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Jovialis
27-10-19, 19:50
Dropping in for a minute, I’m on vacation currently in London, and I must say it is a really beautiful city. I loved it from the minute we got here. I particularly want to mention how much I adore British cuisine, specifically nose to tail. Yes, it fantastic! Last night I ate deviled kidneys, bone marrow on parsley salad, snails and barely, and lamb broth. Today I had scotch eggs, and various meat pies for lunch. I’m looking forward to dinner tonight.

I absolutely love and appreciate British food!

Salento
27-10-19, 20:35
If you enjoy this kind of cuisine, try the Steak and Kidney Pie.

Beef Wellington for me :)

... SoHo, and Covent Garden for shopping.

... Kew Garden (exotic plants from everywhere) ...

Jovialis
27-10-19, 21:05
Thus far I've seen St. Paul's Cathedral, which I was really into, because I am a fan of Lord Nelson, and Lord Wellington. The Parliament building, which was fascinating; our tour guide was very good. The British Museum, which had the Rosetta Stone, and really great Greek, Roman, and Etruscan pieces. They also had great Neolithic artifacts, as well as Bell Beaker remains. The Globe theater, and Buckingham Palace from the outside. We went around Piccadilly Circus, to different shops. Tomorrow, we are seeing more stuff too.

Salento
27-10-19, 21:22
I spent about one year in London. I still have a National Insurance Number Card, and a huge driver’s license made of paper :cool-v:

Jovialis
27-10-19, 21:23
Nice! I could see myself living here, if I could.

Salento
27-10-19, 23:42
imho Competitive people won’t like working for too long in the UK.

most people that love the London way and system of doing things (Social prog. help and stuff), will never make it in New York :)

Jovialis
28-10-19, 19:14
Today we saw Westminster Abby, and the Tower of London. It was marvelous!

Also, people should really control their children, I saw some toddler walking all over memorial of the unknown solider.

Jovialis
29-10-19, 00:09
https://i.imgur.com/dUzN37A.png

Cool, perfect timing for this revelation :laughing:

Salento
29-10-19, 23:15
In England they had Muffins, but NO English Muffins (at my time)

and the Breakfast:

Eggs, soft Bacon, huge thick slice of tomato :petrified: beans :startled: strange black pudding, ...

Fish & Chips with vinegar every Friday afternoon for me ...

Maciamo
30-10-19, 09:58
I love London and I have generally had very positive experiences with British food all over Britain. France may be renowned for its fine cuisine, but in my experience quality in cheaper restaurants is often disappointing. To eat well in France one has to pay at least 30€ for a meal (without drinks), unless one eats bread or pastries (also excellent). That's not the case in Britain, where the quality tends to be more consistent. But Britain also has more nationwide food chains. As soon as a restaurant works well, the business-minded Brits expand it into a chain, which the French almost never do (the exception being the bakery chain Paul, now found in 30 countries around the world).

Carlos
30-10-19, 11:12
I don't know anything about British cuisine. I think they eat eggs with bacon and make meat pies. For the rest in Spain it does not have very good press or there is not a very clear image of its gastronomy or its specialties, in general there is not much interest and for something it should be.

Angela
30-10-19, 18:26
I don't know anything about British cuisine. I think they eat eggs with bacon and make meat pies. For the rest in Spain it does not have very good press or there is not a very clear image of its gastronomy or its specialties, in general there is not much interest and for something it should be.

If you eat "foreign", as in Indian, Chinese, Italian, etc. I think it can be good, so long as you keep away from the chains. I tried Zizzi when I was last there. It's like Olive Garden if it was 50% worse.

I mean, look at this monstrosity:
https://i.imgur.com/LM6TGi4.png[
English food itself I don't like, nor do food critics rate it very highly. I can't stand pub food, for instance, as the pastry at the ones I've tried was stodgy and tough. Nor do I like kidneys. I'm not a fan of the vaunted "full English" breakfast, either. Black pudding??? Also, the worst baked beans I've ever eaten in my life. So long as you stick to bacon eggs and toast it's O.K.

I rent out my condo to a lot of British people over the summer. How they can stand Florida in July and August I don't know, but I'm happy to have them. They're always thrilled by the food, they tell me, by which they mean places like Applebee's and Chico's etc!

It's gotten better over the years, though. When I was in England for my honeymoon, I stuck it out a week and then started crying over dinner one night, so we went back to France to finish up our trip.

