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Angela
05-08-17, 22:01
I didn't even know foreigners did such bizarre things when cooking it. I've never seen Americans do them, but maybe it's where I live.

See: https://www.thelocal.it/20170717/ten-golden-rules-how-to-cook-pasta-like-the-italians-al-dente-chef

Being me, I have a few disagreements, or rather, additions. :)

It's very important to stir the pasta for a bit right after you put it in the boiling water, even if you have plenty of water, if you don't want it to stick together. I agree though that adding oil is a HUGE no, no.

Most tomato based sauces, especially ones with meat, benefit greatly from adding a pat of butter and then mixing right before serving. Trust me, it makes a big difference.

You don't need to make elaborate dishes to use up leftover pasta. My family loves when I fry it in olive oil in a pan. Leftover risotto can be made into patties and cooked the same way. They're right about one thing, like bread, it doesn't microwave well.

I like mine nice and crispy...I did it for lunch today...
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/4d/11/91/4d11911602ac176425458f058ebce012--fried-spaghetti-leftover-spaghetti.jpg

You can also add new ingredients to change it up....

Or, as the article points out, do things like pasta frittata, with beaten eggs, perhaps meat or other vegetables added if you choose:
https://lorenzovinci.it/magazine/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/frittata-pasta-03-690x430.jpg

davef
06-08-17, 07:12
Crispy spaghetti? Sounds like an elongated potato chip without the fun (by "fun" I mean salt, sour cream, onion). I prefer pasta that's wet enough so I feel as if I'm slurping up a mouthful of squirmy worms as I eat. I speculate that this could be due to my fierce appetite (I like to eat large portions of food very quickly at the expense of manners ;)) and the fact that my tongue is missing its outer membrane (which increases the friction against the food that slides down the surface of my tongue as I swallow, reducing its velocity and thus making it more likely for me to choke).

davef
06-08-17, 07:30
Oh and also cover it in lots of ricotta cheese!

Maciamo
06-08-17, 09:03
Those 10 "golden rules" seem pretty obvious to me. I have never seen or even heard of anyone in Belgium cook pasta any other way than the one described here.

There is just one caveat. With some gluten-free pasta (like the Italian brand Schär, one of the leading gluten-free brands in Europe) it might be necessary to rinse a bit the pasta as the water becomes too murky. Anyway with any rice product, be it boiled rice or pasta made with (among others) rice flour, it is a good idea to rinse the rice or pasta, as rice contains arsenic, and that arsenic can be eliminated in big part by rinsing. That's why before making risotto it's also important to rinse the uncooked rice abundantly.

Sile
06-08-17, 20:34
The question my wife gets asked in Australia on booking pasta is when to salt the water...........as some seem to think when to salt effects the texture of the pasta.

Angela
06-08-17, 21:40
Those 10 "golden rules" seem pretty obvious to me. I have never seen or even heard of anyone in Belgium cook pasta any other way than the one described here.

There is just one caveat. With some gluten-free pasta (like the Italian brand Schär, one of the leading gluten-free brands in Europe) it might be necessary to rinse a bit the pasta as the water becomes too murky. Anyway with any rice product, be it boiled rice or pasta made with (among others) rice flour, it is a good idea to rinse the rice or pasta, as rice contains arsenic, and that arsenic can be eliminated in big part by rinsing. That's why before making risotto it's also important to rinse the uncooked rice abundantly.

I do see the "add some oil" to the boiling water when cooking pasta thing on some American cooking sites and cookbooks, and some of the throw the pasta at the wall to see if it sticks crowd as well, believe it or not. Also, lots of people are told to rinse the pasta after draining.

So, there are definitely those for whom this would be useful.

Salento
07-08-17, 14:40
Oil is only added when boiling Pasta all'uovo (Tagliatelle, Tortellini,..)
Rinsing the Pasta with cold water prevent the pasta to stick to itself and from over softening after adding hot sauces.


Sent from my iPhone using Eupedia Forum (http://r.tapatalk.com/byo?rid=89698)

Angela
09-08-17, 04:14
Oil is only added when boiling Pasta all'uovo (Tagliatelle, Tortellini,..)
Rinsing the Pasta with cold water prevent the pasta to stick to itself and from over softening after adding hot sauces.


Sent from my iPhone using Eupedia Forum (http://r.tapatalk.com/byo?rid=89698)

Opinions differ, clearly. I agree with them. :) To me, adding oil even with tagliatelle etc. makes the sauce slice right off. No do I believe in rinsing off the starch. I would only add tap water if it was already on the verge of being too soft.
http://www.lacucinaitaliana.it/tutorial/i-consigli/cucinare-la-pasta-i-10-errori-piu-comuni/

For tortellini, anolini, ravioli, I still have my mother's old-fashioned scolapasta so I don't have to just dump it right out:


http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/NDgwWDY0MA==/z/lfcAAOSwu-BWORVg/$_35.JPG

I am seriously old-school. I still use all the below kind of pieces from her kitchen. Hey, as they say in America, if it ain't broke don't fix it. :)

https://img4.annuncicdn.it/00/be/00bed1039023afbd7f7506af963be32f_med.jpg

http://www.ganzomag.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/DSC_0008-R.jpg

http://www.brownrigg-interiors.co.uk/productimages/circa-1900-marble-pestle-and-mortar-4527-1.jpg

http://static.salepepe.it/files/2017/02/POLENTA-PERFETTA.jpg

Regio X
09-03-18, 02:11
Sorry if it is off-topic, but this is funny. :)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UL0rdPcqEOc

davef
09-03-18, 02:24
Saw this thread again, now I'm hungry

Angela
09-03-18, 02:51
Sorry if it is off-topic, but this is funny. :)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UL0rdPcqEOc

I've seriously felt like doing the same thing myself at times. :)

davef
09-03-18, 03:19
Got some lo mein :), the Chinese make great pasta as well

cybernautic
09-03-18, 04:18
I've seriously felt like doing the same thing myself at times. :)

Do you have a good recipe or advice for Saltsa Napolitana?

What ingredients do you use and what spices?

How do you prepare the Tomatoes for the sauce do you use them as pieces or do you blend them before?

Angela
09-03-18, 15:19
I actually don't make it; it's not my tradition. I think the most basic version is just garlic sauteed in olive oil, the tomatoes, some salt and pepper, and basil, either sautéed with the garlic in the beginning, or at the end. People usually put some sugar to get rid of the acidity. Perhaps someone can chime in and give their version with the steps and the cooking time, etc.

For our own sugo di pomodoro I almost never use fresh tomatoes. I find that the only ones that are sweet enough are the ones I get that are locally grown, but they're only available for a short time at the end of summer. The rest of the time they're shipped in from who knows where, but they must be picked green because they're tasteless. Plus, I either have to blanch them to skin them, and then get rid of some of the seeds, or I have to sieve them after cooking to get rid of all of the skins and seeds, which is all extra work.

I don't feel guilty because even at home in Italy my family really only uses the fresh tomatoes at the end of the summer.:) People who grow a lot of them peel and can them anyway for the rest of the year.

