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Lina Inverse
07-06-04, 02:43
I've now compiled a detailled chart for the German pronunciation which also includes the equating English sounds with example words and the official Ipa pronunciation :cool:
Archive (http://web.uvic.ca/ling/resources/ipa/handbook/German.zip) containing sound files demonstrating the German sounds
Test your hearing! (http://www.interdeutsch.de/Uebungen/umlaut.htm) Can you tell the German sounds apart, especially the umlauts? Click on the mouth to hear the audio sample and select either A or B.


German Ipa English Example
letter sound sound (corresponding sound capitalized)

Vowels
a [a] ah fAther
[] a Appetite
au [aU] ow knOW
e [e] eh Education
ei [aı] see ex. EYE, wIne
eu/u [oY] oi/oy vOIce, bOY
i/ie [i] ee/ih nIpple
o [o] oh Order (but less open)
[] see ex. similar to 'u' in hurry
u [u] oo mOOn
[y] see ex. like 'u' in French "cte azure"

Consonants
b [b] b Beer (can sound like p at the end of a syllable)
ch 1 [] - voiceless: as in German "ich"
ch 2 [x] - voiced: as in Scotch loch or German machen
never like choco, only like k in foreign words
d [d] d Deep (can sound like t at the end of a syllable)
f [f] f Free
g [g] g/gh Grateful, GHerkin, never like Gin!

(can sound like voiced ch at the end of a word)
h [h] h Happy
j [j] y Yeah
k [k] k Keep
l [l] l Love
m [m] m Mighty
n [n] n Nice
p [p] p Pretty
qu [q] qu QUick
r [r] (r) softer than English r
s 1/ [s] s voiceless: Sunny
s 2 [z] z voiced: Zealous
sch 1 [ʃ] sh voiceless: SHiny
sch 2 [ʒ] j w/o d voiced: as in Jungle, but without initial d
sp [ʃp] shp (beginning of a word only, also in compound words)
st [ʃt] sht (beginning of a word only, also in compound words)
t/th [t] t Titilating
v 1 [f] f voiceless: Fine (as in German "viel")
v 2 [v] w voiced: Want (as in German "Vase")
w [v] w Winner
z [ts] ts wiTS

Kuroki-Kaze
07-06-04, 13:16
hey thats acctualy not to bad. i dont think i could make one up. i can speak it but damned if i know why things are the way they are... like at skool my teacher asked me "why is hund a der word".. i just thought and said.. it just sounds right lol. yeah but that chart will help a lot... some i dont agree with but hey >.<

Lina Inverse
12-06-04, 03:37
hey thats acctualy not to bad. i dont think i could make one up. i can speak it but damned if i know why things are the way they are... like at skool my teacher asked me "why is hund a der word".. i just thought and said.. it just sounds right lol. yeah but that chart will help a lot... some i dont agree with but hey >.<
So, you have a German mother and Greek father (or the other way round?) and live in the US? How come?

Well, "Hund" is the male form, so it needs the male article (der). It's also often used as unspecific classification without expressively meaning it's male.
The female form would be "die Hndin".

lexico
20-02-05, 20:54
Hi, Lina !
Nice page; I wish we could have something like this in other languages, too ! :cool:
But some of the characters come out garbled.
Do you know how to type IPA symbols in a post ?
Anyone ? :?

Lina Inverse
20-02-05, 23:48
Hi, Lina !
Nice page; I wish we could have something like this in other languages, too ! :cool:
But some of the characters come out garbled.
Do you know how to type IPA symbols in a post ?
Anyone ? :?
You'll have to set the Codepage to "Western" (Iso-8859-1), then it displays fine.
I used the charmap to look for the Ipa chars.

sgt. Pepper
20-02-05, 23:53
Is there even any rule for der, das and die? :/

Lina Inverse
21-02-05, 00:01
Is there even any rule for der, das and die? :/
"der" is male, "die" is female and "das" is neutrum.

bossel
21-02-05, 03:11
Is there even any rule for der, das and die? :/
Not really. You can distinguish some forms by their endings, but in most cases there are so many exceptions that IMO you couldn't make rules thereof.

some suffix rules:
-keit = f
-heit = f
-lein = n
-chen = n (like -lein, this is a diminutive suffix, hence M&#228;dchen - girl - is also grammatically neuter)

Substantivised adjectives & verbs are generally neuter.

Sensuikan San
21-02-05, 04:06
... and I find that this is one of the things that makes German, along with some of the Celtic languages like Irish, so confusing !

There is no correlation between biological gender and grammatical gender !

This is real tough if you are a native English ( .... or Japanese, I believe...) speaker - where there is little or no reference to grammatical gender !

Regards,

W