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johen
11-11-19, 06:33
She is a singer.

https://images.sipse.com/NAjHa-zIfTJryo8n3MiH5ImY2Lc=/800x497/smart/imgs/072015/170715d31ede94d.jpg (https://images.sipse.com/NAjHa-zIfTJryo8n3MiH5ImY2Lc=/800x497/smart/imgs/072015/170715d31ede94d.jpg)

johen
12-11-19, 09:58
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lHIAR8k1EyQ

MOESAN
26-12-19, 18:47
She could be of a lot of places in Eurasia. Why not Balkans? (not to say there would be something as A balkanic type!); a bit of "South" spite a mean pigmentation. But I know some girls like that in S-W Europe, in France too.
That said, if the record is good, she has not the "Irish" voice or their way to do with it (for me).

MOESAN
26-12-19, 18:50
Just to play with you, Johen. Not my favourite sport. I prefer states than individuals. Have a good training for the New Year's Eve.

Angela
26-12-19, 19:18
Sorry, Johen, if this spoils the game, but she's indeed Irish, or at least half Irish. When I went to youtube to listen to the song, the next one to come up was a song that's more recent and has her full name: Shannon Leeman. A quick google search says she's the daughter of the Irish consul in a Mexican city. The surname is also Irish. It matches her looks. However, if you told me she was half Mexican I wouldn't be surprised, necessarily, especially if the Mexican side was mostly "Iberian" in ancestry. I think there's more "Med" in her than there is in some Irish women.

Duarte
26-12-19, 20:12
Gabriela Duarte. Brazilian actress. Ibero-descendant. Much like Shannon, at least in the pic in the first post’s link.

Gabriela:

https://i.imgur.com/w5TwDE6.jpg

Shannon:

https://i.imgur.com/WHxAlPH.jpg

MOESAN
27-12-19, 17:49
Sorry, Johen, if this spoils the game, but she's indeed Irish, or at least half Irish. When I went to youtube to listen to the song, the next one to come up was a song that's more recent and has her full name: Shannon Leeman. A quick google search says she's the daughter of the Irish consul in a Mexican city. The surname is also Irish. It matches her looks. However, if you told me she was half Mexican I wouldn't be surprised, necessarily, especially if the Mexican side was mostly "Iberian" in ancestry. I think there's more "Med" in her than there is in some Irish women.

As you say, she is not the better example for Irish women.
Concerning surname, he is not taken in account in Edw. MacLysaght's book about "Surnames of Ireland".
I just found this, serious enough seemingly, but not by force the Gospel:
Last name: Leeman SDB Popularity ranking: 9034

Recorded as Leman, Leeman and the patronymic Leemans, this is an English surname. Deriving from the pre 7th century elements "Leof-mann" with leof meaning beloved and "mann," a friend, it is first recorded in the famous Domesday Book of 1066 as Leman of Hampshire. Other early personal name recordings include Lemannus de Fordham in the register of Holme Abbey, Norfolk in 1175, and the strange variant of "Lufmancat" also from Hampshire, in 1273. The surname development may also have a later Huguenot influence as the name is recorded heraldically for the Province of Holland. The medieval surname development includes recordings such as William Lemmon of Worcester in 1275, whilst a much later recording taken at random from church registers is that of Robert Leeman who married Ann Campions at St. Martin's Church, Stamford Baron, Northamptonshire, on November 27th 1788. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Reiner Leman. This was dated 1185, in the Knight Templar (crusader) register forthe county of Essex, during the reign of King Henry 11nd of England, 1154 - 1189.


Read more: https://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Leeman#ixzz69K4KbP5A

Angela
27-12-19, 18:13
As you say, she is not the better example for Irish women.
Concerning surname, he is not taken in account in Edw. MacLysaght's book about "Surnames of Ireland".
I just found this, serious enough seemingly, but not by force the Gospel:
Last name: Leeman

SDB Popularity ranking: 9034

Recorded as Leman, Leeman and the patronymic Leemans, this is an English surname. Deriving from the pre 7th century elements "Leof-mann" with leof meaning beloved and "mann," a friend, it is first recorded in the famous Domesday Book of 1066 as Leman of Hampshire. Other early personal name recordings include Lemannus de Fordham in the register of Holme Abbey, Norfolk in 1175, and the strange variant of "Lufmancat" also from Hampshire, in 1273. The surname development may also have a later Huguenot influence as the name is recorded heraldically for the Province of Holland. The medieval surname development includes recordings such as William Lemmon of Worcester in 1275, whilst a much later recording taken at random from church registers is that of Robert Leeman who married Ann Campions at St. Martin's Church, Stamford Baron, Northamptonshire, on November 27th 1788. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Reiner Leman. This was dated 1185, in the Knight Templar (crusader) register forthe county of Essex, during the reign of King Henry 11nd of England, 1154 - 1189.


Read more: https://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Leeman#ixzz69K4KbP5A


More than a few Irish people bear English surnames. It's a function of the conquest of Ireland. Who knows, they might have originally been Irish Protestants who converted or at least reconciled with the Irish Republic.

If I saw her here in the U.S. my initial reaction would be standard "Irish/English colonial/German" "white girl" mix, although the nose might indicate some Italian as well.

As I said, if someone told me there was some "Mexican", with a bit of Amerindian in her, I wouldn't be surprised, given the width of the face and the cheekbones, although some people can fool you.

Jessica Biel always claimed to be part Amerindian, and I swore I saw it. She was tested and it turns out it's not true, which surprised her. In her case it must just be a throwback to some kind of more archaic European HG look.

Pre-nose job:
https://i.pinimg.com/originals/6c/0e/7c/6c0e7c6aad8315af08d338ceac40e0bd.jpg
"Her paternal great-grandfather was the son of Hungarian-Jewish (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Jews_in_Hungary) immigrants, which she discovered on the show Who Do You Think You Are? (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Who_Do_You_Think_You_Are%3F_(U.S._TV_series));[12] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jessica_Biel#cite_note-12)[13] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jessica_Biel#cite_note-13) she also has German (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_people), French (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_people), English (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_people), and Scandinavian (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scandinavian_Peninsula) ancestry."

MOESAN
27-12-19, 18:32
Thanks Angela. My aim was to provide some possible clues for the origin of the name, not to challenge her irish origin. Some protestant (or anglican?) people of Ireland bore evident English surnames, too evident sometimes, like Sexton, partly English,partly from an Irish surname anglicized.