Here in America I buy imported San Marzano tomatoes from Campania. They're a variety of plum tomato which is very sweet and has very few seeds. I usually get the whole peeled tomatoes. I find that the flavor is more intense that way, but you can use the crushed variety as well. Where our sauce is different from the Neapolitan one is that we start with a soffrito of chopped celery, onion and carrot (the latter gets rid of the need to add sugar) sautéed in olive oil, then when golden we added a little garlic, then a bit of tomato paste, and then the tomatoes, which I usually crush a bit with my hands before adding, and salt and pepper. I simmer it for at least an hour, break it up more at the end if necessary by using an immersion blender, and finish off with some chopped parsley. I usually make it in big batches, and freeze small containers of it to use for the whole month.

Salento
09-03-18, 15:26
As a general Rule, stick with just garlic, or onion when making Tomato Sauce. NOT both.
And don’t put too much either, especially the garlic.
If you can taste the garlic, you put too much on it.
IMO

davef
09-03-18, 16:11
Why should there be rules anyway? You should make it the way you like it

Salento
09-03-18, 17:07
Why should there be rules anyway? You should make it the way you like it

Because in tomato sauce is superfluous. Pick one: garlic or onion.
Sure you know what they say about Italians. If they can’t Sing they can Cook ! lol [emoji5]

Angela
09-03-18, 17:11
Why should there be rules anyway? You should make it the way you like it

Why? It's because people who have a good palate have experimented for years trying to make certain dishes better and better. Indeed, some recipes are the result of generations of such experimentation. Certain techniques lead to certain results, certain ingredients bring out the flavor of other ingredients. There are courses now teaching cooking based on chemical principles etc., making clear what people arrived at by trial and error.

Try it the way it's meant to be, and then if you have such a bad palate that you prefer it ruined, go ahead. There are no jail sentences for ruining dishes it took centuries to perfect, although maybe there should be. :)

Well, there are consequences on a personal level, at least from someone like me. :) I can't tell you how many dating relationships ended for me after going out to dinner with a man with no palate whatsoever: I only eat meat and potatoes; I don't eat anything green; Where's the ketchup while eating pasta! :) Good Lord, when I heard the latter I was tempted to excuse myself to go to the lady's room and never return!

Seriously, the only thing I really object to is when people call some cockamamie bastardization of an Italian dish by the traditional name. It gives a totally wrong impression.

Salento
09-03-18, 17:34
Most Dishes are a Blend of Ingredients, and a Balance of flavors.
Should not be overpowered by one ingredient or spices, unless the original recipe call for it.
I think.

AdeoF
09-03-18, 17:38
Where's the ketchup while eating pasta! :) .
That is a very student thing to eat which reminds me when i was in Malta for my 2nd year at uni. Even just pasta and that's it lol

LABERIA
09-03-18, 19:02
Because in tomato sauce is superfluous. Pick one: garlic or onion.
Sure you know what they say about Italians. If they can’t Sing they can Cook ! lol [emoji5]
lol. Si, e vero.

cybernautic
09-03-18, 19:25
@Angela,Salento

Thanks for your advices

Angela
09-03-18, 19:34
That is a very student thing to eat which reminds me when i was in Malta for my 2nd year at uni. Even just pasta and that's it lol

Good grief, Adeo, tell me it ain't so! :) Always have at least butter, oil, garlic, and a piece of parmigiano on hand.

When my children were young, the first pasta I served them, after pastina with just butter, was spaghetti with a big pat of butter and a handful of grated parmigiano reggiano per 4 oz. serving. Add some of the pasta water to make it creamy. What could be easier?

Or, saute some garlic in olive oil. If you like "hot", add a bit of flaked red pepper, or if you like salty and savory, 1 anchovy fillet.

This is the way it should be done, imo, except I use the whole, crushed garlic and let it cook a bit longer before adding the pasta water. I also use real, chopped pepperoncini, but I know some places don't carry it. This is one of those dishes which, imo, Americans ruin by adding parmigiano and not romano.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DgT-pnqACXQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DgT-pnqACXQ

Just no ketchup on pasta, please, I beg you! :)

Yetos
09-03-18, 19:45
Make your own makaronia
i did when i was young
learn it from grandma

well little bit different


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SeMgkjw71Hk

davef
09-03-18, 20:01
Why? It's because people who have a good palate have experimented for years trying to make certain dishes better and better. Indeed, some recipes are the result of generations of such experimentation. Certain techniques lead to certain results, certain ingredients bring out the flavor of other ingredients. There are courses now teaching cooking based on chemical principles etc., making clear what people arrived at by trial and error.

Try it the way it's meant to be, and then if you have such a bad palate that you prefer it ruined, go ahead. There are no jail sentences for ruining dishes it took centuries to perfect, although maybe there should be. :)

Well, there are consequences on a personal level, at least from someone like me. :) I can't tell you how many dating relationships ended for me after going out to dinner with a man with no palate whatsoever: I only eat meat and potatoes; I don't eat anything green; Where's the ketchup while eating pasta! :) Good Lord, when I heard the latter I was tempted to excuse myself to go to the lady's room and never return!

Seriously, the only thing I really object to is when people call some cockamamie bastardization of an Italian dish by the traditional name. It gives a totally wrong impression.
if ruining dishes leads to prison sentences id be in a jumpsuit by now. :). I have a friend who used to put green "shrek" ketchup on his kraft mac n cheese lol.I can foresee a pig turning down his slop before I start digging my nose in it!



EDIT:
Got this from subway:
Ft long Spicy italian on wheat, double meat, double Swiss cheese, lettuce, tomato, ranch,chipotle sauce, spicy mustard, Caesar dressing, mayo, olives and hot peppers, toasted :)


EDIT 2: OMG I ate half the spicy sandwich too fast, now my stomach is burning up!
Not feeling good right now :(

Yetos
10-03-18, 00:35
hmmm

i like tomatoe sause without sugar, so no ketchup
I like garlic only in meat

tomatoes and tomatoes pulp sause
I like it with basilikos
i like it with Kyminon (cuminum)
with onions
with oil, feta chesse, and rigane (oregano), yammee
with anisus

and I taste it once by a chef who was testing new tastes
tomatoe pasta with trigonella μοσχοσιταρο fenugreek
fantastic but for very special tastes,
ideal for beef tomatoe sauce with makaroni


PS
I am always against unatural things and climate economy
So I prefer tomatoe sause with tomatoe smashed or pieces in Summer
But at winter Surely I will not want buy tomatoes with 'hormones' to make a fresh sause
so I make or I buy tomatoe pulp

davef
19-03-18, 06:16
I read from cracked.com (disclaimer: the site is not work safe) that when alcohol is added to food, only 15 percent of it burns off upon cooking. Does this partially explain why I tend to "feel good" :) when eating one of my favorite pasta recipes, penne alla vodka (though I'm reaching for an antacid shortly after)?

Seriously though, i wonder if this is true?

davef
19-03-18, 06:36
I'll add...there seems to be a thing with making mozzarella cheese super thick and almost gum like for lasagna. My own personal rule is soften up the cheese bc I choke easily (my throat muscles are weak). I choked a few times on mozzarella from baked zitti and lasagna due to how it was prepared and making it rougher.

Mozzarella can kill...

