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Leo Achaicus
10-05-18, 13:22
Hello guys,

My name is Leo and I come from Patras, province of Achaea, North-West Peloponnesus. The Peloponnesus is the hand-shaped peninsula in S Greece home of the ancient city-states Patrae, Aegion, Corinthos, Mycynae, Sparta, Pylos and Argos and also home of the ancient Achaean Confederacy.

All my ancestors come from the Peloponnesus too (or so I thought), more specifically from Elea, Arcadia and Achaea.

I am very excited and I must say that my results were unexpected. I thought that perhaps I'd discover some exotic ancestry but this is not the case at all.

I am 99.2% European, 0.6% "Broadly West Asian and North African", and 0.2% "unassigned".

More specifically:

Balkan - Greece (exact wording): 86.2%
Italian: 9.4%
Broadly Southern European: 3.6%
West Asian & North African: 0.6%
Unassigned: 0.2%

Details:
=====
Sardinian, Iberian, British/Irish, Scandinavian, Finnish, Franco-German, Eastern European, Ashkenazi, Broadly NW European= 0% ZERO
Sub-Saharan African = 0% ZERO
South Asian = 0% ZERO
East Asian/Native American = 0% ZERO
Melanesian = 0% ZERO

"23nadme" discovered that I have one Italian ancestor, "who was 100% Italian", who was born "between 1760 and 1850". This is not much of a mystery, as my mother's grandfather was surnamed "Golfinopoulos" which is, of course, not a Greek surname. So I surmise that I have one "2nd, 3rd, 4th or 5th Great-Grandparent who was 100% Italian" who was surnamed Golfino and he came to Greece probably as a volunteer to fight with the Greek revolutionaries during the Greek War of Independence (1821-1829).

QUOTE
Italy offers a particularly important vantage point for understanding the force of philhellenism in nineteenth-century Europe. Tracing the contribution of Italians to the struggles for Greek independence from the war of 1820 - 21 to the war between Greece and Turkey in 1897, this article shows how Italian support for the philhellenist cause illustrates the internationalist context of Risorgimento nationalism. After Unification the philhellenist cause offered the opportunity to continue the tradition of volunteers enlisting to fight against tyranny and oppression abroad. This culminated in the volunteer expedition to fight with the Greeks against the Turks in 1897 led by Ricciotti Garibaldi - son of the hero of Italian Unification. But that expedition also marked the end of the nineteenth-century international volunteer movement. In Italy many socialists and nationalists were opposed to it, in part because it was seen as a diversion from political struggles that needed to be fought at home and in part because the project of the nation in arms was less and less realistic in the context of late nineteenth-century geopolitics. But at its height, the international volunteer movement - to which Italy made a major contribution - was an act of political idealism that drew on appeals to the unity of Greco-Latin civilization.
UNQUOTE

QUOTE
In the summer of 1821, various young men from all Europe began to gather in the French port of Marseilles to book a passage to Greece and join the revolution.[83] The French philhellene Jean-François-Maxime Raybaud wrote when he heard of the revolution in March 1821, "I learnt with a thrill that Greece was shaking off her chains" and in July 1821 boarded a ship going to Greece.[83] Between the summer of 1821 and end of 1822, when the French started to inspect ships leaving Marseilles for philhellenes, some 360 volunteers travelled to Greece.[84] From the United States came the doctor Samuel Gridley Howe and the soldier George Jarvis to fight with the Greeks.[85] The largest contingents came from the German states, France and the Italian states.[84] In Nafplio, a monument to honor the philhellenes who died fighting in the war listed 274 names, of which 100 are from Germany, forty each from France and Italy, and the rest from Britain, Spain, Hungary, Sweden, Portugal and Denmark.[86]
UNQUOTE

Note that I am Orthodox, not Catholic, which means that my Italian grandfather switched allegiance to the Greek Orthodox Church after settling in Greece, probably near Patras. There is a history of this happening with many Italians (Venetians, Genoans and others) who chose to settle in Greece.

If it wasn't for my Italian grandfather, I'd be presumably 99.2% Balkan-Greece.

According to 23andme, I have 410 "Balkan" relatives (who are 99% Greek or Western Euros/US citizens with one Greek parent) and 335 Italian relatives still living today. These two groups constitute the two biggest groups of my relatives.