Jovialis
30-10-19, 18:48
I love London and I have generally had very positive experiences with British food all over Britain. France may be renowned for its fine cuisine, but in my experience quality in cheaper restaurants is often disappointing. To eat well in France one has to pay at least 30€ for a meal (without drinks), unless one eats bread or pastries (also excellent). That's not the case in Britain, where the quality tends to be more consistent. But Britain also has more nationwide food chains. As soon as a restaurant works well, the business-minded Brits expand it into a chain, which the French almost never do (the exception being the bakery chain Paul, now found in 30 countries around the world).

My favorite restaurant that we ate at in London, was Lyle's. It is actually on the San Pellegrino top 10 restaurants of the world; every course was delicious. But the Blackfriars had excellent fish and chips, and meat pie.

Paris is next on our list in the coming months.

Maciamo
30-10-19, 19:10
My favorite restaurant that we ate at in London, was Lyle's. It is actually on the San Pellegrino top 10 restaurants of the world; every course was delicious. But the Blackfriars had excellent fish and chips, and meat pie.

Good to know. I have bookmarked them for the next time I am in London.

Maciamo
30-10-19, 19:15
It's gotten better over the years, though. When I was in England for my honeymoon, I stuck it out a week and then started crying over dinner one night, so we went back to France to finish up our trip.

British cuisine has made tremendous progress in a few decades. It used to be disgusting and that's why the stereotype still clings, but nowadays there are terrific British restaurants.

Salento
30-10-19, 20:23
it’s also perception.

The extensive use of offals in their cuisine are repugnant to many.

They look at the Menu, they grossed out, and they won’t try those dishes, but it's possible that if they didn t know the ingredients, they would have liked it.

Tutkun Arnaut
30-10-19, 20:25
Its not only the chefs who made the food taste good, its also the ingridients! Let say following the same procedures to make cheese, Italian cheese is a lot better than american cheese! American Italians brought cows from Sicily to improve the cheese made in USA, result was it was not the cow, but the food cow is eating. American made cheese was not as good as Italian one. My point is how good the ingredients produced in England are, to make the food good. I never been in England but in Usa there are great regional differences related to food!

Angela
30-10-19, 20:30
it’s also perception.

The extensive use of offals in their cuisine are reprehensible to many.

They look at the Menu, they grossed out, and they won’t try those dishes, but it's possible that if they didn t know the ingredients, they would have liked it.






Extensive use of offal

It's possible. I don't usually like any of it: kidney, liver, intestines, you name it, so I feel their pain.:) The problem for me is that the pastry it's encased in is usually tough and hard as a rock, and the vegetables are water logged and soggy. I mean, who would invent mashed peas??? They're one of my least favorite vegetables to start with, and they're not improved by mashing and underseasoning.

The French feature a lot of offal too, and you can find it in Italian restaurants too, but there's also other great food on the menu.

As I said, the food scene has improved a lot in London, if not in the provinces, but "English" food itself is just not my cup of tea. :)

I will definitely try the restaurant Jovialis recommended next time I'm there, though.

Jovialis
30-10-19, 20:32
Its not only the chefs who made the food taste good, its also the ingridients! Let say following the same procedures to make cheese, Italian cheese is a lot better than american cheese! American Italians brought cows from Sicily to improve the cheese made in USA, result was it was not the cow, but the food cow is eating. American made cheese was not as good as Italian one. My point is how good the ingredients produced in England are, to make the food good. I never been in England but in Usa there are great regional differences related to food!

They say New York/New Jersey pizza is the best in the United States (not in the world), mainly because of the water here.

Angela
30-10-19, 20:34
They say New York/New Jersey pizza is the best in the United States (not in the world), mainly because of the water here.

I definitely think that's possible.

N.Y.C. has great tasting as well as very clean water. Imagine trying to cook in New Orleans. No wonder they use so many spices.

Tutkun Arnaut
30-10-19, 20:44
They say New York/New Jersey pizza is the best in the United States (not in the world), mainly because of the water here.

True! Because all ingredients are imported from Italy! Canned sauce from Italy, cheese from Italy, flower from Italy and water is imported from Canada

Salento
30-10-19, 21:33
True! Because all ingredients are imported from Italy! Canned sauce from Italy, cheese from Italy, flower from Italy and water is imported from Canada


Are you saying that the city water in New York comes from Canada?

Tutkun Arnaut
30-10-19, 22:45
Are you saying that the city water in New York comes from Canada?
some of it! The cities reservuars are close to Canada

TardisBlue
31-10-19, 00:10
If you eat "foreign", as in Indian, Chinese, Italian, etc. I think it can be good, so long as you keep away from the chains. I tried Zizzi when I was last there. It's like Olive Garden if it was 50% worse.