Yetos
19-03-18, 23:27
Οκ
the rules of Cooking spaggeti (makaronia)
as I learn them from mam

OK
many here have different opinions
but that is how I learn

Rule No 1

that is how we put them in the caserolla (Katsarolla)

https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-4D5sk5FEj7c/UKPLAgXQgbI/AAAAAAACiPg/UdFFJkvGYpQ/s1600/newego_LARGE_t_89761_105857668_type12550.jpg


we prefer water not cold neither boiling
around 50-60 C is good to enter as the above the spaggeti
the heat must be very strong now till the boiling degree


Rule No 2

we avoid very strong heat, when starts boiling
and always concern about the quantity of water,
otherwise we might get that result

https://www.otherside.gr/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/mageirema-fail-21.jpg



Rule No 3

That is personal choice,
I prefer to add salt at boiling water,
yet makes too much foam,
but I believe inserts inside the makaronia
and prevents it for getting as white mud


Rule No 4

you know when spaggeti is ready
by the following act
you throw one at a vertical position tile,
if not ready won't stick
if boiled too much will drop due to overweight and low 'glue' κολλα
The perfect is to throw it and stick on the tile for 5-10 seconds moveless

https://frikocooking.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/1b.jpg?w=760


that is the correct time to strain them

Rule No 5

I personally hate that,
the fried makaroni
I prefer Makaronia/spaggeti not fried,
I mean not back to the chauldron to fry them with butter or olive oil,

I prefer them half washed in the strainer with little bit warm water
and then (with hands) to the dishes puring room temperature olive oil.
mixing them, and serve above the sauce and cheese
for me, warm makaroni, cool olive oil


Rule No 6

We eat with a fork, spoon is for soups,
forget Savoir vivre when comes to delicasy

Different people diffrent opinions,

But that is my rules/suggestions

BTW
I am not Italian, so I do not search for the perfect result,
I am sure that their chefs make it a science,
but I am satisfied with the result following the above


PS
the tile must the typical white ones for cuisine with smalt


PS2
call me the barbarian of the cuisina

Angela
19-03-18, 23:59
Οκ
the rules of Cooking spaggeti (makaronia)
as I learn them from mam

OK
many here have different opinions
but that is how I learn

Rule No 1

that is how we put them in the caserolla (Katsarolla)

https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-4D5sk5FEj7c/UKPLAgXQgbI/AAAAAAACiPg/UdFFJkvGYpQ/s1600/newego_LARGE_t_89761_105857668_type12550.jpg


we prefer water not cold neither boiling
around 50-60 C is good to enter as the above the spaggeti
the heat must be very strong now till the boiling degree


Rule No 2

we avoid very strong heat, when starts boiling
and always concern about the quantity of water,
otherwise we might get that result

https://www.otherside.gr/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/mageirema-fail-21.jpg



Rule No 3

That is personal choice,
I prefer to add salt at boiling water,
yet makes too much foam,
but I believe inserts inside the makaronia
and prevents it for getting as white mud


Rule No 4

you know when spaggeti is ready
by the following act
you throw one at a vertical position tile,
if not ready won't stick
if boiled too much will drop due to overweight and low 'glue' κολλα
The perfect is to throw it and stick on the tile for 5-10 seconds moveless

https://frikocooking.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/1b.jpg?w=760


that is the correct time to strain them

Rule No 5

I personally hate that,
the fried makaroni
I prefer Makaronia/spaggeti not fried,
I mean not back to the chauldron to fry them with butter or olive oil,

I prefer them half washed in the strainer with little bit warm water
and then (with hands) to the dishes puring room temperature olive oil.
mixing them, and serve above the sauce and cheese
for me, warm makaroni, cool olive oil


Rule No 6

We eat with a fork, spoon is for soups,
forget Savoir vivre when comes to delicasy

Different people diffrent opinions,

But that is my rules/suggestions

BTW
I am not Italian, so I do search for the perfect result,
I am sure that their chefs make it a science,
but I am satisfied with the result following the above


PS
the tile must the typical white ones for cuisine with smalt


PS2
call me the barbarian of the cuisina

Well, it's interesting.

Just a gentle suggestion: try it our way for once! :)

Yetos
20-03-18, 00:52
@ Angela

That is a recippe that I learn at Thessaloniki
The cooker was Greek with Alexandreia Egypt descent

fresh tomatoes cleaned up from their skin

boil onios on water,
when water evaporates drop olive oil and an idea of garlic
do not dry them much
drop the tomatoes and anisus, either a star, either few broken seeds from Mediterean anisus (some put ouzo but it is very heavy due to masticha)
1-2 cinnamon tree wooden skins
salt

for rich flavor add Makedonian red peppers, and or makedonian sweat pepper (bukovo) (can also be sweat, or sweat-hot, or hot)

extra-secret, an idea of marmelade for extra flavouring, strawberry, or redberry or less in quantity blackberry
for extra flavours, not needed in basic sauce

makedonian peppers and pepper
they are not hot. widely known as Florina peppers.

http://www.agronews.gr/files/temp/58711C3D64AF5FDF72E4C835C185AE41.jpg

sweat pepper
http://www.fotsi.gr/userfiles/products/thumb/1_%CE%9C%CE%A0%CE%9F%CE%A5%CE%9A%CE%9F%CE%92%CE%9F %20%CE%93%CE%9B%CE%A5%CE%9A%CE%9F_1487375640.jpg

hot pepper from Almopia Αλμωπια

https://www.sesoyla.gr/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/-%CE%BA%CE%B1%CF%80%CE%BD%CE%B9%CF%83%CF%84%CE%BF-e1495142244967.jpg


less known sauces and tastes


bietnamese anisus
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41dEcRBRUBL._AC_UL160_SR160,160_.jpg


mediterennean anisos
https://www.tropos-zois.gr/images/stories/virtuemart/product/glikanisos16.jpg




Alternative for Anisus if is strong smell
try Fennel or finocchio or Liquorice for more sweat.

Salento
20-03-18, 19:32
@Yetos. What kind of pasta do you recommend with your sauce? Long, short, small, pastina. I’m open to try new food. If I find the ingredients I might try it. :)

davef
20-03-18, 19:43
For me, it's fusilli or corkscrew shaped, penne is awesome as well. Tortellini salad stuffed with cheese and smothered in olive oil as a side dish to a sub sandwich sends my tastebuds to heaven

Yetos
21-03-18, 01:00
@ Davef

really i do not know what kind.

Italians made pasta a science since 1000 years ago'
surely something thick with a small hard point to chew, and can hold the sauce
Yep Fusilli and penne will be good, and the other that looks like a coccoon an oyster,


as for tortelinia,
the good things in life, are still made by hands!!! :laughing:
so use your hands, when consume!!! :grin:


20 years ago, when I study,
I could not manage rice,
so the 'descent' food was makaronia/pasta and smashed potattoes, or in furno
especially pasta, cause needed less time to prepair.
which with just olive oil and cheese can have a nice taste and descent food,
the most simple sauce, olive oil, smashed feta cheese, and little bit of oregano or basilico at top.
just to bring a smell a sparkle on the nose, before the taste
too much oregano makes it bitter.
for me that is the problem with pasta,
they are great at mouth, but neutral at nose
they need the little something to 'tease' the nose
and that is what a sauce must do in pasta,
while in meat, we use sauce to make it soft to chew, slippery at mouth,
in pasta sauce must give a fresh smell to 'erase' the smelling ability cells and brain.

davef
21-03-18, 02:26
Ummm..."use your hands when consume"-you're saying you should eat tortellini with your hands?