I am especially proud I have 0% Slav in my DNA, as I have been listening to the BS written by Fallmerayer (or w/e this is spelt) since I was a kid and I am now 42, propagated by the freaking Greek Communists who tried to convince us (I think they call this brain-washing) that WE MUST BE SLAVS because the Greeks died out 2000 tears ago. So much BS. I am glad there's 23andme.

I hope you found this post interesting. Please ask away and I will reply.

All the best.

Leo Achaicus
10-05-18, 16:01
After a bit of web searching, I learned that the correct Italian spelling of my ancestor's surname is "Giolfino" and this family comes from Verona.

Ironically enough, my brother's wife (surnamed Fouskarini) is descended from the Venetian Foscarini family, which means that my brother's baby who was born two weeks ago, will have Italian ancestry from both parents. OoOo

We had no idea we had any Italian ancestry, so my brother ofc didn't plan marrying his wife based on ancestry, it was all random. Isn't life so very strange?

Tutkun Arnaut
10-05-18, 17:01
[QUOTE=Leo Achaicus;541784]Hello guys,

My name is Leo and I come from Patras, province of Achaea, North-West Peloponnesus. The Peloponnesus is the hand-shaped peninsula in S Greece home of the ancient city-states Patrae, Aegion, Corinthos, Mycynae, Sparta, Pylos and Argos and also home of the ancient Achaean Confederacy.

All my ancestors come from the Peloponnesus too (or so I thought), more specifically from Elea, Arcadia and Achaea.

Hello guys,

My name is Leo and I come from Patras, province of Achaea, North-West Peloponnesus. The Peloponnesus is the hand-shaped peninsula in S Greece home of the ancient city-states Patrae, Aegion, Corinthos, Mycynae, Sparta, Pylos and Argos and also home of the ancient Achaean Confederacy.

All my ancestors come from the Peloponnesus too (or so I thought), more specifically from Elea, Arcadia and Achaea.

I am very excited and I must say that my results were unexpected. I thought that perhaps I'd discover some exotic ancestry but this is not the case at all.

I am 99.2% European, 0.6% "Broadly West Asian and North African", and 0.2% "unassigned".

More specifically:

Balkan - Greece (exact wording): 86.2%
Italian: 9.4%
Broadly Southern European: 3.6%
West Asian & North African: 0.6%
Unassigned: 0.2%

Details:
=====
Sardinian, Iberian, British/Irish, Scandinavian, Finnish, Franco-German, Eastern European, Ashkenazi, Broadly NW European= 0% ZERO
Sub-Saharan African = 0% ZERO
South Asian = 0% ZERO
East Asian/Native American = 0% ZERO
Melanesian = 0% ZERO

"23nadme" discovered that I have one Italian ancestor, "who was 100% Italian", who was born "between 1760 and 1850". This is not much of a mystery, as my mother's grandfather was surnamed "Golfinopoulos" which is, of course, not a Greek surname. So I surmise that I have one "2nd, 3rd, 4th or 5th Great-Grandparent who was 100% Italian" who was surnamed Golfino and he came to Greece probably as a volunteer to fight with the Greek revolutionaries during the Greek War of Independence (1821-1829).

QUOTE
Italy offers a particularly important vantage point for understanding the force of philhellenism in nineteenth-century Europe. Tracing the contribution of Italians to the struggles for Greek independence from the war of 1820 - 21 to the war between Greece and Turkey in 1897, this article shows how Italian support for the philhellenist cause illustrates the internationalist context of Risorgimento nationalism. After Unification the philhellenist cause offered the opportunity to continue the tradition of volunteers enlisting to fight against tyranny and oppression abroad. This culminated in the volunteer expedition to fight with the Greeks against the Turks in 1897 led by Ricciotti Garibaldi - son of the hero of Italian Unification. But that expedition also marked the end of the nineteenth-century international volunteer movement. In Italy many socialists and nationalists were opposed to it, in part because it was seen as a diversion from political struggles that needed to be fought at home and in part because the project of the nation in arms was less and less realistic in the context of late nineteenth-century geopolitics. But at its height, the international volunteer movement - to which Italy made a major contribution - was an act of political idealism that drew on appeals to the unity of Greco-Latin civilization.
UNQUOTE