I don't know Olive Garden but Zizzi is an abomination. I ate there once in London - we were really hungry after a 3 hour walk around the city and wanted Italian food. Unfortunately, the small authentic-like restaurant we were aiming for was full, so we settled for Zizzi. Big mistake… the pizza dough was undercooked, all floppy and soaked by the "tomato sauce" (which tasted almost like ketchup), and when you lifted the edge of it, all the topping would slide down.

As for British food, I don't know much about it, but I love some of their desserts - crumbles, Eaton mess… and the Scottish shortbreads are to die for. I love cheesecakes too, but apparently it's Greek.

Angela
31-10-19, 00:24
The water doesn't come from anywhere near Canada, which is about 300 miles away. It comes from the Catskills and the Delaware catchment area, which are maybe an hour or an hour and a half north and northwest of the city. It's a beautiful part of the country.
https://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/water_pdf/nycsystem.pdf
http://i1.nyt.com/images/2016/03/22/nyregion/00water-slide-TQ8J/00water-slide-TQ8J-tmagArticle-v4.jpg

It's true that the best Italian restaurants and even pizzerias import canned tomatoes, romano and parmigiano cheese (hard cheeses), olive oil, etc. from Italy. However, some neighborhood pizzerias don't. Mozzarella, which spoils very quickly, is almost always locally sourced.

One of the reasons Italian American cooking is different from Italian cooking is precisely because a lot of ingredients weren't frequently available in the early years. I think I remember that when we first came we couldn't get prosciutto, for example.

Angela
31-10-19, 00:50
I don't know Olive Garden but Zizzi is an abomination. I ate there once in London - we were really hungry after a 3 hour walk around the city and wanted Italian food. Unfortunately, the small authentic-like restaurant we were aiming for was full, so we settled for Zizzi. Big mistake… the pizza dough was undercooked, all floppy and soaked by the "tomato sauce" (which tasted almost like ketchup), and when you lifted the edge of it, all the topping would slide down.

As for British food, I don't know much about it, but I love some of their desserts - crumbles, Eaton mess… and the Scottish shortbreads are to die for. I love cheesecakes too, but apparently it's Greek.

Olive Garden is terrible, but Zizzi is infinitely worse. Like I said, my British renters think our chains like Applebee's are great so that tells me all I need to know. :)

Did you see that plate of pasta I posted? It looks like an abomination we have here called Chef Boyardee; it's canned pasta. Some poor children I knew actually liked it. :( It's soupy, the pasta is flaccid and soft, and the stuffing tastes the way I imagine dog food tastes. YUCK!

https://fortunedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2019/03/chef-boyardee.jpg

Yes, I like British baked goods; I'm a devotee of the tv show "The Great British Bake Off". :) The best desserts are still, however, imo, the French and German ones. The Italians are rubbish at desserts in comparison so far as I'm concerned. The parents of one of my close friends came from Bavaria after the war, and her mother and grandmother taught her how to bake. Wonderful, wonderful recipes, and great technique. I learned a lot from her, but I'm not a baker. It's very, very, precise, and you need lots and lots of practice, as you do for making your own pasta, and I don't like desserts enough to put in all that time. I save the calories for pasta. :)

Love cheesecake too. New York cheesecake is famous and very good, but I still have a place in my heart for Sicilian cheesecake made with ricotta, which I infinitely prefer to American cream cheese. The Sicilians and the Neapolitans are the only Italians with a feel for sweets.

http://foodtasia.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/classic-ny-cheesecake-7.jpg

My favorite sweet comes from Napoli: sfogliatelle

https://amalfinotizie.it/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/sfogliatella-napoletana.jpg

The only sweet dessert that I really love from my own area is sweet rice torta.
https://images.food52.com/4_Q5yEAzVEWJD4xXAe4mZM07X8E=/2fd716be-3939-4cfd-8401-265bf6acfb9a--torta-alla-carrarina-food52-IMG_8835.jpg

Duarte
31-10-19, 01:45
I know London very well. It is a beautiful city. I am not going to talk much because Jovialis is there now and is describing places I've been through that are, in fact, very interesting. It's delightful to see someone else's impression visiting a place you've been to. I agree with everything Jovialis has said so far except for the food. I stayed hosted near Euston Square Station and the best place I ate was at a family Italian restaurant, not so far from the hotel. I discovered a snack bar that served Brazilian food and even had drinks made in Brazil. Talking to the owners, I realized from the accent that they were Portuguese. I asked where they were from and they said they were from the Azores. But the food was good and really Brazilian. Liked it. But most of the time when I was hungry, I solved my problem at Pizza Hut or McDonalds. At night it was always a problem. Everything closes from 10:00 PM. Only a few pubs are open. In Brazil, at 10:00 PM the nightlife is just beginning, at least in Belo Horizonte, Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo. Maybe now that Jovialis is there, I can have better references of restaurants and dishes and can, on another occasion, better enjoy the local cuisine.

