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Tomenable
23-04-19, 12:07
I0588 Tanzania Zanzibar, sample published by Pontus Skoglund and dated to 800 AD:

https://i.imgur.com/2qHywnc.png

Eurogenes K15 results of this sample:

27834 SNPs used in this evaluation

Admix Results (sorted):

# Population Percent
1 Atlantic 26.89
2 West_Med 26.26
3 North_Sea 24.7
4 East_Med 6.37
5 Baltic 5.24
6 West_Asian 3
7 Red_Sea 2.41
8 Sub-Saharan 2.4
9 Eastern_Euro 1.48
10 Siberian 1.25

Single Population Sharing:

# Population (source) Distance
1 Spanish_Galicia 6.55
2 Portuguese 7.09
3 Spanish_Cantabria 7.34
4 Spanish_Cataluna 7.72
5 Spanish_Castilla_Y_Leon 7.99
6 Spanish_Extremadura 8.15
7 Spanish_Murcia 8.9
8 Spanish_Castilla_La_Mancha 9.69
9 Southwest_French 10.05
10 Spanish_Aragon 10.18
11 Spanish_Valencia 10.25
12 Spanish_Andalucia 10.47
13 French 11.81
14 North_Italian 12.6
15 South_Dutch 16.64
16 French_Basque 17.96
17 West_German 18.29
18 Southwest_English 18.53
19 Tuscan 18.61
20 Southeast_English 20.41

Mixed Mode Population Sharing:

# Primary Population (source) Secondary Population (source) Distance
1 55.1% Orcadian + 44.9% Sardinian @ 4.56
2 60.8% Southwest_English + 39.2% Sardinian @ 5.11
3 55.2% West_Scottish + 44.8% Sardinian @ 5.35
4 55.9% Irish + 44.1% Sardinian @ 5.41
5 58.3% Southeast_English + 41.7% Sardinian @ 5.48
6 59.6% Spanish_Galicia + 40.4% Spanish_Cantabria @ 5.8
7 85.5% Spanish_Galicia + 14.5% French_Basque @ 5.89
8 92% Spanish_Galicia + 8% Sardinian @ 6.11
9 55% North_Dutch + 45% Sardinian @ 6.12
10 73.1% French + 26.9% Sardinian @ 6.18
11 79.4% Spanish_Galicia + 20.6% Spanish_Aragon @ 6.21
12 79.3% Spanish_Galicia + 20.7% Southwest_French @ 6.22
13 83.2% Spanish_Galicia + 16.8% Spanish_Castilla_La_Mancha @ 6.38
14 80.4% Spanish_Galicia + 19.6% Spanish_Cataluna @ 6.47
15 88.9% Spanish_Galicia + 11.1% Spanish_Andalucia @ 6.47
16 88.9% Spanish_Galicia + 11.1% Spanish_Valencia @ 6.48
17 54.5% Portuguese + 45.5% Spanish_Cantabria @ 6.49
18 99.4% Spanish_Galicia + 0.6% Yoruban @ 6.51
19 99.4% Spanish_Galicia + 0.6% Mandenka @ 6.52
20 88% Spanish_Galicia + 12% Spanish_Castilla_Y_Leon @ 6.52

Similarity map:

https://i.imgur.com/9ry2D0G.png

Europeans in Zanzibar - eastern coast of Africa - as early as 800 CE ???

This sample is also in Global25.

Tomenable
23-04-19, 14:43
Is it possible that they made a mistake in dating and this is a 16th century sample, not 800 AD?

berun
23-04-19, 21:38
the most simple explanation, bad labeling. Taking into account the amount of errors in the excel files of these labs with large grants... by people that is not getting any dollar by doing such job. If you pay peanuts then you are working with monkeys.

And even now Reich's lab is asking for free help and advice necessary by no hiring competitive people! it's inmoral after the millionary grants that they are getting.

Megalophias
23-04-19, 22:22
It doesn't have a radiocarbon date listed, so yeah it could be a later burial that ended up in early layers AFAICT.

Angela
24-04-19, 00:47
Maybe a Portuguese there in the 15th century.
https://www.zanzibarhistory.org/zanzibar_christians.htm

Tomenable
24-04-19, 11:30
But the burial was dated to 800 CE not 15th century. A mistake?

Gnarl
24-04-19, 13:55
Trade in Zanzibar was increasing rapidly in the 8th century. It became a common stop for Persian, Indian and Arab traders. Arabs also bought considerable numbers of European slaves who could have been brought along on trips. Although the dating is a bit too early for the heavy slave raids on western Europe. Could also be a convert, or on an outside chance a descendant of the Vandals. more likly of the Visigoths though. That timeline works quite well. Zanzibar is not really beyond Arab voyages of the time and anyone who could plausibly get onto an Arab ship could end up there.

Someone of European descent sounds rare, but not impossible.

Angela
24-04-19, 14:41
But the burial was dated to 800 CE not 15th century. A mistake?

Possibly, since it's not radio carbon dated, but as Gnarl pointed out, a stray Portuguese could have wound up there in 800 AD.

italouruguayan
25-04-19, 01:44
Al Andalus had great travelers, such as Al Ghazal and Ibn Arabi ... perhaps it is some unknown traveler , a Hispano-Roman converted to Islam...

Angela
25-04-19, 02:02
Al Andalus had great travelers, such as Al Ghazal and Ibn Arabi ... perhaps it is some unknown traveler , a Hispano-Roman converted to Islam...