And thanks to this thread I'm going to buy a bunch of mozzarella sticks at the gas station when I get my nightly coffee there! Hopefully they have them in stock, last week I was very disappointed when I couldn't find any.

Salento
21-03-18, 02:52
Tortellini are Fingers Food, and Ketchup is a substitute for Tomato Sauce. I’m learning so much from you guys. [emoji3]

davef
21-03-18, 06:25
Seriously, try an Italian sub with stuffed tortellini salad, it's one of the best things I've ever had!

Yetos
21-03-18, 07:12
@davef

is it true that the best mozarells is made by donkey milk?

davef
21-03-18, 07:17
Yetos, mozzarella is made from buffalo milk. I'm not the best person when it comes to knowledge of food, Angela seems to know a lot more about culinary stuff imo.

Yetos
21-03-18, 07:27
Yetos, mozzarella is made from buffalo milk. I'm not the best person when it comes to knowledge of food, Angela seems to know a lot more about culinary stuff imo.

buffalo?

i wish we had such animal in our diet,
than cows and beef,

It is much healthier,
especially its fat when compared with cow/beef

https://image.slidesharecdn.com/topikproiontaserron-1english-130405085451-phpapp01/95/comeniuslocal-products-of-serres-greece-29-638.jpg?cb=1365152223

Salento
21-03-18, 13:18
Good Luck milking a Buffalo.
Mozzarella di BUFALA ( The Lady ) :)
Reading a Menu in a restaurant, or Browsing the grocery store, is obvious to me, the Butchering of the Italian Language.

Angela
21-03-18, 14:46
By all means try eating these as a finger food! :)

The most common way I eat them.

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7235/7173576335_b152fa6b2f_z.jpg

Any pasta "salad" is an abomination imo: a glooey, gelatinous mess created by Americans.

The bufalo breed in Italy is a water buffalo. It may have been introduced into Italy from the Balkans as a matter of fact.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian_Mediterranean_buffalo

http://www.traveller.com.au/content/dam/images/g/m/s/w/d/0/image.related.articleLeadwide.520x294.gmswbi.png/1455760047386.jpgI almost never buy it here because mozzarella should be eaten either the day it's made or shortly thereafter. So, I buy the mozzarella made near by which is sold in my neighborhood Italian supermarket. It definitely doesn't taste the same, but better than something past its "due" date, if you know what I mean.

This is burrata made from that mozzarella and cream.
https://blog.williams-sonoma.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/img4l.jpg

The scamorza is a better bet.

davef
21-03-18, 14:54
Angela, no offense but why is everything I LOVE an ABOMINATION to you? :grin: I'm not offended and you're entitled to like and dislike what you want but I'm just baffled that everything you describe as an abomination tops my chart!!

Angela
21-03-18, 15:35
Angela, no offense but why is everything I LOVE an ABOMINATION to you? :grin: I'm not offended and you're entitled to like and dislike what you want but I'm just baffled that everything you describe as an abomination tops my chart!!

The reason is that you have a totally America palate. You obviously weren't raised with real Italian food, and so you don't know what it's supposed to taste like...

I promise you that were you to go to Italy you would not find these foods. Even if called by similar names, they would be totally different.

This poor kid, an Italian exchange student, is trying very hard to be polite, but...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7I4q6WE43w

An Italian goes to Olive Garden...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kXCI8GWFp08

It's not that my family doesn't like some American foods. They usually come in the summer and I barbecue steak for them, with sweet corn on the cob, for example, or we go to clambakes, and they love it. They also like a good hamburger if it's made with good quality meat.

They even like the pizza from my local pizzeria, but the owner is from Napoli, so it's clear that they would.

I just would never take them to an Olive Garden, or serve them pineapple pizza.

As to pasta salads:

"Some might say the most common mistake in making pasta salad is, well, making pasta salad. And given the pasta salads of our youth—tri-colored spirals of fusilli, clammy and cold, swimming in pools of nondescript oil and peppered with floppy slices of salami, chopped bell pepper, and cubes of tasteless cheddar cheese or, if we were lucky, pepper jack—we might be inclined to agree. But not all pasta salad is bad—it's just that almost all of it could be, well, a whole lot better. We spoke with senior food editor Dawn Perry about how to create a pasta salad that you'll actually want to eat."

https://www.bonappetit.com/test-kitchen/common-mistakes/article/pasta-salad-common-mistakes

If people have to eat pasta salads, follow their advice.

davef
21-03-18, 15:52
Thanks that makes sense! I guess the only thing Italian about me is my genes and ancestry lol! :)

Angela
21-03-18, 15:56
Thanks that makes sense! I guess the only thing Italian about me is my genes and ancestry lol! :)

Well, I find that surprising. Italians usually keep their food traditions, if nothing else.

Salento
21-03-18, 16:02
This Pizzas are really good. I waited on line for over 1 hour. And I’ll do it again.
Both makes the Best Pizza in America IMO.
I ordered the classic pizza, others got clams ( weirdos :) ).
New Haven’s Pizza Smackdown: Pepe’s vs. Sally’s
https://www.tripsavvy.com/which-is-the-best-pizza-in-new-haven-connecticut-4138405
Pizza Wars:

https://youtu.be/aTRKEOdONhI

davef
22-03-18, 05:15
Actually I have my own unique palate called the davef palate! The things I'd eat would drive people mad. Cheeseburger with Mac salad toppings and ketchup anyone? Lol

ps stupid auto correct was about to write chess instead of cheese...a chess burger topped with rooks and queens would put my teeth in checkmate lol

and the only turnoff in terms of mac salad is it being made with mayo. The thought of mayo mixed with pasta makes even myself cringe, especially since I'm not a mayo fan. I don't know if anyone else here uses mayo a lot.

Salento
22-03-18, 05:53
Is it possible that we are what we eat ? I say yes. :)

davef
22-03-18, 06:11
Salento I love your avatar, he got mad style, do the disco boop boop boop ba boop boop ba boop boop boop boop boop boop boop boop.............................................. .BOOP

Yetos
22-03-18, 07:25
@ Davef

the Greeks of Pontos eat pasta with Greek Yogurt
have you try it?

davef
22-03-18, 14:42
Hi Yetos, no I haven't had pasta with Greek yogurt, and no offense but I'm not sure if I'll enjoy mixing pasta and yogurt together. I did have Greek lasagna, forgot the name but it was really good and it was very different from Italian lasagna.

Salento
22-03-18, 15:19
@Davef. Do not try Vegetarian Lasagne, I think you won’t like it.
Disco Disco boom boom, Disco Disco boom boom, Disco Disco boom boom, ..... lol

davef
22-03-18, 15:52
@Davef. Do not try Vegetarian Lasagne, I think you won’t like it.
Disco Disco boom boom, Disco Disco boom boom, Disco Disco boom boom, ..... lol

LOLZ DISCO STU LIKES YO STYLE!!

