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Angela
29-09-17, 18:05
Very.

See:
http://time.com/4956316/how-much-of-autism-is-genetic/

I don't see how dropping from 90% to 83% is much of a change, but whatever.

This certainly doesn't match my own individual observations. I've almost never seen a family in which there's more than one autistic child, or where the parents exhibit any of the signs, although it could be further back, I'm sure. Also, in a good number of the parents I've seen who have autistic or severely developmentally delayed children, I know there's been a lot of drug use, particularly by the father.

Sennevini
30-09-17, 11:19
Maybe it depends on the severity of the condition; it is a broad spectrum; in my family there are several people who can be described as highly intelligent, leaning towards Asperger, I think in such "less severe" cases, people are more likely to maintain a relatively normal family life than people with classical autism, therefore just giving through their genes.

lee1962
08-11-17, 12:21
I've got Asperger's syndrome, a form of autism, and I believe there is certainly a genetic element to it...however I also believe that the main cause is lack of vitamin D in mothers. I don't think it's merely coincidental that autism is most common in people with a north western European heritage...an area that gets very little bright sunshine, which is important in the production of vitamin D by our bodies.

Seanp
12-11-17, 19:14
I do see a correlation between the growth of artificial foods, chemicals and mental health related disorders, which isn't only limited to humanity but today even scientists admit you can't be sure to not get poisoned by the fish you eat from the Sea. Even fishes living in the deep sea waters already have measurable levels of poison chemicals within their meat, other than that there's already a Belgium sized trash island swimming on the Pacific ocean which is quite scary to say the least.

firetown
12-11-17, 19:19
The autism epidemic began when the Anti-D shot for rhesus negative women pregnant with a rhesus positive fetus was approved. And the issue was not so much the shot itself as was the standard operating procedure and time the shot was administered. Rather than giving it before a pregnancy, women would receive it during the pregnancy allowing the antibodies to damage the fetus before the shot was given. That included causing serious damage to the brain cells as well.

Before the shot was approved, such fetus would eventually be completely destroyed. But then the already damaged fetus was saved from dying and often resulted in a child with sometimes severe issues.

Expredel
13-11-17, 22:03
The chickenpox vaccine also closely matches the autism rise. In this scenario it is partially genetic.