Salento
31-10-19, 01:55
I was a blood donor since forever.

But ‘cause of British beef and cows:

Last time I went to donate blood, I was told that I can't give it anymore ‘cause of Mad cow disease.
It's been years now, and they still don’t want it.

I don't know if it’s still the case, but anyone who spent a certain period of time in the UK (about 1 year in my case) can’t donate blood in the United States anymore.

... so much for British food, cuisine, and ... grrrr!


@Duarte Nobody knows London better than me,

I went to England to better my English, but I got Really Good at Snooker instead (a billiard game), going from pub to pub ...to pub .. to pub ... LOL

I spent so much time in the pubs, that I got very fluent in Cockney :)

Duarte
31-10-19, 02:55
I was a blood donor since forever.

But ‘cause of British beef and cows:

Last time I went to donate blood, I was told that I can't give it anymore ‘cause of Mad cow disease.
It's been years now, and they still don’t want it.

I don't know if it’s still the case, but anyone who spent a certain period of time in the UK (about 1 year in my case) can’t donate blood in the United States anymore.

... so much for British food, cuisine, and ... grrrr!


@Duarte Nobody knows London better than me,

I went to England to better my English, but I got Really Good at Snooker instead (a billiard game), going from pub to pub ...to pub .. to pub ... LOL

I spent so much time in the pubs, that I got very fluent in Cockney :)

LOL I believe that by walking from pub to pub, you were able to learn local English. You have learned to speak as the singer Adele. Cool. LOL. :grin:

Salento
31-10-19, 03:16
LOL I believe that by walking from pub to pub, you were able to learn local English. You have learned to speak as the singer Adele. Cool. LOL. :grin:

I don’t remember any Adele (could be), but in so many of her songs, she just won’t stop complaining about me :grin: LOL

I can say with confidence that Adele loves Brits Cuisine, and the French, the Italian, ... :)

Duarte
31-10-19, 03:30
I don’t remember any Adele (could be), but in so many of her songs, she just won’t stop complaining about me :grin: LOL

Hummm. :thinking: Indeed, I suspected you were the guy she talks about in her songs. LOL. :grin:

TardisBlue
31-10-19, 23:43
Olive Garden is terrible, but Zizzi is infinitely worse. Like I said, my British renters think our chains like Applebee's are great so that tells me all I need to know. :)

Did you see that plate of pasta I posted? It looks like an abomination we have here called Chef Boyardee; it's canned pasta. Some poor children I knew actually liked it. :( It's soupy, the pasta is flaccid and soft, and the stuffing tastes the way I imagine dog food tastes. YUCK!

My daughter had pasta at Zizzi, and it looked like the pic you posted. Yes, yuck!


Yes, I like British baked goods; I'm a devotee of the tv show "The Great British Bake Off". :) The best desserts are still, however, imo, the French and German ones. The Italians are rubbish at desserts in comparison so far as I'm concerned.

Are they? I wanted to taste Cannoli, but I've never had a chance to try them out. They don't seem to have that in France (I don't live in a big city). I admit I have a sweet tooth, though I know it's not good for health and I'm trying to avoid sugar, except when I go to a restaurant (which seldom happens). I had a Neapolitan cake in London, it was good but not exceptional. Oh, and I forget: tiramisu is delicious!

Angela
01-11-19, 03:19
My daughter had pasta at Zizzi, and it looked like the pic you posted. Yes, yuck!



Are they? I wanted to taste Cannoli, but I've never had a chance to try them out. They don't seem to have that in France (I don't live in a big city). I admit I have a sweet tooth, though I know it's not good for health and I'm trying to avoid sugar, except when I go to a restaurant (which seldom happens). I had a Neapolitan cake in London, it was good but not exceptional. Oh, and I forget: tiramisu is delicious!