QUOTE
In the summer of 1821, various young men from all Europe began to gather in the French port of Marseilles to book a passage to Greece and join the revolution.[83] The French philhellene Jean-François-Maxime Raybaud wrote when he heard of the revolution in March 1821, "I learnt with a thrill that Greece was shaking off her chains" and in July 1821 boarded a ship going to Greece.[83] Between the summer of 1821 and end of 1822, when the French started to inspect ships leaving Marseilles for philhellenes, some 360 volunteers travelled to Greece.[84] From the United States came the doctor Samuel Gridley Howe and the soldier George Jarvis to fight with the Greeks.[85] The largest contingents came from the German states, France and the Italian states.[84] In Nafplio, a monument to honor the philhellenes who died fighting in the war listed 274 names, of which 100 are from Germany, forty each from France and Italy, and the rest from Britain, Spain, Hungary, Sweden, Portugal and Denmark.[86]
UNQUOTE

Note that I am Orthodox, not Catholic, which means that my Italian grandfather switched allegiance to the Greek Orthodox Church after settling in Greece, probably near Patras. There is a history of this happening with many Italians (Venetians, Genoans and others) who chose to settle in Greece.

If it wasn't for my Italian grandfather, I'd be presumably 99.2% Balkan-Greece.

According to 23andme, I have 410 "Balkan" relatives (who are 99% Greek or Western Euros/US citizens with one Greek parent) and 335 Italian relatives still living today. These two groups constitute the two biggest groups of my relatives.

I am especially proud I have 0% Slav in my DNA, as I have been listening to the BS written by Fallmerayer (or w/e this is spelt) since I was a kid and I am now 42, propagated by the freaking Greek Communists who tried to convince us (I think they call this brain-washing) that WE MUST BE SLAVS because the Greeks died out 2000 tears ago. So much BS. I am glad there's 23andme.

I hope you found this post interesting. Please ask away and I will reply.

All the best.[/QU









Surprise findings! You have no Turkish genes. Usually Greeks have from 5 to 15% Caucasian which is Turkish

Leo Achaicus
10-05-18, 17:11
Honestly, I was surprised myself but then again all my ancestors (except 1 who was Italian) came specifically from the Peloponnesus and more specifically from the Central Peloponnese Highlands (Arcadia) and Achaean Highlands (Mt. Panachaikon vicinity) though they lived for sometime in a village in the Elea province (W Peloponnese). In other words, my ancestors are indigenous Peloponnesians.

I have zero ancestors from Asia Minor/Anatolia this is probably why I have absolutely nothing to do with Turkey genetically.

The Greeks you refer to are probably "Anatolites" which is how we describe in our language Greeks who emigrated to Graecia Proper from Ionia in 1922.

Tutkun Arnaut
10-05-18, 20:20
[QUOTE=Leo Achaicus;541823]Honestly, I was surprised myself but then again all my ancestors (except 1 who was Italian) came specifically from the Peloponnesus and more specifically from the Central Peloponnese Highlands (Arcadia) and Achaean Highlands (Mt. Panachaikon vicinity) though they lived for sometime in a village in the Elea province (W Peloponnese). In other words, my ancestors are indigenous Peloponnesians.

I have zero ancestors from Asia Minor/Anatolia this is probably why I have absolutely nothing to do with Turkey genetically.

The Greeks you refer to are probably "Anatolites" which is how we describe in our language Greeks who emigrated to Graecia Proper from Ionia in 1922.[/QUO


No, i am not referring Pontic Greeks. I am referring the Greeks from Greece. In general Greeks from Greece have about 10% of genes Caucasian+Middle east. Its not only Greeks its Balkans in general. Let say Kosovo Albanians I have seen have 5 to 7% Caucasian +middle east, From Tirana I have seen a few have 3 to 5% Turkish genes. So it was long Turkish presence, and its recent it did not go easy. Turkish solders were no saints.

Leo Achaicus
10-05-18, 20:39
I have found so far four 4th cousins from Italy with surnames Cerra, Pierro, Giordano and Fabiano. There is also one Spanish 4th cousin who leads to two more Spanish fifth cousins . All the rest of my relatives are Greek and some US citizens with Western Euro names who have got documented Greek ancestry.

