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Angela
06-02-18, 00:33
Maybe they do.

See:

"here’s another reason few Chinese consumers buy deodorant: basic biology.Scientists in recent years have shown that many East Asians, a group that includes China’s ethnic Han majority, have a gene that lowers the likelihood of a strong “human axillary odor” — scientist-speak for body stink.
That lowers the likelihood that they will use deodorant to begin with, according to a 2013 study by researchers at the University of Bristol and Brunel University in Britain, after a survey of nearly 6,500 women of various backgrounds.
“It is likely that deodorant usage is not widely adopted because there is, for much of the East Asia population, no need for it,” it said. (For those curious about such matters, that same genetic difference also leads to drier earwax.)"

The derived snp in question isABCC11. The G is ancestral or strong body odor.

https://www.gnxp.com/WordPress/2018/02/03/why-the-chinese-dont-buy-deodorant/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

Here is the paper:

A missense variant of the ABCC11 gene is associated with Axillary Osmidrosis susceptibility and clinical phenotypes in the Chinese Han Population (https://www.nature.com/articles/srep46335.pdf), which explicitly probes the correlation between body odor (“Axillary Osmidrosis”) and the SNP in question in the Han Chinese population.

"If you dig into the frequencies it seems that the derived mutation is absent among populations in Africa without recent Eurasian back-migration. I looked it up, and it’s segregating in ancient Eurasian samples, with Ust Ishim being a heterozygote. It is curious that in no population has the derived frequency swept to fixation, nor has the ancestral variant fixed in other groups (such as in Europe).
I strongly doubt that there is any selection on this locus due to earwax or body odor. It is a pleiotropic locus, there are other effects from the mutation. One of those other effects is probably the target of any selection. And in regards to selection, it seems likely that that would be a balancing sort since neither the ancestral nor the derived variant are fixed in most populations."

You should read the comments.

I found the comment about the lack of perfume use there also interesting. No body odor to mask, but perhaps none to enhance either.

Also, just for some common sense, even if you have a tendency to have lower body odor, if you're not hygienic for long enough, you will have body odor. It's a question of degree. Diet is also a big factor. The Chinese in certain regions love garlic. Eat enough of it and it will ooze out of your pores no matter who you are. The same is true for other spices, or for beer or any number of other things.

This is the snp involved: rs17822931-A

T equals A at 23andme.

This is more complicated because, as they say in one of the comments, this is a polygenic trait not determined by one snp. I'm homozygous for "C" or "G" ancestral, and I almost never use either deoderant or anti-antiperspirant, and never have done. There's never been the need to put all those chemicals on my body as I figured out as a teen-ager that I didn't need them unless I was going to be running or working in the yard. My daughter says I'm not human. Even my shoes don't have a bad odor. :)

davef
06-02-18, 00:51
I probably have the worst BO on this forum, i need to abuse the speed stick otherwise my stench covers a 50 ft radius

edit: I think it also stems from what I eat

Salento
06-02-18, 01:44
I probably have the worst BO on this forum, i need to abuse the speed stick otherwise my stench covers a 50 ft radius

edit: I think it also stems from what I eat

Have you ever been stuck in an elevator, or a cab with somebody from ........; OMG
I’ve been told that is food they eat that cause it. But I think that they don’t shower daily either. [emoji2]

davef
06-02-18, 04:59
I shower 3x per week and rarely brush at all but my teeth are healthy and I rarely get sick from bad hygiene. I can do what I want, it's my digestive tract and brain that's screwy

Ygorcs
06-02-18, 07:35
Oh my God. I sometimes shower 3x a DAY, in genera at least twice! LOL. But I think that having a mostly European and African ancestry and living in a tropical and very sunny place, like I do, naturally inclines a society to develop such habits. Otherwise, people like me would stench really bad. Brazilians are consistently the people that takes showers more often in the whole word in the surveys about personal hygiene, with an average around ~12-13 showers per week.

It's certainly partly due to the climate, but also a very strongly enforced custom (yes, people will stigmatize somebody very openly and even mock someone if he or she doesn't look or smell clean enough for their high standards). The hot sunny climate can't be the sole explanation since, if I'm not mistaken, Russians apparently take a bath much more often than Indians on average (and the worst in that survey which I read were... the British - yes, not the French!).

bicicleur
06-02-18, 08:54
I think the food that you consume or if you have enough exercise will influence your body odor more than your genes.
I have been in Korea once and they all smelled very strong because of some ginger-like spices they eat all the time.
Whenever I took an elevator, I held my breath during the whole ride.