Well, everything is relative. Taken as a whole, I don't think Italian desserts compare favorably with French and German desserts. However, certain specific areas have good desserts. Cannoli are a bit heavy, but good. Sfogliatelle are, I think, really good, as our our version of cream puffs. Really, all Neapolitan pastry is quite good, and certain Sicilian desserts as well. Yes, tiramisu is delicious, although not terribly original. Sort of like an English trifle, I think.

https://www.disgracesonthemenu.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/pasticcini_wp.jpg

If you're ever in New York City, you should go to Ferrara's Bakery. It's in what's left of Little Italy.

Also, the Lidia Bastianich market, Eataly, has a decent assortment...
https://www.bravotv.com/sites/bravo/files/field_blog_image/2016/08/the-feast-eataly-promote.jpg

davef
01-11-19, 04:58
If you eat "foreign", as in Indian, Chinese, Italian, etc. I think it can be good, so long as you keep away from the chains. I tried Zizzi when I was last there. It's like Olive Garden if it was 50% worse.

I mean, look at this monstrosity:
https://i.imgur.com/LM6TGi4.png[
English food itself I don't like, nor do food critics rate it very highly. I can't stand pub food, for instance, as the pastry at the ones I've tried was stodgy and tough. Nor do I like kidneys. I'm not a fan of the vaunted "full English" breakfast, either. Black pudding??? Also, the worst baked beans I've ever eaten in my life. So long as you stick to bacon eggs and toast it's O.K.

I rent out my condo to a lot of British people over the summer. How they can stand Florida in July and August I don't know, but I'm happy to have them. They're always thrilled by the food, they tell me, by which they mean places like Applebee's and Chico's etc!

It's gotten better over the years, though. When I was in England for my honeymoon, I stuck it out a week and then started crying over dinner one night, so we went back to France to finish up our trip.
What's the ooze covering the pasta supposed to be? I never had pasta that looks like that

davef
01-11-19, 05:14
My daughter had pasta at Zizzi, and it looked like the pic you posted. Yes, yuck!



Are they? I wanted to taste Cannoli, but I've never had a chance to try them out. They don't seem to have that in France (I don't live in a big city). I admit I have a sweet tooth, though I know it's not good for health and I'm trying to avoid sugar, except when I go to a restaurant (which seldom happens). I had a Neapolitan cake in London, it was good but not exceptional. Oh, and I forget: tiramisu is delicious!
I'm going to cross this zizzis off my list. This is due to my dad's description of Olive Garden as the "McDonalds" of Italian restaurants and I'm no fan of McDonalds and it's cheap poison Big Mac fatburger

Salento
01-11-19, 06:18
I'm going to cross this zizzis off my list. This is due to my dad's description of Olive Garden as the "McDonalds" of Italian restaurants and I'm no fan of McDonalds and it's cheap poison Big Mac fatburger

I tried the “impossible whopper” couple of weeks ago @ Burger King. (Curiosity) LOL
The fake meat was too dry. It was just one time event.
I'll order the real thing next time :)

Carlos
02-11-19, 03:24
https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-sGrlxq87zoY/XbzZ3I8Dk4I/AAAAAAAABN4/I4RE43JF2hkTs1XPG97mIn4pMWe6yUUFwCLcBGAsYHQ/s640/Tarta%2Bde%2Bchocolate.jpg

I love everything you've put, everything. I make these chocolate, cream and angel hair cakes to my family. I do everything, the cake to fill, the custard, I put the cream, less angel hair and cherries is completely homemade. I get rustic and homemade, I do not seek perfection because I am more coarse than a plow making cakes, I like that they remain rustic and coarse.

Boreas
02-11-19, 18:21
Not their beans dish, the sauce is heavy for me.

Maciamo
03-11-19, 12:41
Yes, I like British baked goods; I'm a devotee of the tv show "The Great British Bake Off". :) The best desserts are still, however, imo, the French and German ones. The Italians are rubbish at desserts in comparison so far as I'm concerned.

Really? I quite like Italian desserts, especially panna cotta, tiramisu, tartufo and zabaione (pictured below). Gelato could also be considered a dessert.

https://www.cucchiaio.it/content/cucchiaio/it/ricette/2009/12/ricetta-zabaione-freddo-liquore-mandorle/jcr:content/header-par/image_single.img10.jpg/1410271887814.jpg

For my part I think that variety is the key to enjoyment, but I am relatively selective for desserts in each country.

Among British desserts I like cheesecakes, carrot cakes and crumbles, but I am not a fan of fudge, shortcake or trifle.