Sile
10-05-18, 20:57
I have found so far four 4th cousins from Italy with surnames Cerra, Pierro, Giordano and Fabiano. There is also one Spanish 4th cousin who leads to two more Spanish fifth cousins . All the rest of my relatives are Greek and some US citizens with Western Euro names who have got documented Greek ancestry.
http://www.cognomix.it/mappe-dei-cognomi-italiani/CERRA
.
http://www.cognomix.it/mappe-dei-cognomi-italiani/PIERRO
.
http://www.cognomix.it/mappe-dei-cognomi-italiani/GIORDANO
.
http://www.cognomix.it/mappe-dei-cognomi-italiani/FABIANO
.
Looks like mainly calabrian

Sile
10-05-18, 21:04
[QUOTE=Leo Achaicus;541784]Hello guys,

My name is Leo and I come from Patras, province of Achaea, North-West Peloponnesus. The Peloponnesus is the hand-shaped peninsula in S Greece home of the ancient city-states Patrae, Aegion, Corinthos, Mycynae, Sparta, Pylos and Argos and also home of the ancient Achaean Confederacy.

All my ancestors come from the Peloponnesus too (or so I thought), more specifically from Elea, Arcadia and Achaea.

Hello guys,

My name is Leo and I come from Patras, province of Achaea, North-West Peloponnesus. The Peloponnesus is the hand-shaped peninsula in S Greece home of the ancient city-states Patrae, Aegion, Corinthos, Mycynae, Sparta, Pylos and Argos and also home of the ancient Achaean Confederacy.

All my ancestors come from the Peloponnesus too (or so I thought), more specifically from Elea, Arcadia and Achaea.

I am very excited and I must say that my results were unexpected. I thought that perhaps I'd discover some exotic ancestry but this is not the case at all.

I am 99.2% European, 0.6% "Broadly West Asian and North African", and 0.2% "unassigned".

More specifically:

Balkan - Greece (exact wording): 86.2%
Italian: 9.4%
Broadly Southern European: 3.6%
West Asian & North African: 0.6%
Unassigned: 0.2%

Details:
=====
Sardinian, Iberian, British/Irish, Scandinavian, Finnish, Franco-German, Eastern European, Ashkenazi, Broadly NW European= 0% ZERO
Sub-Saharan African = 0% ZERO
South Asian = 0% ZERO
East Asian/Native American = 0% ZERO
Melanesian = 0% ZERO

"23nadme" discovered that I have one Italian ancestor, "who was 100% Italian", who was born "between 1760 and 1850". This is not much of a mystery, as my mother's grandfather was surnamed "Golfinopoulos" which is, of course, not a Greek surname. So I surmise that I have one "2nd, 3rd, 4th or 5th Great-Grandparent who was 100% Italian" who was surnamed Golfino and he came to Greece probably as a volunteer to fight with the Greek revolutionaries during the Greek War of Independence (1821-1829).

QUOTE
Italy offers a particularly important vantage point for understanding the force of philhellenism in nineteenth-century Europe. Tracing the contribution of Italians to the struggles for Greek independence from the war of 1820 - 21 to the war between Greece and Turkey in 1897, this article shows how Italian support for the philhellenist cause illustrates the internationalist context of Risorgimento nationalism. After Unification the philhellenist cause offered the opportunity to continue the tradition of volunteers enlisting to fight against tyranny and oppression abroad. This culminated in the volunteer expedition to fight with the Greeks against the Turks in 1897 led by Ricciotti Garibaldi - son of the hero of Italian Unification. But that expedition also marked the end of the nineteenth-century international volunteer movement. In Italy many socialists and nationalists were opposed to it, in part because it was seen as a diversion from political struggles that needed to be fought at home and in part because the project of the nation in arms was less and less realistic in the context of late nineteenth-century geopolitics. But at its height, the international volunteer movement - to which Italy made a major contribution - was an act of political idealism that drew on appeals to the unity of Greco-Latin civilization.
UNQUOTE

QUOTE
In the summer of 1821, various young men from all Europe began to gather in the French port of Marseilles to book a passage to Greece and join the revolution.[83] The French philhellene Jean-François-Maxime Raybaud wrote when he heard of the revolution in March 1821, "I learnt with a thrill that Greece was shaking off her chains" and in July 1821 boarded a ship going to Greece.[83] Between the summer of 1821 and end of 1822, when the French started to inspect ships leaving Marseilles for philhellenes, some 360 volunteers travelled to Greece.[84] From the United States came the doctor Samuel Gridley Howe and the soldier George Jarvis to fight with the Greeks.[85] The largest contingents came from the German states, France and the Italian states.[84] In Nafplio, a monument to honor the philhellenes who died fighting in the war listed 274 names, of which 100 are from Germany, forty each from France and Italy, and the rest from Britain, Spain, Hungary, Sweden, Portugal and Denmark.[86]
UNQUOTE

Note that I am Orthodox, not Catholic, which means that my Italian grandfather switched allegiance to the Greek Orthodox Church after settling in Greece, probably near Patras. There is a history of this happening with many Italians (Venetians, Genoans and others) who chose to settle in Greece.

