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Cindy90
17-03-17, 10:56
Hello everyone.

I have a great interest in Ancient Science and History as well as Psychology and Philosophy. I really like Nietzsche's books. My two favorites so far are “Beyond Good and Evil” and “Thus Spoke Zarathustra”. I would like to read more of that, from different philosophers to get to know different points of view. I guess you know what I mean.

Also I'm getting more and more interested in the history of Philosophy. So I did some research online and checked out some websites classified adds like http://www.for-sale.co.uk/philosophy-history. But I simply can't decide which book(s) to pick. There are so many for sale.

I thought it's a good idea to ask for advice here. So does anybody knows some good reads on the above topic? What kind of philosophy books are you currently reading. Which ones are your favorites and why?

So any feedback is highly appreciated.

Cindy.

Angela
17-03-17, 21:44
Cindy, the standard text is Bertrand Russel's "History of Philosophy". I haven't read the whole thing for a long time, and at about 900 pages it's a daunting task. It's well and clearly written, but what you're getting is Bertrand Russel's view of these philosophies. He makes no pretense of trying to provide any kind of "neutral" analysis. That's fine with me because I'm in sympathy with a lot of his ideas, but it has to be kept in mind.

I haven't read "A Little History of Philosophy" by Nigel Warburton, but it seems more accessible.

I have other books on philosophy on my shelves, following my changing opinions over the years. These might not at all appeal to you, however. I'm not a Nietzsche fan.

Marcus Aurelius: Meditations

Being and Time: Martin Heidegger

Myth of Sisyphus: Albert Camus

Existentialism and Humanism:John Paul Sartre


Reinhold Niebuhr: The Nature and Destiny of Man

In Defense of Secular Humanism: Paul Kurtz

This book meant a lot to me at one time:
Man's Search for Meaning: Viktor Frankl
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Man's_Search_for_Meaning

I've read a lot of Hannah Arendt. I think she's very relevant to our times.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hannah_Arendt

Cindy90
20-03-17, 07:29
Hello Angela.

Thank you so much for your recommendations. I'll check them out and see which one is suitable for my needs.

I guess it's very important to broaden ones horizon.


Greeting.

Cindy.

ajc347
27-03-17, 21:29
Nigel Warburton is a very engaging writer and I'd recommend his book 'Philosophy: The Classics' over his other works.

Anthony Kenny's 'A New History of Western Philosophy' is also an excellent read and I think that these two books, along with Bertrand Russell's, would serve as a very good introduction to the subject. :smile:

Angela
28-03-17, 16:02
Nigel Warburton is a very engaging writer and I'd recommend his book 'Philosophy: The Classics' over his other works.

Anthony Kenny's 'A New History of Western Philosophy' is also an excellent read and I think that these two books, along with Bertrand Russell's, would serve as a very good introduction to the subject. :smile:

I'm going to look for the Warburton book. I don't think I can face reading the whole Russell opus again. :)

Diomedes
11-04-17, 20:54
Before reading everything, try the "Epic of Gilgamesh" (no kidding). It is rather small, but I really enjoyed it.

Diomedes
11-04-17, 20:55
The works of Søren Kierkegaard, are also quite important in philosophy.

Bergin
16-04-17, 19:38
Philosophy in the Boudoir. - de Sade
(the italian version has a Moravia introduction if I remember correctly)


It is a bit scary (if you don't believe in censure, this one is quite a test), but the philosophic content is dense.
I could not read anymore Nietzsche afterwards, and i liked him.

Joustos
07-02-18, 19:08
Hi, Cindy
for early science and the early history of philosophy, all you need is:THE PRESOCRATIC PHILOSOPHERS, by Kirk & Raven, with original and translated Greek texts. (Cambridge at the university Press). When I was doing my graduate studies in philosophy, I paid about $ 4 for a paperback copy. That was long ago...

P.S: modern science begins with Galileo's DIALOGUES CONCERNING TWO NEW SCIENCES.
For history and culture, start with Vico's THE NEW SCIENCE or abridgments thereof.

Happy reading!

vyvyx
23-02-18, 13:55
I think Sartre as a lens that could be compounded onto any issue. There is something transcendent and quietly universal about his work and how it could be extrapolated into a worldview.

ACV
16-03-18, 11:13
I like to peel the onion back when it comes to philosophy... whom was influenced by whom then go there Nietzsche was inspired by the writings of Arthur Schopenhauer; I suppose the constant battle of the spirit was something they both were seeking.

Start with imanuel Kant “groundwork of the metaphysics of morals” to establish fundamentals.

And if you ever get really into an existentialist crises phase then I recommend “The Book” Alan Watts

CrazyDonkey
04-05-18, 02:43
For a deeper understanding of Nietzsche's philosophical background and development, read From Hegel to Nietzsche: The Revolution in 19th Century Thought by Karl Löwith.

IronSide
14-05-18, 23:14
This is one weird book

https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51K%2ByO5ppML.jpg

judithjohnson
17-06-19, 20:10
I also like these two thinkers, but what exactly do you like about them?

CrazyDonkey
06-07-19, 06:03
I also like these two thinkers, but what exactly do you like about them?

That culture (not just philosophy) is a dynamic development (or becoming) that ultimately can't be reduced to a single "authorizing" source or extrapolated to a final "justifying" end. Heraclitus' ever-changing river...

lukah.izreal
08-09-19, 13:55
Yeah, Russel's book is 1 of the best concerning pholosophy which I've ever read. Unique style of Russel makes this book really interesting!