In Belgian/French desserts, nothing beats a good homemade mousse au chocolat with Belgian chocolate, but I also love a good charlotte aux framboises (pictured below), crème brûlée, fondant au chocolat, profiteroles or mille-feuilles.

http://files.meilleurduchef.com/mdc/photo/recette/charlotte-framboise/charlotte-framboise-640.jpg

Regarding German desserts, I'd go for the baumkuchen, Black Forest, and my favourite of all Rote Grütze (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R%C3%B8dgr%C3%B8d), a speciality of North Germany and Denmark, which I discovered in Berlin.

Here is the Rote Grütze with vanilla sauce.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-stnhU7EmjIY/UfQaa9fBWWI/AAAAAAAAA8k/jjmNVaql6Vg/s1600/Rote+Gr%C3%BCtze+Vanillecreme.jpg

Angela
03-11-19, 18:02
Really? I quite like Italian desserts, especially panna cotta, tiramisu, tartufo and zabaione (pictured below). Gelato could also be considered a dessert.

https://www.cucchiaio.it/content/cucchiaio/it/ricette/2009/12/ricetta-zabaione-freddo-liquore-mandorle/jcr:content/header-par/image_single.img10.jpg/1410271887814.jpg

For my part I think that variety is the key to enjoyment, but I am relatively selective for desserts in each country.

Among British desserts I like cheesecakes, carrot cakes and crumbles, but I am not a fan of fudge, shortcake or trifle.

In Belgian/French desserts, nothing beats a good homemade mousse au chocolat with Belgian chocolate, but I also love a good charlotte aux framboises (pictured below), crème brûlée, fondant au chocolat, profiteroles or mille-feuilles.

http://files.meilleurduchef.com/mdc/photo/recette/charlotte-framboise/charlotte-framboise-640.jpg

Regarding German desserts, I'd go for the baumkuchen, Black Forest, and my favourite of all Rote Grütze (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R%C3%B8dgr%C3%B8d), a speciality of North Germany and Denmark, which I discovered in Berlin.

Here is the Rote Grütze with vanilla sauce.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-stnhU7EmjIY/UfQaa9fBWWI/AAAAAAAAA8k/jjmNVaql6Vg/s1600/Rote+Gr%C3%BCtze+Vanillecreme.jpg


I like all those Italian desserts except for panna cotta, which I can take or leave. However, I was really talking about baked goods. In that realm, as I also mentioned above, virtually all Neapolitan pastry and Sicilian sweet baked goods as well are, imo, delicious, as is tiramisu.

There are very few offerings from other places in Italy which can compare with, especially, Austrian and German baked goods. I think it may be because there's not a real tradition of eating sweet pastries, etc. after every meal, except if you're in a restaurant. In my own part of Italy, it's strictly for holidays, and, as I said, perhaps in restaurants. I never saw it offered after a normal meal. Even then, most of them are rather dry and uninspired.

My mother was a stupendous cook, better than either of the uncles in my family who owned very successful restaurants, and yet she had to learn how to bake here, because her mother and aunt never baked when she was growing up.

My friend's Bavarian mother and grandmother, on the other hand, baked a sweet every single day, as well as sweets to be eaten at breakfast, and she told me this was very common.

It's just different customs leading to a different cuisine, perhaps, or maybe we just don't have as much of a sweet tooth. I certainly don't. Give me some salami and cheese any day. :)

Btw, Zabaione I never eat, not because it doesn't objectively taste good, but because I associate it with my mother force feeding the more liquid version into me as a child because I had pneumonia two winters in a row when I was three and four. She was deathly afraid of tuberculosis, but couldn't get me to eat eggs. I would gag and run from the room. That was her solution. I'm sure foreigners would be aghast at a mother giving her child something with a bit of alcohol and coffee in it, but no one thought anything of it, just as no one thought it odd that a lot of children were given mixed wine and water at meals. As I said, different cultures.

TardisBlue
03-11-19, 19:08
I'm sure foreigners would be aghast at a mother giving her child something with a bit of alcohol and coffee in it, but no one thought anything of it, just as no one thought it odd that a lot of children were given mixed wine and water at meals. As I said, different cultures.

In France too, children were given mixed red wine with water during lunch. I remember drinking it at almost every meal at my grandmother's place (though it was very diluted). But people hardly ever do that anymore now, even in the countryside. Most kids drink soda with lots of sugar, fruit juice or cordial. It's so much healthier! :-/

Angela
03-11-19, 19:35
In France too, children were given mixed red wine with water during lunch. I remember drinking it at almost every meal at my grandmother's place (though it was very diluted). But people hardly ever do that anymore now, even in the countryside. Most kids drink soda with lots of sugar, fruit juice or cordial. It's so much healthier! :-/

They call it baptized wine! :)

There's even a picture of me holding an upturned fiasco (straw covered) flask up to my mouth. It was empty. Probably one of my nonna's renters gave it to me for a joke to take the picture.