If it wasn't for my Italian grandfather, I'd be presumably 99.2% Balkan-Greece.

According to 23andme, I have 410 "Balkan" relatives (who are 99% Greek or Western Euros/US citizens with one Greek parent) and 335 Italian relatives still living today. These two groups constitute the two biggest groups of my relatives.

I am especially proud I have 0% Slav in my DNA, as I have been listening to the BS written by Fallmerayer (or w/e this is spelt) since I was a kid and I am now 42, propagated by the freaking Greek Communists who tried to convince us (I think they call this brain-washing) that WE MUST BE SLAVS because the Greeks died out 2000 tears ago. So much BS. I am glad there's 23andme.

I hope you found this post interesting. Please ask away and I will reply.

All the best.[/QU









Surprise findings! You have no Turkish genes. Usually Greeks have from 5 to 15% Caucasian which is Turkish

Golfino does not exist as a surname in italy anymore but its origin was Genovese from circa 1150.

I looked at Golfini ( change to i as in many ) and there are only a handful in north italy

Leo Achaicus
10-05-18, 21:20
I am not quite sure what to make of 5th Cousins? Is this legit or just genetic noise?

"You and X share 3rd-great-grandparents. You could also be from different generations (removed cousins) or share only one ancestor (half cousins)."

There's more Italian surnames: Terrano, Teani, Fontana, Scalfarotto, Aloisio, Sirchia and the Grasso-Cernaro-Geraci family with joint ancestry from San Fratello in Sicily and Reggio Calabria.

I have excluded anyone who did not report their ancestry and anyone who reported 1 or more Greek ancestors.

I think I am stopping at "5th Cousin".

Leo Achaicus
10-05-18, 21:39
Golfino does not exist as a surname in italy anymore but its origin was Genovese from circa 1150.

I looked at Golfini ( change to i as in many ) and there are only a handful in north italy

Sile, many thanks for contributing. I had a look at the website you quoted me. Indeed it is uncanny, but all four 4th Cousin surnames appear to be most common in S Italy and Sicily, i.e. ancient Magna Graecia.

I asked a friend who is a linguist, and he suggested that my great-great-great-grandfather's surname was originally GIOLFINOin Italian which became "Golfino" in Greek b/c the Greek pronunciation dropped the "i" after the "G". The Giolfino family AFAIK came from Verona in N. Italy.

Other Italian surnames existing in Patras (my hometown) are not missing any vowels, e.g. "Fontana".

I also found I am related with the Grassa family from San Fratello in Sicily & Reggio Calabria, so one more point for you. Thank you very much, I am gonna send this page to my brother for reading.

Leo Achaicus
10-05-18, 22:37
I didn't know, but apparently Al Pacino comes from San Fratello in Sicily. So apparently I am related to a family (Grassa) that comes from the same village with Al Pacino. Now THAT is cool. It made me smile.

So, using the website you gave me, I traced the ancestry of my "5th Cousin" surnames:

Cornaro: Lombardia (1st), Sicily (2nd).
Terrano: Sicily, Campania.
Fontana: Lombardia, Emilia-Romagna.
Scalfarotto: Lombardia, Puglia.
Aloisio: Sicilia, Calabria
Sirchia: Sicilia, Lazio.
Grasso: Sicilia, Calabria
Geraci: Sicilia, Lombardia.

"4th Cousins":

Cerra: Calabria (1st), Campania (2nd).
Pierro: Campania, Puglia.
Giordano: Campania, Sicilia.
Fabiano: Calabria, Lombardia.

You are right, Calabria and Sicilia mostly.

This is very exciting and cool.

Leo Achaicus
11-05-18, 14:03
I made a couple of maps pinpointing my ancestry:

https://i.imgur.com/0b7rz1E.jpg


https://i.imgur.com/AaxkOv6.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/Kq6davN.jpg