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View Full Version : Neolith DNA reveal distinct ancient HLA allele pool and population transform in europ



jose luis
23-11-19, 20:38
http://doi.org/10.1101/851188

I1a3_Young
23-11-19, 23:50
We noted 28 different mitochondrial haplotypes and 9 different Y-DNA haplotypes

This is from 25 males and 10 females.

Supplementary table 1 where these will be shown isn't available yet. Any guesses as to the 9 types? Obviously the hunter/gather I2 and the farmer G2a should be there. What else? I'm a bit surprised to see 9 different Y haplos represented in a pre-steppe European pop. Nine of the males had the same Y haplo. I'm going to guess these 9 are G2a.

As for the mito - that's also a very high group of unique lines in one sample area. 28????? very surprising.

Page 7 has skin/hair pigmentation info, appears mixed with 14/42 with dark hair/skin. Three of them had heterozygous SNPs at those locations. Three were blue eyed/light, 7 were brown eyed, and 8 were heterozygous.

Autosomally they were modeled as Anatolian Neo and Lochsabour HG (38-54%). All with available SNPs were lactose intolerant (no surprise).

HLA types indicated a higher resistance to viral infections but an increased weakness to bacterial infections.

They noted HLA DRB1*15:01 was totally absent in this culture but high in the bronze age (20%).

I've often suspected disease played a large role in the IE invasion population shift. The conquering males are much more likely to mate with conquered females than conquered males were to mate with conquering females. The males were passing their steppe Y-DNA and HLA types to the children, which had a better survival chance. The children of the conquered males had less chance to survive the diseases which would still be prevalent. The steppe Y-DNA probably came with a "bonus package" of health and survivability.

I1a3_Young
24-11-19, 00:31
11617

Map

Angela
01-12-19, 19:48
So, maybe the higher WHG we see in some of the later Bronze Age steppe admixed people came from incorporation of people like these?

I wonder why there was selection against viral infections in particular. A hunter-gatherer would certainly be exposed to a lot of non-helpful bacteria as well.

Angela
01-12-19, 19:49
This is from 25 males and 10 females.

Supplementary table 1 where these will be shown isn't available yet. Any guesses as to the 9 types? Obviously the hunter/gather I2 and the farmer G2a should be there. What else? I'm a bit surprised to see 9 different Y haplos represented in a pre-steppe European pop. Nine of the males had the same Y haplo. I'm going to guess these 9 are G2a.

As for the mito - that's also a very high group of unique lines in one sample area. 28????? very surprising.

Page 7 has skin/hair pigmentation info, appears mixed with 14/42 with dark hair/skin. Three of them had heterozygous SNPs at those locations. Three were blue eyed/light, 7 were brown eyed, and 8 were heterozygous.

Autosomally they were modeled as Anatolian Neo and Lochsabour HG (38-54%). All with available SNPs were lactose intolerant (no surprise).

HLA types indicated a higher resistance to viral infections but an increased weakness to bacterial infections.

They noted HLA DRB1*15:01 was totally absent in this culture but high in the bronze age (20%).

I've often suspected disease played a large role in the IE invasion population shift. The conquering males are much more likely to mate with conquered females than conquered males were to mate with conquering females. The males were passing their steppe Y-DNA and HLA types to the children, which had a better survival chance. The children of the conquered males had less chance to survive the diseases which would still be prevalent. The steppe Y-DNA probably came with a "bonus package" of health and survivability.

Sorry I'm out of juice. Good post.

MOESAN
05-12-19, 00:43
So, maybe the higher WHG we see in some of the later Bronze Age steppe admixed people came from incorporation of people like these?

I wonder why there was selection against viral infections in particular. A hunter-gatherer would certainly be exposed to a lot of non-helpful bacteria as well.

Apparently these final Neolithic cultures of Western Germany had links and maybe demic contacts with Atlantic France (Western Armorica and around). Some scholars had thought there had been demic input from West to Seine-Oise-Marne SOM Culture, itself in relation with Michaelsberg culture. The SOM people showed phenotypicaly a mix of Chassean Neolithic people from S-E France with Danubian Neolithic people of Central Europe and with Mesolithic descendants.
Some years ago I thought the "tank" of Mesolithics resurgence in Late Neolithic Europe was in Scandinavia or Northern Europe. The diverse Neolithic cultures of these regions don't show any strong return of HG's descendants over diverse "Mediterranean" Neolithic people, even lately, even in FBC.TRBK, spite GAC shows a slight stronger regain. Finally it was in Iberia that the LN shows the strongest return of HG's input. So I began to think into Atlantic Europe, France at first, with its dense megalithic network and surely, as elsewhere, a rising of the Y-I2a input not refuted by the scarce sample of Megalithers we have to date in France. It was evident that the true "tank" was in Western Europe. I am not amazed at all.
To be precise we lack more details about the uniparental haplo's (the Y-ones in first place, maybe western subclades of mt-H too) to confirm or debunk this.