Vegetarian lasagna is great, as long as it doesn't leave out the ricotta or mozzarella to be more "vegan" else it's a BRIIIICK HOOOOWWWSSSE!!!

And forget wine from the lush rolling vineyards of Europe, the best beverage with Italian food is a tall n frosty MILLER LITE !!!

AdeoF
22-03-18, 16:15
@Davef. Do not try Vegetarian Lasagne, I think you won’t like it.
Disco Disco boom boom, Disco Disco boom boom, Disco Disco boom boom, ..... lol

Vegetarian Lasagne??? eww i would give it a pass. I can trust the Tuscans with there pastas tho!

Angela
22-03-18, 16:52
Someone's list of the best pasta dishes:
https://www.greatitalianchefs.com/features/traditional-italian-pasta-dishes

Can't believe how much they missed.

Seafood pasta:
https://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/09/62/8a/6f/il-pirata-delle-cinque.jpg

Sicilian Sardine sauce:
https://passion4sicily.files.wordpress.com/2014/05/pasta-con-le-sarde2.jpg

Pappardelle with wild boar ragu:
https://stefangourmet.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/dsc01433.jpg

Agnolotti with cream and truffle sauce:
http://www.rana.it/cms/uploads/ricetta/ravioli-di-brasato-tartufo-big.jpg

Meat ravioli alla genovese:
http://cdn.taccuinistorici.it/fotoricette/864.jpg

Pansotti with salsa di noci
https://i.pinimg.com/564x/45/88/ef/4588ef8e57fcc2a3633a33b2f4d88804.jpg

Lasagne
http://misrecetasthermomix.es/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Lasagne-alla-bolognese-2.jpg

I could go on, but I won't. :)

davef
22-03-18, 17:53
Salento, you said some went to that new haven place for clams or used them as a topping?
I guess clams would work on pizza, I know someone who likes tuna fish on his pizza which is something I've never seen nor had, then again I really don't like tuna so I can't judge how well it goes with pizza.

Salento
22-03-18, 17:59
Salento, you said some went to that new haven place for clams or used them as a topping?
I guess clams would work on pizza, I know someone who likes tuna fish on his pizza which is something I've never seen nor had, then again I really don't like tuna so I can't judge how well it goes with pizza.

In many cases those that order pizza with Clams is because they are Lactose Intolerants. The “Rule” is: No cheese, and No mozzarella on Sea Food, almost always, Period. :)
People say:
“Mangia a gusto tuo, ma vestiti al gusto d’altri”
“Eat as you like, but get Dress as other people want you to.” ( I don’t know how to say it in English )

Yetos
24-03-18, 17:41
Any sauce for fioggiakia, farfalle.

I think they worth a milk sauce, than a tomatoe sauce.
do you agree?

Yetos
24-03-18, 17:45
In many cases those that order pizza with Clams is because they are Lactose Intolerants. The “Rule” is: No cheese, and No mozzarella on Sea Food, almost always, Period. :)
People say:
“Mangia a gusto tuo, ma vestiti al gusto d’altri”
“Eat as you like, but get Dress as other people want you to.” ( I don’t know how to say it in English )

Indeed
I know that do
it is dangerous sometimes,
especially combination of egg cheese and fish
may bring serious problem to your stomach,
a kind of reaction with phosphoric fat of fish


anyway some shells are just dive with cheese for example saganaki

Yetos
24-03-18, 17:48
lasagne from Laganon and linguistic combo with lavas lawas
an ancient type of bread ?

Night
24-03-18, 17:52
I joined this site 01-03-18.
You have been moderating and deleting all of my posts.
I sent you an email on this subject.
Can you please either start letting my posts on, or deactivate my account?
This is just wrong.

Angela
24-03-18, 18:45
I joined this site 01-03-18.
You have been moderating and deleting all of my posts.
I sent you an email on this subject.
Can you please either start letting my posts on, or deactivate my account?
This is just wrong.

I just saw this. It didn't show up because it's a moderated post. The site randomly chooses posts which have to be manually accepted. It does it to my posts as well. If we don't happen to see them in a thread we're reading, we're unaware of it. If, in the future you can't see your post, then pm any of the moderators giving them the thread and page number and they'll take a look at it. In 99% of the cases it will be approved.

Perhaps it's best if you don't assume any nefarious motives behind certain things.

Angela
24-03-18, 19:25
Any sauce for fioggiakia, farfalle.

I think they worth a milk sauce, than a tomatoe sauce.
do you agree?

Given their shape and delicate structure I usually dress them with a light tomato or cream sauce. I tend to use them more frequently in the summer with "raw" or barely cooked ingredients, like cherry tomatoes, olives, cubed mozzarella, basil, oil. I like feta so I sometimes substitute that. As with all "raw" sauces, it has to be eaten that day or it gets gelatinous and disgusting.

I also combine them with sauteed zucchini and oil, or really, any sauteed vegetablesin the summer when they're so abundant and good.

It's often served with shrimp or salmon and peas or asparagus and a very light cream sauce as well.
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8383/8527176955_c736c6a3bc.jpg

I often mix them with pesto too.
http://www.minimunchie.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/classicpesto-11-1024x640.jpg

We eat a lot of fava beans, including with pasta, but my favorite way is raw with pecorino sheep's milk cheese.

http://media.paperblog.fr/i/435/4357828/presto-pasta-nights-209-farfalle-con-fave-pas-L-FTLj2P.jpeg

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4035/4586945280_bc519bd641_o.jpg

Night
24-03-18, 21:04
I just saw this. It didn't show up because it's a moderated post. The site randomly chooses posts which have to be manually accepted. It does it to my posts as well. If we don't happen to see them in a thread we're reading, we're unaware of it. If, in the future you can't see your post, then pm any of the moderators giving them the thread and page number and they'll take a look at it. In 99% of the cases it will be approved.

Perhaps it's best if you don't assume any nefarious motives behind certain things.
Not assigning nefarious motives.
I have been on this site trying to post in a patient manner, with calmness and no complaints for quite sometime.
I tried to PM you and was unable to do so.
It's highly frustrating.

Jovialis
15-04-18, 21:00
https://i.imgur.com/fXrXReD.jpg

Another great Sunday lunch.

Angela
15-04-18, 21:41
https://i.imgur.com/fXrXReD.jpg

Another great Sunday lunch.

Strozzapreti with sauce and ricotta salata? Or do you call them cesarecci?

Jovialis
15-04-18, 22:03
https://i.imgur.com/NzQbjiA.jpg

Here's the pasta that was used, with the ragu sauce.

Jovialis
15-04-18, 22:23
My dad said he used pecorino cheese on it.

Angela
15-04-18, 22:27
https://i.imgur.com/NzQbjiA.jpg

Here's the pasta that was used, with the ragu sauce.

They're just different names for the same thing, or they're very, very similar.

Strozzapreti:
http://www.gelsomora.com/media/catalog/product/cache/2/image/800x/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/s/t/strozzapreti1.jpg

They're also similar to our trofie, which we serve with pesto usually:
http://www.cascine-emiliane.it/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Trofie_al_pesto.jpg

I know Puglia makes excellent pasta.

