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View Full Version : 12% of al-Andalus women are non-Spanish



Mmiikkii
08-10-22, 14:53
The moors seem to have brought very few women, and among those it's mostly slaves.
This could be due to the locations, maybe if there are palaces slaves are overrepresented...

13620

Angela
08-10-22, 18:10
Anyone who, after spending some time on sites such as this, still thinks that mtDna, or yDna, for that matter, determines ethnicity, should find another hobby.

Mmiikkii
09-10-22, 00:12
It does...
Different ethnic groups have distinct subclades.

Wanderer
09-10-22, 04:27
Anyone who, after spending some time on sites such as this, still thinks that mtDna, or yDna, for that matter, determines ethnicity, should find another hobby.No it determines lineage. Ethnicity is cultural.

Angela
09-10-22, 04:50
I'm not going to engage in idiotic conversations. R1b carrying West Africans are West Africans despite the fact they carry yDna R1b. Do you understand?

Sicilian women who carry mtDna found more frequently in North Africa are still SICILILAN WOMEN. Their mtDna is less than 2% of their total genome. It may have some health consequences but it doesn't change the fact they're SICILIAN.

Likewise, those Andalusian women are SPANISH.

If you can't intellectually grasp this, find another hobby. You also certainly don't belong on a site which tries to showcase genetic facts not silly internet jibber jabber.

Mmiikkii
09-10-22, 15:05
How do you respond to scientists that use the presence of R0a, L haplogroups as indication of admixture with foreign people?

Because is the main message of all papers that show a change in ancestry, assuming something foreign must have come to the land, and change the gene pool... It's obvious by the way that that happened.

You see a new haplogroup, someone came... 2+2=4

Angela
09-10-22, 16:13
I have said probably hundreds of times on this site that you use uniparentals to track migrations.

What you don't do is use uniparentals to determine "ETHNICITY", or "IDENTITY", because they represent only 2% or so of your entire genome.

Hence, yes, these markers in these Spanish women indicate there was some admixture. However, with the passage of hundreds of years the autosomal signal gets diluted. Do you understand? So, these women are as Spanish as anyone else.

Plus, going by your point of view, at what point did the Spanish become Spanish? The people of the Iberian peninsula are a combination of WHG, Anatolian farmers, Iranian farmers, steppe admixed Bell Beakers, and yes, North Africans. Some of that North African dna shows up in the Neolithic, although it seems that yes, the majority came with the Moors.

What, you're going to draw a line and say everybody with 2% of their ancestry arriving after this point is not Spanish? I would think 1200 years would be enough.