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MsJ
01-05-17, 20:10
There are three physical/genetic traits that I am interested in knowing how they show up in regions in Europe.
1. The dry earwax/low body odor genetic mutation from Eastern Asia.
2. Mongolian spots in children, and especially ones that continue into adulthood.
3. Bifid uvula, submucosal cleft.

These are hereditary in my family and I have all three. Every doctor who sees my bifid uvula mentions they have never seen one in a "white person". My DNA shows nothing that indicates Native American ancestry no matter which way it is calculated. So is there a European population that has a high incidence of these three things?

Promenade
02-05-17, 01:48
I know that the EDAR gene(influences certain aspects of hair, skin etc. and sweat glands) which is common in East Asians and Native Americans, but absent in other populations, has been found in Mesolithic samples from Scandinavia(around 6,000BC) even though they had no East Asian ancestry. I just checked the wiki page and it was found even more recently in samples from the Afanasevo culture and even as recently as 2200 years ago with the Scythians.

Perhaps it was more common in ancient Europeans and at low levels still persists in a few populations.

MsJ
03-05-17, 20:20
I know that the EDAR gene(influences certain aspects of hair, skin etc. and sweat glands) which is common in East Asians and Native Americans, but absent in other populations, has been found in Mesolithic samples from Scandinavia(around 6,000BC) even though they had no East Asian ancestry. I just checked the wiki page and it was found even more recently in samples from the Afanasevo culture and even as recently as 2200 years ago with the Scythians.

Perhaps it was more common in ancient Europeans and at low levels still persists in a few populations.

I think that's a good theory. There is still so much unknown compared to known when it comes to genetic inheritance. I hope to find out more as time goes along.