Jovialis
15-04-18, 23:58
They're just different names for the same thing, or they're very, very similar.

Strozzapreti:
http://www.gelsomora.com/media/catalog/product/cache/2/image/800x/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/s/t/strozzapreti1.jpg

They're also similar to our trofie, which we serve with pesto usually:
http://www.cascine-emiliane.it/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Trofie_al_pesto.jpg

I know Puglia makes excellent pasta.


Looks amazing, I love pesto!

davef
16-04-18, 06:16
Dang Jovialis, you're lucky I wasn't there else you'd see those mozzarella slices gone in a heartbeat!!! I love mozzarella in that form, i prefer to have it that way on pizzas as opposed to the shredded stuff that gets dry and stale (I'll admit, I can be the biggest thief at parties with snacks, I would take half the ranch dressing with one potato chip lol).

I think I had macaroni and cheese in that pasta shape as a side dish for steak or chicken breast.

Yetos
16-04-18, 20:06
Given their shape and delicate structure I usually dress them with a light tomato or cream sauce. I tend to use them more frequently in the summer with "raw" or barely cooked ingredients, like cherry tomatoes, olives, cubed mozzarella, basil, oil. I like feta so I sometimes substitute that. As with all "raw" sauces, it has to be eaten that day or it gets gelatinous and disgusting.

I also combine them with sauteed zucchini and oil, or really, any sauteed vegetablesin the summer when they're so abundant and good.

It's often served with shrimp or salmon and peas or asparagus and a very light cream sauce as well.
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8383/8527176955_c736c6a3bc.jpg

I often mix them with pesto too.
http://www.minimunchie.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/classicpesto-11-1024x640.jpg

We eat a lot of fava beans, including with pasta, but my favorite way is raw with pecorino sheep's milk cheese.

http://media.paperblog.fr/i/435/4357828/presto-pasta-nights-209-farfalle-con-fave-pas-L-FTLj2P.jpeg

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4035/4586945280_bc519bd641_o.jpg




That is very interesting,
combining pasta with beans,

I will try to make it in near future,
and make my 'expirements' so to bring it closer to my taste.

what is different,
what you call fava beans in Greek is Κυαμος, compare Cyamismos= lack of G6PDD enzymon, Modern Greek koukia
and we avoid to consume them,
exept Cyamismos, they might also react with mallaria antisomes, and some other,

what we call fava is another legume/bean
simmilar to the old one that is ancient, cultiveted almost 6 000 years in Aegean


https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-IBwceSk-CSs/TxwmtmGf2cI/AAAAAAAAFBY/lKICfBqBj-8/s1600/favasantorini.JPG

Angela
16-04-18, 22:09
That is very interesting,
combining pasta with beans,

I will try to make it in near future,
and make my 'expirements' so to bring it closer to my taste.

what is different,
what you call fava beans in Greek is Κυαμος, compare Cyamismos= lack of G6PDD enzymon, Modern Greek koukia
and we avoid to consume them,
exept Cyamismos, they might also react with mallaria antisomes, and some other,

what we call fava is another legume/bean
simmilar to the old one that is ancient, cultiveted almost 6 000 years in Aegean


https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-IBwceSk-CSs/TxwmtmGf2cI/AAAAAAAAFBY/lKICfBqBj-8/s1600/favasantorini.JPG

I've never heard of that as a reason for not eating "broad" or fava beans, and in the past there was a lot of malaria in Italy.

Anyway, combining grains and beans creates a complete protein, so not every meal has to contain meat. That was even more important in the past.

Pasta and bean soup is ubiquitous in Italy. I've posted my version here.
https://www.eupedia.com/forum/threads/34684-Recipe-for-best-bean-and-macaroni-soup-Pasta-e-fagioli?highlight=Pasta+fagioli

Pasta and ceci or chick peas is also very good. My method is similar to the video below except I tend to use ditalini for the pasta. and before I put the pasta in to boil, I put at least half of the beans in a food processor so that the end product is creamier, and looks more like this, with less pork.(Using just a bit of pancetta instead of a lot of guanciale gives a good taste without so much fat.)



http://blog.giallozafferano.it/chefpercasofra/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/WP_20160926_001.jpg

For the recipe:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=Awf193uoK58

I make things like this all the time in the summer. Just cook everything separately and then mix with olive oil, salt, and pepper, maybe even some fresh lemon juice. You can throw in some feta too if you like, why not?
https://www.healthy-delicious.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Beans-Greens-Pasta.jpg

Salento
16-04-18, 22:42
For Pasta e Ceci fry or toast about 6 or 8 pieces of the cooked pasta (fry if fresh/homemade pasta) for portion, and then put it in the pasta e ceci right before you dish it out.
(Ancient Secret) :)
Also parmigiano is optional if you do that.

Yetos
16-04-18, 23:33
chick peas is the yellow ones?
my favorite with rice,
http://www.eliasmamalakis.gr/images/uploads/revithia-me-rizi.jpg

soup, and . drrrrrrrrrum MEATBALLS (with no meat)

https://alexpoli.gr/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/revu8okeftedes-niam.jpg


that legume is my favorite.

Angela
17-04-18, 02:10
chick peas is the yellow ones?
my favorite with rice,
http://www.eliasmamalakis.gr/images/uploads/revithia-me-rizi.jpg

soup, and . drrrrrrrrrum MEATBALLS (with no meat)

https://alexpoli.gr/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/revu8okeftedes-niam.jpg


that legume is my favorite.

In English they're called garbanzo beans or chick peas. If you like them you'd like the soups with pasta and the salads.
http://therealitalianfood.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/CECI.jpg

We even add them to pasta with mussels:

https://i.imgur.com/SL27vwr.png

They're probably most commonly mixed with grains in soups. In eastern Liguria, La Spezia especially, there's an ancient dish called mesciua, meaning mixed, which is just a combination of cooked ceci, farro, an ancient emmer wheat which we still grow, and either borlotti or white beans. The latter are my favorite because they're the creamiest.
To be honest, I don't love it, because the only flavor comes from the olive oil, a clove or two of garlic and some rosemary, the latter two of which aren't even traditional. It's filling, nutritional, and cheap, though, and was a staple of the peasant diet.

https://blog.giallozafferano.it/francescapassionecucina/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_2453-e1509281478704.jpg

This is farro or emmer wheat. You could use spelt but it's not the same.

http://www.ciboitaliano.com/public/ortofrutticoli/immagine401.jpeg

Angela
19-05-18, 02:50
Nigella Lawson's take on spaghetti puttanesca. It's pretty straightforward. A lot of her recipes cater to modern British tastes, and so they run to Indian and Thai spices, as well as North African sometimes, but she does do Italian-ish and French-ish dishes as well.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KQ2iQK56cTM

Angela
28-05-18, 20:46
These Roman chefs are not happy with the ingredients and techniques used by American and British tv chefs for making that Roman classic: Spaghetti alla Carbonara. :)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnZ_70XyVAk

I think they'd be happy with this version from Bon Appetit magazine. It uses only the 5 traditional ingredients, and the technique isn't that off. I basically do it this way and it's delicious. She's very good, this young chef.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2JYub2JxoDo

Salento
28-05-18, 21:39
These Roman chefs are not happy with the ingredients and techniques used by American and British tv chefs for making that Roman classic: Spaghetti alla Carbonara. :)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnZ_70XyVAk

I think they'd be happy with this version from Bon Appetit magazine. It uses only the 5 traditional ingredients, and the technique isn't that off. I basically do it this way and it's delicious. She's very good, this young chef.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2JYub2JxoDo

I think that Molly added way too much salt in the water, and the hot water that she added later shoud have been boiling or almost. Bucatini are great for Carbonara and Amatriciana too! Mixing pecorino and parmigiano is still better than just pecorino. (Stick just with Parmigiano for Carbonara) :thinking:

Angela
28-05-18, 22:37
Not my taste. Not piquant enough. It was originally just pecorino. They couldn't afford parmigiano.