Never does anyone any harm, from what I can tell. My father was one of eleven, and among them, their spouses, and all the multitude of first cousins, not one has a problem with alcohol.

valentinavalley2
03-11-19, 20:09
Try cottage pie, it’s the best British food by far...https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20191103/0595e4c581102031021a01d8e4963c7c.jpg


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Maleth
03-11-19, 23:12
Dropping in for a minute, I’m on vacation currently in London, and I must say it is a really beautiful city. I loved it from the minute we got here. I particularly want to mention how much I adore British cuisine, specifically nose to tail. Yes, it fantastic! Last night I ate deviled kidneys, bone marrow on parsley salad, snails and barely, and lamb broth. Today I had scotch eggs, and various meat pies for lunch. I’m looking forward to dinner tonight.

I absolutely love and appreciate British food!

Never thought of snails as being British...Most Brits I know cannot stomach snails as much as Rabbit :). Hope you tried Roast beef and Yorkshire pudding with lots of rich dark gravy. The irony is that Most Brits now have Pasta Bolognese, Lasagnia (suspicious foods in the 70's) Indian Curry at par with good ole Roast beef as their favorite home cooked dishes :). Shepherds / Cottage pie and Cornish pastries make a good bite. Fish (Cod) and chips still an old favorite and well done makes a hearty meal, my favorite with mushy peas (not keen on the gravy beans or curry that can come with it). Dont forget there are some excellent British cheeses to discover too. Rhubarb and custard is my favorite desert any time and I can eat Christmas pudding all year round.

Salento
05-11-19, 06:38
Dropping in for a minute, I’m on vacation currently in London, and I must say it is a really beautiful city. I loved it from the minute we got here. I particularly want to mention how much I adore British cuisine, specifically nose to tail. Yes, it fantastic! Last night I ate deviled kidneys, bone marrow on parsley salad, snails and barely, and lamb broth. Today I had scotch eggs, and various meat pies for lunch. I’m looking forward to dinner tonight.

I absolutely love and appreciate British food!

Wondering if you've visited some of the places that Liv.DNA assigned to you,

regardless of accuracy (could be Roman DNA) and if possible, I would it done anyway.

... would’ve been interesting :)

about the food:
I should have said earlier what the Black Pudding is made of, but sometimes it’s better not to know.
(I regret finding out after I ate it ...) :petrified:

Carlos
05-11-19, 21:19
I was collecting (other days I go hunting) snails in some oleander hedges and an old man passed by and said to me: strongly affected. I don't care they would have great. And the truth is that they were strong but I loved them. What does not kill you, get you fat.

Salento
05-11-19, 22:33
I was collecting (other days I go hunting) snails in some oleander hedges and an old man passed by and said to me: strongly affected. I don't care they would have great. And the truth is that they were strong but I loved them. What does not kill you, get you fat.

To find good quality Snails, after a night of drizzling or light rain, people would go early in the morning in the massive artichoke fields near the town of Brindisi (about 30 Km from my town in Italy).

After that, they fed the Snails white flour for a couple of days, only then were ready to be cooked or sold.

For longer lasting, they would put the Snails in boxes with dirt and white flour, eventually, the Snails would retreat in their shells by forming a dry white seal.
Add water to wake them up :)

Pax Augusta
06-11-19, 00:11
Cheesecake is common now in Italy. You can find it in the version closest to the original or in some variants more "Italian-like".

Tutkun Arnaut
06-11-19, 01:05
The water doesn't come from anywhere near Canada, which is about 300 miles away. It comes from the Catskills and the Delaware catchment area, which are maybe an hour or an hour and a half north and northwest of the city. It's a beautiful part of the country.
https://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/water_pdf/nycsystem.pdf
http://i1.nyt.com/images/2016/03/22/nyregion/00water-slide-TQ8J/00water-slide-TQ8J-tmagArticle-v4.jpg

It's true that the best Italian restaurants and even pizzerias import canned tomatoes, romano and parmigiano cheese (hard cheeses), olive oil, etc. from Italy. However, some neighborhood pizzerias don't. Mozzarella, which spoils very quickly, is almost always locally sourced.

