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Mrt19
15-07-21, 14:22
Im Turkish and i wanted to ask if my YDNA G2a1a1a1a1a1b1 is common? same with my MTDNA H2a2a1? and where they came frome :)

Gilgamesh
16-07-21, 22:56
Im Turkish and i wanted to ask if my YDNA G2a1a1a1a1a1b1 is common? same with my MTDNA H2a2a1? and where they came frome :)

G2a1a1a1a1a1b1 = G-Z31461 its 2100 years old its most likely Caucasian (Georgian,Ossetians, Chechens,Karachay,Balkar ...) All your cousins on Yfull : https://yfull.com/tree/G-Z31461/

Mrt19
16-07-21, 23:59
And what about MTDNA H2a2a1

Mrt19
17-07-21, 00:21
And Thank you!

Gilgamesh
19-07-21, 07:46
And what about MTDNA H2a2a1

TMRCA 2400 years, all your cousins on Yfull :

https://www.yfull.com/mtree/H2a2a1/

Haplogroup H mtDNA (EUPEDIA) :

https://www.eupedia.com/europe/Haplogroup_H_mtDNA.shtml

skoal
24-03-22, 06:12
are you have Lazlar ancestry? where you parents & grandparents came from?

Mrt19
24-03-22, 21:22
are you have Lazlar ancestry? where you parents & grandparents came from?
sadly idk my grandparents all are from Ordu and i have only one Grandmother who is from Trabzon

sharenorth
10-06-22, 11:24
The development of population-based varieties has greatly aided our understanding of the genetic underpinnings of inherited diseases in humans. The genetic structure of Turkey was studied using 3,362 unrelated patients whose complete exomes (n = 2,589) or whole genomes (n = 773) were sequenced to create a Turkish (TR) Variome that might aid disease gene discovery in Turkey. We discovered considerable mixing between Balkan, Caucasus, Middle Eastern, and European groups, indicating a closer genetic link of the TR population to Europeans than previously understood, which is consistent with Turkey's history as a crossroads between Europe and Asia. When compared to 1000 Genomes Project populations, we observed that 50% of TR individuals had significant inbreeding coefficients (0.0156), with runs of homozygosity longer than 4 Mb identified exclusively in the TR population. We also discovered that the present TR population is home to 28% of exome variants and 49% of genome variants in the very rare range (allele frequency 0.005). To aid genome-wide association studies, we annotated these variants based on their functional consequences to create a TR Variome containing alleles of potential medical significance, a repository of homozygous loss-of-function variants, and a TR reference panel for genotype imputation using high-quality haplotypes. These data provide a great resource for future studies to find variants related to certain traits and to establish the phenotypic consequences of mutations in specific genes, to provide information on the genetic structure of the present TR population.