Salento
08-06-18, 16:12
Anthony Bourdain

https://cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/180417110646-explore-parts-unknown-seattle-01-large-169.jpg

Born: June 25, 1956, New York City, NY
Died: June 8, 2018, Strasbourg, France
:(

https://www-m.cnn.com/2018/06/08/us/anthony-bourdain-obit/index.html

Jovialis
14-08-18, 18:24
Mathematicians solve age-old spaghetti mystery:


https://phys.org/news/2018-08-mathematicians-age-old-spaghetti-mystery.html

Jovialis
22-01-19, 16:58
I finally learned how to make tomato sauce for pasta. I made it for lobster ravioli, which came out really good.

This is how I did it:

1. I chopped half an onion into pieces, and cooked with olive oil in a large pot until it was quasi-translucent.

2. I used the brand, Cento, because it did not have preservatives. I bought a large can of crushed tomatoes, and a large can of tomato puree. I put in the two with an equal amount of water for each can. This could feed a family, or last you for days.

3. Then I add a healthy amount of oregano; a chopped garlic clove; some garlic powder; a few thyme leaves; a few chopped up basil leaves; some salt and pepper; a few bay leaves, and a lot of chopped parsley.

4. I cooked it on medium to low depending on how hot it was getting, and stirred about every 5 mins for a half-hour to 45 minutes.

Salento
23-01-19, 03:32
Looks good.

Since they are Lobster Ravioli I would aim to a milder sauce. :)

I wouldn’t use the onions, the extra garlic powder (cos of the fresh), the tomato puree (cos of the chopped tomatoes and it would also strengthen the sauce), the basil (Parsley only for this), and lower the amount of oregano.

Best Enjoyed with a Vino Rosè. :smile:

Jovialis
23-01-19, 23:01
Looks good.

Since they are Lobster Ravioli I would aim to a milder sauce. :)

I wouldn’t use the onions, the extra garlic powder (cos of the fresh), the tomato puree (cos of the chopped tomatoes and it would also strengthen the sauce), the basil (Parsley only for this), and lower the amount of oregano.

Best Enjoyed with a Vino Rosè. :smile:

I next want to learn how to make braciole, to add to the sauce. Especially the pork skin one:

https://i.imgur.com/R3FKlr9.jpg

Salento
23-01-19, 23:52
I next want to learn how to make braciole, to add to the sauce. Especially the pork skin one:

https://i.imgur.com/R3FKlr9.jpg


The image shows the Braciole on the plate still with the kitchen twine.
Braciole should never be served with twine or toothpicks.

I'm not sure but it's probably illegal. :-)

Remove it after the first or second step of cooking. The Braciole should hold their Shape.

Wanderer
24-01-19, 02:27
Rule 1 for pizza. Always add ham and pineapple

Thorbjorn
24-01-19, 19:56
I love this thread. It's bringing out the Italian and Sicilian in me. :laughing:


The image shows the Braciole on the plate still with the kitchen twine.
Braciole should never be served with twine or toothpicks.

I'm not sure but it's probably illegal. :-)

Remove it after the first or second step of cooking. The Braciole should hold their Shape.

È vero. My mother used to untwine the bracciole at the table, in the meat plate. And the cotena too (I think that's how it's spelled, the pork skin).

Meatballs always made with rehydrated stale Italian bread loaf. None of this white bread or breadcrumbs. That's "middigan" as they said. My sister inherited (filched?) my mother's "shcolamaccarone". Yes, Caserta dialect. And we fried leftover MACARONI, not pasta, it's MACARONI! :laughing::laughing::laughing:

It makes ya proud to be Italian.

Jovialis
24-01-19, 20:12
I also want to try to make tomato sauce with lobster for fettuccine. It is a simple recipe, but the main thing is to use the taste of the lobsters. As they cook, they will release water from inside of their shells that will give the sauce an excellent flavor. My grandmother used to make it around Easter time.

This is how I was told it should be done:

· Add olive oil and 10 garlic cloves to large pot.
· Add two live lobsters, and cook in pot until they are red.
· Add 2 or 3 large cans of tomato sauce (Add some water, if lobsters yield too little of their own)
· Add some salt
· Cook for 30 minutes

Salento
25-01-19, 00:21
After browning the garlic in the olive oil, add about 1 or 2 inches of water and a bit of salt, now add the the Lobster and keep the lid of the pot closed (just in case the Lobster get free and tries to escape. :grin:)

ps not a pretty sight ... :petrified:

Jovialis
15-02-19, 17:48
I also want to try to make tomato sauce with lobster for fettuccine. It is a simple recipe, but the main thing is to use the taste of the lobsters. As they cook, they will release water from inside of their shells that will give the sauce an excellent flavor. My grandmother used to make it around Easter time.

This is how I was told it should be done:

· Add olive oil and 10 garlic cloves to large pot.
· Add two live lobsters, and cook in pot until they are red.
· Add 2 or 3 large cans of tomato sauce (Add some water, if lobsters yield too little of their own)
· Add some salt
· Cook for 30 minutes

https://i.imgur.com/lLxzL1L.jpg

I made this sauce using two 2lb lobsters for fettuccine, yesterday. It was really delicious! It came out exactly like the way my grandmother does it, which was my goal.

Wanderer
27-02-19, 21:24
Praise, Ramen!

Angela
09-03-19, 18:11
How not to make fettucine alfredo.

These Italian chefs are not happy with what they see on youtube. I agree with them, as I made clear over a year and a half ago. "Seriously, the only thing I really object to is when people call some cockamamie bastardization of an Italian dish by the traditional name. It gives a totally wrong impression."

I would have no problem if they just called these concoctions pasta with cream sauce and...

It makes for fun watching. It's all English subtitled so you understand everything they're saying.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvXz36RFphU

How to do the real thing...go to 3:17 for the "sauce"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvXz36RFphU


This was my children's favorite then and now. I buy the fettucine at my local Italian store, which are made by hand, but I also sometimes buy the imported dried variety.

Angela
29-03-19, 20:28
Four easy pasta dishes for the first couse of Sunday dinner. Easy they are, but they're also time consuming, and almost all of them use besciamella, so this is heavy, guys. I don't like the sound of the fourth dish at all: not a fan of putting cooked ham and emmenthaler cheese in any pasta.

