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Jovialis
28-01-18, 16:28
Many researchers assume the first life on Earth evolved in hot springs. A new study provides insights into how one type of extremophile microbe may have moved from hot springs to conquer more moderate environments across the globe. The first-ever analysis of DNA of one ammonia-oxidizing hot-spring microbe living today reveals that evolution of the necessary adaptations may have been helped by highly mobile genetic elements and DNA exchange with a variety of other organisms.

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Extremophiles -- hardy organisms living in places that would kill most life on Earth -- provide fascinating insights into evolution, metabolism and even possible extraterrestrial life. A new study provides insights into how one type of extremophile, a heat-loving microbe that uses ammonia for energy production, may have been able to make the transition from hot springs to more moderate environments across the globe. The first-ever analysis of DNA of a contemporary heat-loving, ammonia-oxidizing organism, published in open-access journal Frontiers in Microbiology, reveals that evolution of the necessary adaptations may have been helped by highly mobile genetic elements and DNA exchange with a variety of other organisms.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180126085437.htm

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2018.00028/full

I believe it is likely that extremophiles able to withstand the vacuum of space arrived via meteorites, and seeded the earth with life.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panspermia