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Angela
12-04-19, 16:20
Given current conditions the answer is apparently yes.

The fact that astronaut Scott Kelly is an identical twin helped scientists in their analysis, but other changes were obvious, and some did not reverse completely with time.

"Subtle changesOne genetic change that did largely persist six months after Scott returned to Earth affected his chromosomes. Parts of them inverted, or flipped end-to-end. That leads to DNA damage and might be linked to the high amounts of radiation he experienced while in space.
Many of the caps at the ends of Scott’s chromosomes, called telomeres, also mysteriously lengthened during spaceflight, says Bailey. That’s the opposite of what she had expected, because telomeres shorten with age, and spaceflight stresses the body in much the same way as ageing does. Scott’s telomeres shortened within 48 hours of his return to Earth and are mostly back to their pre-flight lengths, although he does have more short telomeres now than before the flight. That could increase his risk of cardiovascular disease or certain types of cancer, Bailey says."


https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01149-y?utm_source=twt_nnc&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=naturenews&utm_medium=social&utm_content=organic&utm_source=twitter&utm_campaign=NatureNews_&sf210906587=1

bigsnake49
16-04-19, 03:17
Given current conditions the answer is apparently yes.

The fact that astronaut Scott Kelly is an identical twin helped scientists in their analysis, but other changes were obvious, and some did not reverse completely with time.

"Subtle changes

One genetic change that did largely persist six months after Scott returned to Earth affected his chromosomes. Parts of them inverted, or flipped end-to-end. That leads to DNA damage and might be linked to the high amounts of radiation he experienced while in space.
Many of the caps at the ends of Scott’s chromosomes, called telomeres, also mysteriously lengthened during spaceflight, says Bailey. That’s the opposite of what she had expected, because telomeres shorten with age, and spaceflight stresses the body in much the same way as ageing does. Scott’s telomeres shortened within 48 hours of his return to Earth and are mostly back to their pre-flight lengths, although he does have more short telomeres now than before the flight. That could increase his risk of cardiovascular disease or certain types of cancer, Bailey says."


https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01149-y?utm_source=twt_nnc&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=naturenews&utm_medium=social&utm_content=organic&utm_source=twitter&utm_campaign=NatureNews_&sf210906587=1

They need better shielding that eliminates or reduces gamma rays from reaching the astronauts.

judithjohnson
12-06-19, 17:58
I think space travel will change any person.

dnsn107
29-07-19, 02:01
I think it will give a unified sense of purpose that will reduce conflict on the whole.

Wanderer
18-08-19, 16:32
Yes. Muscle and bone mass degeneration

Tutkun Arnaut
21-11-19, 21:44
i think living organisms are custom made for this earth! near earth space flights are ok, i do not believe interstellar travelling is posible

Sofie Tveit
29-11-19, 08:51
Survival of the fittest.

We have developed or evolved into an organism(!) that can completely adapt to the earth's environment through years.

All of a sudden when you start a space expedition, it is impossible to adapt to the space-environment and the light exposure. I completely understand there are no other way, making small single steps at a time may prove to be good.

TommyJ
23-12-20, 10:26
I think the possibility of space travel will change the perception of the world in the future.
And space travel itself will not only temporarily affect human DNA, but, over time, will give us a new round of evolution. Since a person has always adapted to changes in the environment. Each new generation will be more and more adapted to space travel exactly from the moment when the first really long flight will be carried out. And yes, as long as we have to adapt to space through technical solutions. But work in this direction never stopped.

KayBur
04-01-21, 16:56
I think the possibility of space travel will change the perception of the world in the future.
And space travel itself will not only temporarily affect human DNA, but, over time, will give us a new round of evolution. Since a person has always adapted to changes in the environment. Each new generation will be more and more adapted to space travel exactly from the moment when the first really long flight will be carried out. And yes, as long as we have to adapt to space through technical solutions. But work in this direction never stopped.


Well, first of all, before adapting to space travel, we need to adapt to keeping our home planet clean. We look at distant stars, but do not see how we have dirtied the Earth. Every day, thousands of animals, birds, fish suffer from pollution, emissions, garbage accumulations.

TommyJ
11-01-21, 11:29
Well, first of all, before adapting to space travel, we need to adapt to keeping our home planet clean. We look at distant stars, but do not see how we have dirtied the Earth. Every day, thousands of animals, birds, fish suffer from pollution, emissions, garbage accumulations.

On the one hand, I agree with you. On the other hand, when it comes to such a large number of people with a lot of initiatives and problems to be solved, it may still not be worth doing something first. Rather, you need to entrust everyone to do what they are good at and push it to the limit. If all the efforts of mankind would be aimed at the development of one specific area, it is unlikely that we would have something other than military equipment at the moment)
There are enough people on the planet to develop everything at once. Perhaps we need a little more initiative people in different areas