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Angela
29-08-17, 22:41
Tribal mating, I guess, even if the "tribes" are just substructure in one population, and they're relatively recent tribes at that.

See: Emily T. Norris et al "Assortative mating on ancestry-variant traits in admixed Latin American populations"
http://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2017/08/17/177634


"Background:

Assortative mating is a universal feature of human societies, and individuals from ethnically diverse populations are known to mate assortatively based on similarities in genetic ancestry. However, little is currently known regarding the exact phenotypic cues, or their underlying genetic architecture, which inform ancestry-based assortative mating.

Results31:

We developed a novel approach, using genome-wide analysis of ancestry-specific haplotypes, to evaluate ancestry-based assortative mating on traits whose expression varies among the three continental population groups – African, European, and Native American – that admixed to form modern Latin American populations. Application of this method to genome sequences sampled from Colombia, Mexico, Peru, and Puerto Rico revealed widespread ancestry-based assortative mating. We discovered a number of anthropometric traits (body mass, height, facial development and waist-hip ratio) and neurological attributes (educational attainment and schizophrenia) that serve as phenotypic cues for ancestry-based assortative mating. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) loci show population-specific patterns of both39 assortative and disassortative mating in Latin America. Ancestry-based assortative mating in the populations analyzed here appears to be driven primarily by African ancestry."

bicicleur
31-08-17, 18:44
We discovered a number of anthropometric traits (body mass, height, facial development and waist-hip ratio) and neurological attributes (educational attainment and schizophrenia) that serve as phenotypic cues for ancestry-based assortative mating.

I guess the mating is intertribal but with tribes with similar phenotypic traits.

Angela
31-08-17, 21:34
We discovered a number of anthropometric traits (body mass, height, facial development and waist-hip ratio) and neurological attributes (educational attainment and schizophrenia) that serve as phenotypic cues for ancestry-based assortative mating.

I guess the mating is intertribal but with tribes with similar phenotypic traits.

The only one that I thought was bizarre was "schizophrenia". I can't see how there would be any positive selection for it.

Jovialis
01-09-17, 19:21
The only one that I thought was bizarre was "schizophrenia". I can't see how there would be any positive selection for it.

http://i.imgur.com/0yXnD83.jpg


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4031576/

Religion and spirituality exert a significant role in the lives of many individuals, including people with schizophrenia. However, the contribution of religion and spirituality to various domains (psychopathology, explanatory models, treatment seeking, treatment adherence, outcome, etc.) has not received much attention. In this article, we review the exiting data with regards to the relationship of religion, spirituality, and various domains in patients with schizophrenia. Available evidence suggests that for some patients, religion instills hope, purpose, and meaning in their lives, whereas for others, it induces spiritual despair. Patients with schizophrenia also exhibit religious delusions and hallucinations. Further, there is some evidence to suggest that religion influences the level of psychopathology. Religion and religious practices also influence social integration, risk of suicide attempts, and substance use. Religion and spirituality also serves as an effective method of coping with the illness. Religion also influences the treatment compliance and outcome in patients with schizophrenia.

Schizophrenics and people on the spectrum of Schizophrenia are known for their high religiosity. Perhaps this plays a part in drawing people with similar personalities together within those communities; wanting to marry within their religion. There's also other traits such as aloofness, exhibited in schizophrenia. There's situations in which being aloof can fuel desire.



https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-attraction-doctor/201403/when-should-you-play-hard-get
Researchers Dai, Dong, and Jia (2014) investigated the question, "When does playing hard to get increase romantic attraction?" They theorized that such an aloof strategy may have unique effects on different emotions. Specifically, they suggested that playing hard to get might increase feelings of "wanting" in others (a desire to pursue the aloof person) but at the same time decrease "liking" (positive feelings about the person).

Perhaps this also helps to explain the higher than average divorce rate among African-Americans, and to a lesser extent Hispanics. Despite the increase of wanting, the relationship would be difficult because they wouldn't actually like the person they're with.



The first divorce rates of white and Hispanic women were similar at 16.3 and 18.1, respectively. African-American women have substantially higher rates of first divorce compared to all other racial and ethnic groups, at 30.4 divorces per 1,000 women in a first marriage
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111103161830.htm

bicicleur
01-09-17, 19:53
http://i.imgur.com/0yXnD83.jpg



Schizophrenics and people on the spectrum of Schizophrenia are known for their high religiosity. Perhaps this plays a part in drawing people with similar personalities together within those communities; wanting to marry within their religion. There's also other traits such as aloofness, exhibited in schizophrenia. There's situations in which being aloof can fuel desire.



