQmai7_xqzZm1LaJfZIngUYlX0&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjjiJCV4ZDSAhVFRiYKHSVjA_IQ6AEIKzAC#v=on epage&q=archaeology%20of%20Mesolithic%20in%20Sardinia&f=false

The following is mostly about Corsica, but Corsica and Sardinia were attached at the time:
http://users.uoa.gr/~geeraae/publications/2000-Arc32-mesolithic.pdf

I was never persuaded by Jean Manco's assertion years ago on dnaforums that these were necessarily seasonal hunting camps. I don't know how we'd know that, number one, and the second link would suggest otherwise.

MOESAN
16-02-17, 00:37
See the following as to the Sardinian Mesolithic:

https://books.google.com/books?id=fw4XuEbKnQwC&pg=PA24&lpg=PA24&dq=archaeology+of+Mesolithic+in+Sardinia&source=bl&ots=rViWSdr7ka&sig=ePQmai7_xqzZm1LaJfZIngUYlX0&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjjiJCV4ZDSAhVFRiYKHSVjA_IQ6AEIKzAC#v=on epage&q=archaeology%20of%20Mesolithic%20in%20Sardinia&f=false

The following is mostly about Corsica, but Corsica and Sardinia were attached at the time:
http://users.uoa.gr/~geeraae/publications/2000-Arc32-mesolithic.pdf

I was never persuaded by Jean Manco's assertion years ago on dnaforums that these were necessarily seasonal hunting camps. I don't know how we'd know that, number one, and the second link would suggest otherwise.

Thanks for docs - I wonder where folks find time to read all this stuff? They never have a drink? LOL
Well, OK, all that doesn't tell us the density of pop before the Neolithic, helas! Surely sparse - but by old anthropology we know some legs were left by Mesolithic people to modern Sardinians, the most in the remote part of the island -