One of the reasons Italian American cooking is different from Italian cooking is precisely because a lot of ingredients weren't frequently available in the early years. I think I remember that when we first came we couldn't get prosciutto, for example.
I come often in NY City. Close by where I live is big fruit market. Now is the season of apples and outside there are crates with apples, visibly appealing, large sizes, healthy looking. Until you taste them! What a disappointment when I compare with my country of origin apples. I think they come from New York area, but it must be the soil. So I insist quality of food depends where the ingredients are coming from. England imports large amounts of food from elsewhere, so it could be their food nowadays taste good. In Mediterranean area there are about 300 sunny days per year so every food has enough heat and light to be ripe. I don't think that's the case with English produce

Salento
06-11-19, 01:55
BBC Nov. 4 2019 - The World’s oldest-known Recipes Decoded

...from Yale University’s Babylonian Collection

.... A team of international scholars versed in culinary history, food chemistry and cuneiform studies has been recreating dishes from the world’s oldest-known recipes ...

... The instructions for lamb stew read more like a list of ingredients than a bona fide recipe: “Meat is used. You prepare water. You add fine-grained salt, dried barley cakes, onion, Persian shallot, and milk. You crush and add leek and garlic.” But it’s impossible to ask the chef to reveal the missing pieces: This recipe’s writer has been dead for some 4,000 years.

Instead, a team of international scholars versed in culinary history, food chemistry and cuneiform (the Babylonian system of writing first developed by the ancient Sumerians of Mesopotamia) have been working to recreate this dish and three others from the world’s oldest-known recipes. It’s a sort of culinary archaeology that uses tablets from Yale University’s Babylonian Collection to gain a deeper understanding of that culture through the lens of taste...

http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/20191103-the-worlds-oldest-known-recipes-decoded

Carlos
06-11-19, 02:13
To find good quality Snails, after a night of drizzling or light rain, people would go early in the morning in the massive artichoke fields near the town of Brindisi (about 30 Km from my town in Italy).

After that, they fed the Snails white flour for a couple of days, only then were ready to be cooked or sold.

For longer lasting, they would put the Snails in boxes with dirt and white flour, eventually, the Snails would retreat in their shells by forming a dry white seal.
Add water to wake them up :)

Yes, we do it that way too.

https://elgourmetdeandalucia.com/wp-content/uploads/caracoles-vaso.jpg

I think that is how the hunters began to make friends with the farmers.

http://www.cordobahoy.es/media/cordobahoy/images/2016/05/15/2016051517322970427.jpg
There are even fairs like this one in Córdoba with 46 stalls selling snails.

We also like this smaller "cabrillas" variety and with those lists we like them very much, with a broth made with herbs and thistles from the field, they are delicious as well as the drunk broth.

Angela
06-11-19, 02:20
I come often in NY City. Close by where I live is big fruit market. Now is the season of apples and outside there are crates with apples, visibly appealing, large sizes, healthy looking. Until you taste them! What a disappointment when I compare with my country of origin apples. I think they come from New York area, but it must be the soil. So I insist quality of food depends where the ingredients are coming from. England imports large amounts of food from elsewhere, so it could be their food nowadays taste good. In Mediterranean area there are about 300 sunny days per year so every food has enough heat and light to be ripe. I don't think that's the case with English produce

It's not the case with American produce either. Plus, they pick the fruit when it's not ripe to account for the time that will be eaten up by transport and stocking in supermarkets.

It's more than the soil, and the shorter growing time, however.

They've changed the varieties for visual appeal or size and sometimes flavor is sacrificed. That's the case with tomatoes, which are absolutely terrible in the U.S. in my opinion. The ones I buy from farm stands on Long Island in August and September have ripened on the vine, but they're still nowhere as flavorful as they are in Italy or other countries bordering the Med.

This is what they wanted visually and for ease in transport (they don't bruise as easily), but they bred the flavor right out of them.
https://oldworldgardenfarms.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/the-celebrity-tomate.jpg


Some local farmers have gone back to what they call "heirloom tomatoes", which are not uniform at all, but are better tasting, and for whatever reason the cherry tomatoes are still good. Hard to slice cherry tomatoes
for a sandwich, though. :)

https://d3m7xw68ay40x8.cloudfront.net/assets/2013/06/18163508/heirloom-tomatoes-1.jpg

Even with Italian tomatoes, however, the rich, volcanic soil of the areas of Campania near Vesuvio produce tomatoes that are better than any others I've ever eaten. All the produce in Campania is fabulous. Ours in the north doesn't compare at all, although infinitely better than what I can get here. Their seafood is much, much better as well, although the Adriatic coast aquatic resources come close.