On the other hand, to each their own. It does show innovation is continuing. We're not completely mired in the past.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KCjt4jKqH38

Wanderer
04-04-19, 22:01
Rule 1 always add pineapples on pizza

Angela
04-04-19, 22:58
Rule 1 always add pineapples on pizza

That's a step WAY too far. :)

Still, it's your taste buds.

Angela
18-04-19, 18:55
Napoli's "Pasta alla Genovese". How it came to be called that I don't know, but the chef is right: it ranks among the best meat sauces EVER.

This is the only video I could find that was in English. There's not even any with English subtitles.

Just a few corrections because I just had to... Nonna Anna only used yellow onions. The chuck was the closest she could find to the cuts of meats she wanted, but she always chose ones with more fat. Instead of pancetta she used lard, which was the closest she could come here to strutto. She didn't at all hold with browning the meat all at once. It just boils. Do it in batches. No marjoram and especially no cayenne pepper. She also used a bit of tomato paste although the traditional recipe doesn't include it. His end product is much too watery; he should have boiled it down.

Yes, it has to simmer for 8-10 hours, but you're not doing anything to it except stirring occasionally, so you just do it when you're going to be home all day. Serve it the next day. It's even better when it sits for a day or two in the refrigerator.

This is all about how you make something delicious out of very poor, cheap ingredients.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2TJMqmscRS8

bigsnake49
18-04-19, 22:56
Nigella Lawson's take on spaghetti puttanesca. It's pretty straightforward. A lot of her recipes cater to modern British tastes, and so they run to Indian and Thai spices, as well as North African sometimes, but she does do Italian-ish and French-ish dishes as well.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KQ2iQK56cTM

I make a pretty decent salmon puttanesca.

Angela
21-04-19, 23:39
Today's primo piatto. Almost one day for the filling, a full day for the dough and making them, and for making the broth.

It's just the first course.

It's all I made, though, except for putting together the antipasto.

Still, I'm exhaused, and, to be fair, I'm in a bit of a food coma. No one is allowed to ask me for anything for the rest of the day.

Whenever I hear foreigners say Italian food is so quick and simple I want to give them a schiaffo right across the face.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V9DWxVHNGRg

davef
22-04-19, 01:25
Im in a bad spot-physically hungry without an appetite (not mentally hungry) so these threads really help

Yetos
22-04-19, 08:17
Question

Pesto with garlic? or with out?
Pesto with roasted pine coccos? or not roasted?

Angela
22-04-19, 15:39
Question

Pesto with garlic? or with out?
Pesto with roasted pine coccos? or not roasted?



Pesto isn't pesto without garlic, imo, but not very much. Americans put too much garlic in everything.

As to whether to toast the pinoli, I've never seen them toasted for this.

The oil used is extremely important. Ligurian oil is extremely light, not peppery like Tuscan oil or heavy like southern oil. You should use the least heavy oil you can find.

Enjoy. :)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mk1tiOaw0Es

We often mix boiled potatoes and green beans with the trofie pasta and dress the whole thing with pesto.

https://www.checucino.it/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/trofie-pesto.jpg

Regio X
23-04-19, 01:35
Just saw this. Haven't find another thread for it. :)

https://youtu.be/APQy9SgMMEw

Angela
23-04-19, 02:19
Acqua cotta for Toscana, though? Maybe bistecca alla fiorentina, or ribollita, or crostini di fegato or biscotti?
https://9woclymefe-flywheel.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/Bistecca-Alla-Fiorentina.jpg

Ribollita is more like a potage or a vegetable stew than like minestrone, which I NEVER order in American restaurants.
http://blog.giallozafferano.it/lacucinadibarbarin/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/IMG_1286.jpg

Crostini:
http://1.citynews-firenzetoday.stgy.ovh/~media/original-hi/12487008455280/525565_384864208200444_401351754_n-2.jpg
For Emilia/Romagna there are too many so it was an impossible choice...tagliatelle alla bolognese, lasagne, and on and on.

Lasagne:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=myxFMY8FqOk

That's how it's done...my only complaint, signora, is that you should have put more sauce...it came out too dry.

Same for Campania. It's a shame to reduce it to pizza.

Liguria would have to be something with pesto if you're going to choose just one, so that was ok.

I guess it's the nature of a list like this.

For Lombardia cotoletta alla milanese has to be a close runner up. Probably one of my favorite meat dishes.

http://www.profumodibasilico.it/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Cotolette-alla-milanese-2000x1250-752x440.jpg

I prefer it like that, but a lot of people prefer the thinner, butterflied version: not for one, of course.

http://www.conoscounposto.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Al-Garghet-Milano_cotoletta.jpg

Regio X
23-04-19, 02:34
@Angela
Yes. The purpose was to choose just one per region. I'm sure it's not easy to do it, especially in Italy. :)
I loved the images of the video I posted, btw.
Dish chosen for Lazio seems especially great.
As for pizza, Margherita is my favorite. Pizza is really an emblematic "dish" of Campania, isn't it?

This was my favorite dish at childhood: agnolini soup. Brodo has "carne lessa" (boiled in water):
https://destemperados.clicrbs.com.br/arquivos/ckeditor/C6t9PdrWVBCFbW6zP7r/5b58cf98514f33.72816811.JPG

Angela
02-06-19, 18:58
This is one of the few videos I've found on youtube which show a decent version of how to make Italian-American tomato meat "gravy" for pasta.

Nonna Anna's meatballs had pork and were much softer than those look to be, maybe partly because she handles the meat too much. The bones she sautees are pork and beef bones.

If you're using cans of imported peeled whole plum tomatoes from Naples, you'd add olive oil to warm pan, saute onion and garlic, then add the tomatoes (which you've broken up a bit by hand), and simmer until it breaks down into a sauce. Add some basil too. Or, you could buy cans of imported Italian pureed tomatoes.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NFnKaAnXQiY&t=1194s

Angela
16-06-19, 18:28
Foreigners try "Real Genovese" pesto, not the overly garlickly stuff they sell here.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ce9keG6RHfE

booo90
07-07-19, 17:30
Hello!!
This is nice!

booo90
07-07-19, 17:52
Hi Everyone! I know best lasagna recipes.
Check it here - https://club.cooking/recipe-category/lasagna/
Homemade Lasagna, Vegetable, Mushroom,Cabbage, Turkey, Meat and Healthy Lasagna
You will like it! https://club.cooking/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/Cabbage-Lasagna-prev-360x203.jpg
Enjoy

Angela
12-08-19, 15:33
This series is the only Buzz Feed content I watch: it's about food, no politics, and it sometimes helps out small restaurants.

I love lasagna, and this showcases it.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PbQyevYlLAY

If I'm to be honest, however, I think the "winner" put way too much tomato in the "Bolognese" sauce, and too much sauce in the lasagna.

To me, this is what the finished product is supposed to look like, but perhaps that's partly a reflection of how they make it in my area.

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/m6rBHv9zZYY/hqdefault.jpg

We eat the green version a lot too:

http://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/05/34/13/54/ristorante-pizzeria-il.jpg

Regio X
08-09-19, 02:06
È morto Giacomo Bulleri:

https://www.ilgiorno.it/milano/cronaca/giacomo-bulleri-morto-1.4771432

Tpl
09-09-19, 16:54
hello everybody am Tpl for Thapelo