Perhaps this also helps to explain the higher than average divorce rate among African-Americans, and to a lesser extent Hispanics. Despite the increase of wanting, the relationship would be difficult because they wouldn't actually like the person they're with.

I guess today religion is a big factor in partner selection.
Especialy for Jews and Muslims.
Another factor are the arranged marriages where the girl even doesn't get the chance to chose.

Jovialis
01-09-17, 20:06
I guess today religion is a big factor in partner selection.
Especialy for Jews and Muslims.
Another factor are the arranged marriages where the girl even doesn't get the chance to chose.

Based on this study, I guess people that have schizoid traits would be attracted to one another. I guess the other traits would play into the difficulty with marriage (i.e. mistrust, keeping grudges, easily offended, the desire for being solitary, uninterested in others). Two individuals that exhibit these traits sounds like a recipe for disaster.

Angela
01-09-17, 21:46
One of those traits doesn't make a schizophrenic, though. I can't count the number of times I have been called aloof, but thanks to 23andme I know I don't have any of those genes for mental disorders. Sometimes aloof is another way to say reserved or private.

@Bicicleur,
I do think some of these researchers don't pay enough attention to the fact that assortative mating often leads back to the cultural prejudices of the parents. I constantly hear from Puerto Ricans that parents and grandparents are very against them marrying anyone "darker". That's important in a culture stratified by "color".

Sometimes it's even marriage into sub-cultures that parents try to prevent. I'm ashamed to say that my first cousin once removed in Italy had a hell of a time when she wanted to marry a boy whose parents had moved into the area from southern Italy. The tug of war went on for years, with them finally giving up because she was getting older, and they were afraid she would get sick. Meanwhile, she was lucky to get him, in my opinion: he's infinitely nicer, and much better looking.

It sounds mid-Victorian and ridiculous, I know, but in more conservative areas parents and grandparents controlled marriages until very recently.

Jovialis
01-09-17, 22:02
One of those traits doesn't make a schizophrenic, though. I can't count the number of times I have been called aloof, but thanks to 23andme I know I don't have any of those genes for mental disorders. Sometimes aloof is another way to say reserved or private.

@Bicicleur,
I do think some of these researchers don't pay enough attention to the fact that assortative mating often leads back to the cultural prejudices of the parents. I constantly hear from Puerto Ricans that parents and grandparents are very against them marrying anyone "darker". That's important in a culture stratified by "color".

Sometimes it's even marriage into sub-cultures that parents try to prevent. I'm ashamed to say that my first cousin once removed in Italy had a hell of a time when she wanted to marry a boy whose parents had moved into the area from southern Italy. The tug of war went on for years, with them finally giving up because she was getting older, and they were afraid she would get sick. Meanwhile, she was lucky to get him, in my opinion: he's infinitely nicer, and much better looking.

It sounds mid-Victorian and ridiculous, I know, but in more conservative areas parents and grandparents controlled marriages until very recently.

Sounds like my ex-girlfriend's parents. They were German and Scottish. I didn't care though, I'm not sleeping with them. But when she told me she didn't like Italian food, it was the final straw. lol

I don't think being aloof is exclusive to the disorder. I can be that way as well. But it's a hallmark of Schizophrenia.

Angela
01-09-17, 22:06
Sounds like my ex-girlfriend's parents. They were German and Scottish. I didn't care though, I'm not sleeping with them. But when she told me she didn't like Italian food, it was the final straw. lol

OMG, THAT'S A TOTAL DEAL-BREAKER!:angry::laughing:

Joking aside, that really would have been a deal breaker! That and not appreciating my family and how close we are. NO, no, no.

Jovialis
01-09-17, 22:12
OMG, THAT'S A TOTAL DEAL-BREAKER!:angry::laughing:

Joking aside, that really would have been a deal breaker! That and not appreciating my family and how close we are. NO, no, no.

I don't know how much the mother didn't like me though. When ever I would go to kiss her the cheek, should would sort of move her mouth into the way... :confused2:

I don't know where she got her looks from, but the mom looked like a beast.

davef
02-09-17, 07:51
I don't know how much the mother didn't like me though. When ever I would go to kiss her the cheek, should would sort of move her mouth into the way... :confused2:

I don't know where she got her looks from, but the mom looked like a beast.
Its unusual for someone to not like Italian food. But if I had a girl and she and her parents loved me enough (and if she enjoys Mexican food with lots of nacho cheese, salsa, and guacamole) I'd keep her around (and go to Italian restaurants on my own free time).

Remember, when in doubt, there's always Mexican food.