Angela
06-02-18, 17:55
Oh my God. I sometimes shower 3x a DAY, in genera at least twice! LOL. But I think that having a mostly European and African ancestry and living in a tropical and very sunny place, like I do, naturally inclines a society to develop such habits. Otherwise, people like me would stench really bad. Brazilians are consistently the people that takes showers more often in the whole word in the surveys about personal hygiene, with an average around ~12-13 showers per week.

It's certainly partly due to the climate, but also a very strongly enforced custom (yes, people will stigmatize somebody very openly and even mock someone if he or she doesn't look or smell clean enough for their high standards). The hot sunny climate can't be the sole explanation since, if I'm not mistaken, Russians apparently take a bath much more often than Indians on average (and the worst in that survey which I read were... the British - yes, not the French!).

Here you go...

Americans, like the French, shower about once a day on average. The Brazilians are indeed the world leaders. :)

https://media.treehugger.com/assets/images/2015/02/euromonitor.jpg

https://qph.ec.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-9b1c82766a35666358d79748a4c50fcb

Having taken the tube in London, I can confirm the above. I think some countries need to get on the stick here. :) I never understood the whole "French" thing. I'm there very often, and they're generally very well groomed. It must be a holdover from the past.

I think people must get nose blind in certain areas. They probably literally can't smell the body odor any more. I don't know how they can miss the stringy, greasy hair and bad skin though.

Food smells, i.e. spices, beer etc. coming out of the pores are very distinct from the smell of actual body odor. I do think the latter is highly individual for whatever reason. It's terrible to say, but even after a work out, some people just stink more than others.

Ygorcs
07-02-18, 21:42
I have also heard some horror stories about taking the subway in crowded areas of London, too. LOL But strangely enough, if body odour is thought to be mostly caused by that ancestral allele, and not just as determined by other alleles (a veritably polygenic trait), I have also heard from fellow Brazilians awful accounts of the sour stench in the subways of Japan and Korea. And they also told me that apparently nobody felt the same, they were the only ones seeming to complain about the heavy odour coming from everywhere in the tube. I guess the strict Brazilian habits of hygiene (not only showers; for instance many people in my family regularly use perfume even inside their own homes, when they won't meet anybody but their own relatives), ended up making us particularly sensitive to any degree of body odour.

davef
07-02-18, 21:47
I think this study has to do with natural odor and not how you smell after eating certain foods.

Angela
07-02-18, 21:59
I have also heard some horror stories about taking the subway in crowded areas of London, too. LOL But strangely enough, if body odour is thought to be mostly caused by that ancestral allele, and not just as determined by other alleles (a veritably polygenic trait), I have also heard from fellow Brazilians awful accounts of the sour stench in the subways of Japan and Korea. And they also told me that apparently nobody felt the same, they were the only ones seeming to complain about the heavy odour coming from everywhere in the tube. I guess the strict Brazilian habits of hygiene (not only showers; for instance many people in my family regularly use perfume even inside their own homes, when they won't meet anybody but their own relatives), ended up making us particularly sensitive to any degree of body odour.

That's nose blindness for you, I guess.

I think it probably is polygenic, going by my own results.

However, perhaps what your friends noticed was from the food consumed.

I've told this story before, so ignore if you've read it. Our insurance guy, Irish, has an inordinate love of garlic, which is not really typical of Irish descent people in my experience. He blames it on a Sicilian wife. :)

We were away on vacation and had gone to an Italian restaurant the night before. I don't use much garlic, because more than a little bit disagrees with me. Having smelled the plates going by I asked if they could go weaker on the garlic for me. Not Gerry. He asked for EXTRA garlic. The next morning we were the first ones down and shared an elevator. Two people got on at the next floor and immediately said, "What's that awful smell?!" We studiously avoided looking at each other until they got off and then burst out laughing. I told you so, I said. Now, everybody is going to walk five feet away from us. :)

I'm that way about unfamiliar food smells too. Sorry to say, but I really don't like the smell of Indian spices, and I can't stand the sour smell people, especially men get after drinking a lot of beer.

Until I read your post and investigated I thought my husband was the only person who routinely took two to three showers a day: morning before work, after sports, again later in the evening. He always wears men's cologne, and all shirts or tops have to be freshly laundered. Even suits are dry cleaned constantly. He's fired people because he thinks they don't smell "fresh". I think he may have an overdeveloped sense of smell. :) I always have to air out the house after cooking too.

I tell him it's actually not supposed to be good to wash your whole body more than once a day: it supposedly dries the skin. He just moisturizes. :)

Personally, as an Italian, I'm sorry, but I consider any country without bidets to be unhygienic. :)