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Orca1
23-02-17, 05:07
I just been emailed a quick summary results from Y SEQ:

results are like :

F1370 G-
M217 A-
M216 T+
etc ....

Can someone explain to me the relation between these markers and these bases ? I just asked them to identify my subclade.

Thanks

Regio X
23-02-17, 06:50
I just been emailed a quick summary results from Y SEQ:

results are like :

F1370 G-
M217 A-
M216 T+
etc ....

Can someone explain to me the relation between these markers and these bases ? I just asked them to identify my subclade.

Thanks It means that your result for F1370 is G (ancestral), then you're F1370-, that your result for M217 is A (ancestral), then you're M217-, and that your result for M216 is T (derived), then you're M216+. So you're C-M216.

Orca1
23-02-17, 07:15
Hi Regio,

What does it mean Ancestral and derived ? is A and G are ancestral and T derived ? Not sure I got this right.

I also have another two markers as T+ and V222 still processing.

Orca1
23-02-17, 07:26
By the way the last marker with T+ is Z28000, which I guess derived from v20 ? Does it mean I am C-V20 ?

Orca1
23-02-17, 07:35
I think it starts to make more sense now. I found this page below in eupedia and it tracks down the different markers of haplogrouc C from Asia through Europe and other places worldwide.



Haplogroup C (Y-DNA)Haplogroup C is an extremely old lineage thought to have appear before or soon after the first migration of Homo Sapiens outside Africa, some 70,000 years ago. Men belonging to haplogroup C would have departed from East Africa during the Ice Age and followed the coasts of Indian Ocean, settling in the Arabian peninsula, the Indian subcontinent, south-east Asia, north-east Asia and Oceania.The first group to split away was C-Z1426, which colonised the Middle East and South Asia. One branch (CTS11043) might have moved north to Central Asia, then split into two: one tribe moving west to Europe (haplogroup C-V20) while the other migrated to East Asia and survives only in Japan today (haplogroup C-M8). Haplogroup C-V20 probably represents the first migration of Homo Sapiens to Europe 45,000 years ago, and would therefore have been the first to come into contact with European Neanderthals, although Homo sapiens are likely to have interbred with Neanderthals in the Middle East before that.The second branch of C-Z1426 spread around South Asia, Southwest Asia, and Central Asia, where it is found at low frequencies nowadays (haplogroup C-M356).During that time, other C tribes continued their eastward migration to south-east Asia, where they split in four main regional clusters. The first branch colonised Indonesia, Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia (haplogroup C2-M38). A second branch would have gone south to Australia, where they became the Aborigenes (haplogroup C4-M347). Another settled in the highlands of New Guinea (haplogroup C-P55). The fourth branch went all the way up the north-east Asia (haplogroup C3-M217) and is found nowadays chiefly among the Mongols, tribes descended from the Mongols (Kalmyks, Hazaras) including Turkic people (Kazakhs, Kyrgyz, Uyghurs, Uzbeks, Tuvans, Yakuts), East Siberian tribes (Buryats, Chukchi, Itelmens, Nivkh, Tungusic peoples), Chinese (Han, Hui, Manchus, Oroqens, Tujia), Koreans and Japanese (especially the Ainus), but also among several indigenous peoples of North America, including some Na-Dené-, Algonquian-, or Siouan-speaking populations.Haplogroup C is a very rare lineage in Europe. The few Europeans who belong C either belong to the European C-V20, the Middle Eastern C-M358, or the Mongolian C3-M217. Haplogroup C3 has also been identified in one Hunnic skeleton from the Iron Age in present-day Mongolia. Its presence in Europe can therefore be linked to the Hunnic and Mongolian invasions, like haplogroup Q1a.

Regio X
23-02-17, 18:05
Hi Regio,

What does it mean Ancestral and derived ?Ancestral and derived alleles indicate variations in a single nucleotide, which can also be short insertions and deletions.
In the context you ask, I'd roughly say the ancestral allele for a certain SNP generally corresponds to its result in the root of the Y phylogenetic tree, a result virtually fixed in the related base position till the first mutation arises. This mutation originates the derived form, which may define SNPs and characterize haplogroups.
The M216, for example, points to a mutation from Cytosine to Thymine on a certain base position, and it likely happened 50000 years ago, more or less, in a man from whom you descend. So, his close ancestors had a Cytosine (ancestral), while he and his descendants, among them you, had/have a Thymine (derived) in the correspondent position. I'm not C-M216, I don't descend from that man, then I may have the ancestral allele (Cytosine) here.


is A and G are ancestral and T derived ? Not sure I got this right.

I also have another two markers as T+ and V222 still processing.It depends on the SNP. Each nucleobase can be ancestral or derived. But the mutation most common in the genome would be Cytosine to Thymine.
If you're referring to M216+, the change is right this, from C to T. However, in F1370+ the change is from G (ancestral) to C (derived). In M217+, from A (ancestral) to C (derived).
Other examples: P312+ (R-P312), C (ancestral) to A (derived). And see the Z725+ (G-Z725) -> https://www.yseq.net/product_info.php?products_id=5056


By the way the last marker with T+ is Z28000, which I guess derived from v20 ? Does it mean I am C-V20 ? Z28000 and V20 are equivalent so far. If you're C-Z28000, then you're C-V20 (or at least very, VERY likely).

Orca1
24-02-17, 01:30
Thanks a lot Regio. Much appreciated.

Regio X
24-02-17, 02:18
Thanks a lot Regio. Much appreciated.Not at all. Tell us your result for V222 when it's ready.

Orca1
04-03-17, 11:59
Not at all. Tell us your result for V222 when it's ready.

It turns out that v222 is G-, ancestral so next in process is Y11325

Regio X
04-03-17, 20:00
It turns out that v222 is G-, ancestral so next in process is Y11325An uncommon hg. It seems there are just two lineages confirmed Y11325/Z29329/Y10490 in the FTDNA C Project, and apparently none - also in YFull - V182/V86 negative for both V222 and Y11325. I'm assuming you're positive for V182. Is that right? If so, you must come out positive for Y11325, and if you don't, then you could consider yourself kind of unique in this regard. :) Y Elite (Full Genomes) or BigY (FTDNA) would be options.

Orca1
05-03-17, 17:28
An uncommon hg. It seems there are just two lineages confirmed Y11325/Z29329/Y10490 in the FTDNA C Project, and apparently none - also in YFull - V182/V86 negative for both V222 and Y11325. I'm assuming you're positive for V182. Is that right? If so, you must come out positive for Y11325, and if you don't, then you could consider yourself kind of unique in this regard. :) Y Elite (Full Genomes) or BigY (FTDNA) would be options.

The last marker tested before V222 it was Z28000 and the outcome was T+, I guess If I am not Y11325 they will test Z38888

https://www.yseq.net/product_info.php?cPath=27&products_id=28410&osCsid=f6d359f205e88cabb7be65f0081a57b7

Regio X
05-03-17, 22:05
The last marker tested before V222 it was Z28000 and the outcome was T+, I guess If I am not Y11325 they will test Z38888

https://www.yseq.net/product_info.php?cPath=27&products_id=28410&osCsid=f6d359f205e88cabb7be65f0081a57b7Ops. I thought they tested V222 because you had been confirmed as V182+. Then sure, you could be Z38888, also a rare and very interesting clade. :)

Orca1
31-03-17, 11:51
Ops. I thought they tested V222 because you had been confirmed as V182+. Then sure, you could be Z38888, also a rare and very interesting clade. :)
It tuned out I'm C-V184*.Samples withing this group were found in Spain, Poland and Ukraine.