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View Full Version : Ancient parallel lineages within North America



Angela
06-06-18, 22:37
See:


[*=left]C. L. Scheib1 (http://science.sciencemag.org/content/360/6392/1024#aff-1),2 (http://science.sciencemag.org/content/360/6392/1024#aff-2),* (http://science.sciencemag.org/content/360/6392/1024#corresp-1),
[*=left]Hongjie Li3 (http://science.sciencemag.org/content/360/6392/1024#aff-3),
[*=left]Tariq Desai4 (http://science.sciencemag.org/content/360/6392/1024#aff-4),
[*=left]Vivian Link5 (http://science.sciencemag.org/content/360/6392/1024#aff-5),
[*=left]Christopher Kendall6 (http://science.sciencemag.org/content/360/6392/1024#aff-6),
[*=left]Genevieve Dewar6 (http://science.sciencemag.org/content/360/6392/1024#aff-6), et al



"Ancient human parallel lineages within North America contributed to a coastal expansion"


http://science.sciencemag.org/content/360/6392/1024

"Scheib et al. sequenced ancient genomes from the Channel Islands of California, USA, and Ontario, Canada. The ancient Ontario population was similar to other ancient North Americans, as well as to modern Algonquian-speaking Native Americans. In contrast, the California individuals were more like groups that now live in Mexico and South America. It appears that a genetic split and population isolation likely occurred during the Ice Age, but the peoples remixed at a later date."

"Little is known regarding the first people to enter the Americas and their genetic legacy. Genomic analysis of the oldest human remains from the Americas showed a direct relationship between a Clovis-related ancestral population and all modern Central and South Americans as well as a deep split separating them from North Americans in Canada. We present 91 ancient human genomes from California and Southwestern Ontario and demonstrate the existence of two distinct ancestries in North America, which possibly split south of the ice sheets. A contribution from both of these ancestral populations is found in all modern Central and South Americans. The proportions of these two ancestries in ancient and modern populations are consistent with a coastal dispersal and multiple admixture events."

Alyan
07-06-18, 03:39
Now if only we could get DNA from the Olmecs and their predecessors.

I1a3_Young
11-06-18, 17:14
A good and needed study it appears. The mtDNA and Y-DNA work is nice. The mt groups are all A,B,C,D with a single X2. They proposed a change to a B tree.

Y haplo all Q, with a colonist sample thrown in that was a Nordic branch of I1 with a U4 mt haplo. The colonist sample date was during the colonial american time period in Pennsylvania.

Angela
11-06-18, 17:21
A good and needed study it appears. The mtDNA and Y-DNA work is nice. The mt groups are all A,B,C,D with a single X2. They proposed a change to a B tree.

Y haplo all Q, with a colonist sample thrown in that was a Nordic branch of I1 with a U4 mt haplo. The colonist sample date was during the colonial american time period in Pennsylvania.

Remember all the insistence that the X2 had to come from Europe? :)

bicicleur
11-06-18, 18:59
Remember all the insistence that the X2 had to come from Europe? :)

who did so?
there is a clear split, it was already obvious before :

This relative absence of haplogroup X2 in Asia is one of the major factors used to support the Solutrean hypothesis. However, the New World haplogroup X2a is as different from any of the Old World X2b, X2c, X2d, X2e, and X2f lineages as they are from each other, indicating an early origin "likely at the very beginning of their expansion and spread from the Near East".[17]

I'd say X2 split somewhere in Siberia prior to the migration to America.