I was thinking of a perhaps unknown Ibn Battuta, one from Iberia. He had even Marco Polo beat, I think. :)

https://www.history.com/news/why-arab-scholar-ibn-battuta-is-the-greatest-explorer-of-all-time

Tomenable
19-08-19, 05:40
Ygorcs also started a thread about it: https://www.eupedia.com/forum/threads/38968-Doubts-about-the-Tanzania_Zanzibar_First-Millennium-aDNA-sample?p=582921&viewfull=1#post582921

Duarte
29-04-20, 14:51
If the dating of this sample is correct, this man was a European slave sent to the Africa by the Moors, in the Al-Andalus period in Iberian Peninsula. See this graft extracted from Wikipedia in English:

Christian slavery in Muslim Spain

During the Al-Andalus (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al-Andalus) (also known as Muslim Spain or Islamic Iberia), the Moors (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moors) controlled much of the peninsula. They imported white Christian slaves from the 8th century until the Reconquista (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reconquista) in the late 15th century. The slaves were exported from the Christian section of Spain, as well as Eastern Europe, sparking significant reaction from many in Christian Spain and many Christians still living in Muslim Spain. Soon after, Muslims were successful, taking 30,000 Christian captives from Spain. In the eighth century slavery lasted longer due to "frequent cross-border skirmishes, interspersed between periods of major campaigns". By the tenth century, in the eastern Mediterranean Byzantine, Christians were captured by Muslims. Many of the raids designed by Muslims were created for a fast capture of prisoners. Therefore, Muslims restricted the control in order to keep captives from fleeing. The Iberian peninsula served as a base for further exports of slaves into other Muslim regions in Northern Africa.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_slavery

Maciamo
29-04-20, 16:46
Al Andalus had great travelers, such as Al Ghazal and Ibn Arabi ... perhaps it is some unknown traveler , a Hispano-Roman converted to Islam...

I also think that it is the most likely explanation. Southern Iberia was part of the Muslim World at that time and it would not be surprising to find travellers and traders going all the way to the Arabian peninsula and even along the coast of East Africa.

Duarte
29-04-20, 17:10
I also think that it is the most likely explanation. Southern Iberia was part of the Muslim World at that time and it would not be surprising to find travellers and traders going all the way to the Arabian peninsula and even along the coast of East Africa.

Yes, I agree with you @maciamo.
The @italouruguayan’s hypothesis is quite plausible. The view presented by Wikipedia tends to demonize the Arab occupation of the Iberian Peninsula when we all know that the Al-Andalusians were, indeed, technically and culturally very advanced.

torzio
29-04-20, 18:18
If the dating of this sample is correct, this man was a European slave sent to the Africa by the Moors, in the Al-Andalus period in Iberian Peninsula. See this graft extracted from Wikipedia in English:

Christian slavery in Muslim Spain

During the Al-Andalus (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al-Andalus) (also known as Muslim Spain or Islamic Iberia), the Moors (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moors) controlled much of the peninsula. They imported white Christian slaves from the 8th century until the Reconquista (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reconquista) in the late 15th century. The slaves were exported from the Christian section of Spain, as well as Eastern Europe, sparking significant reaction from many in Christian Spain and many Christians still living in Muslim Spain. Soon after, Muslims were successful, taking 30,000 Christian captives from Spain. In the eighth century slavery lasted longer due to "frequent cross-border skirmishes, interspersed between periods of major campaigns". By the tenth century, in the eastern Mediterranean Byzantine, Christians were captured by Muslims. Many of the raids designed by Muslims were created for a fast capture of prisoners. Therefore, Muslims restricted the control in order to keep captives from fleeing. The Iberian peninsula served as a base for further exports of slaves into other Muslim regions in Northern Africa.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_slavery



white slavery was still around in the 1800 century

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbary_pirates

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angelo_Emo was bombarding their ( barbary pirates ) bases in north africa as late as 1787

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venetian_bombardments_of_the_Beylik_of_Tunis_(1784 %E2%80%931788)

There was also French and English attacks on these pirates

Carlos
29-04-20, 19:50
2.6
TZA_Zanzibar_Euro_outlier





I have obtained this sample in G25 as you have seen in my ON-AIR thread.


I don't know if this man had had time to be Andalusí. This man went to look for a recipe, some plants to that place so far away and never returned.

(They can tell their countries to solve the Andalusí-Andalusian terms at once in the translations, it is that it is not the same and it causes a lot of pain to my soul the use of Andalusian for the Muslim era in Spain)

Duarte
29-04-20, 20:03
2.6
TZA_Zanzibar_Euro_outlier




I have obtained this sample in G25 as you have seen in my ON-AIR thread.


I don't know if this man had had time to be Andalusí. This man went to look for a recipe, some plants to that place so far away and never returned.

(They can tell their countries to solve the Andalusí-Andalusian terms at once in the translations, it is that it is not the same and it causes a lot of pain to my soul the use of Andalusian for the Muslim era in Spain)

Hello Carlos.
In fact, he died a long way from home, and probably after leaving his beloved land, he never returned.
Cheers dear friend.

Carlos
29-04-20, 21:05
Hello Carlos.
In fact, he died a long way from home, and probably after leaving his beloved land, he never returned.
Cheers dear friend.

He made a very bad trip, he practically arrived in the bones, a terrible anemia, he could not overcome it. I wonder if they got the plants they were looking for anyway and if they came up with the recipe.