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    If I read well he was referring to Dalmatia (Alb....

    If I read well he was referring to Dalmatia (Alb. delme = sheep): "Dalmatia which was part of Illyria, now Croatia".
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    Which language rules are you thinking about ? ...

    Which language rules are you thinking about ?

    There's something puzzling in Albanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Romanian and even some Serbian dialects, and this is the use of the post-clitic...
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    DuPidh, as I have said, I won't take into...

    DuPidh, as I have said, I won't take into consideration political arguments here, since it doesn't help the debate to go forward.

    And: I don't believe in automatic connections between genetics and...
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    Thank you. That's exactly the kind of clear and...

    Thank you. That's exactly the kind of clear and concise answer I expected :)

    If I understand well, "Illyrian" is rather an ethnic category - as described by the ancient Greeks - than a distinct...
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    Albanian and Illyrian

    I know that the subject has been widely debated here, but could someone summarize in a few words, and without the interference of politic considerations, what is the typology of Albanian and its...
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    I think there is a rule where proto-Uralic *p →...

    I think there is a rule where proto-Uralic *p → Hungarian f.

    I was reading a paper about Mansi lately, an Uralic language from the Ob river - and actually ugrian, not fennic. You have f.ex....
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    Well, there will be a HUGE divergence of opinion...

    Well, there will be a HUGE divergence of opinion there : the idea of a Copper Age proto IE is, to me, just a joke. Not only is it unproven, as well genetically as archaeologically, but it is, from a...
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    about rix: Yes, but it doesn't make any...

    about rix:



    Yes, but it doesn't make any difference whatsoever : k → χ before s is a purely Celtic lenition process, Grimm's Law has nothing to do with that. Moreover, this is "allophonic" as...
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    A quote from Meillet's Caractéristiques des...

    A quote from Meillet's Caractéristiques des Langues Germaniques, written about a century ago in the context of an overwhelmingly structuralist and ideologically aryan academic world :

    Quand une...
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    If two words show the regular sound changes of...

    If two words show the regular sound changes of their respective language family, then the words are inherited from the same source (IE or not) and are in no case considered as loanwords. Considering...
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    PIE *g → Germ. [k] → Celt.[k] : borrowing from...

    PIE *g → Germ. [k] → Celt.[k] : borrowing from Germanic to Celtic, no wonder here.



    There is no *ō in bhrāgo. Maybe you are referring to the one in the PGmc. reflex brōka, but the rule...
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    I suppose you are talking about borrowings from...

    I suppose you are talking about borrowings from Celtic to Germanic ? But if a word has undergone the effects of Grimm's Law, then it is Germanic, and the Celtic word is a loanword from Germanic. As a...
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    Grimm's law states that, under certain...

    Grimm's law states that, under certain conditions, PIE p* is adapted as an f in Germanic. You postulate (as most linguists do) that, by way of purely mechanistic evolution (assimilations and...
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    That's quite impossible since Etruscan had no ...

    That's quite impossible since Etruscan had no voiced stops nor fricatives at all, so the [v] hypothesis is excluded (it had not even the [z] sound). This absence of voiced consonants (except...
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    my defense : Exactly, hence, at the time...

    my defense :



    Exactly, hence, at the time when Etruscan was spoken, there was no [f] in Gaulish.



    ... under the influence of Etruscan, according to Bonfante (and may be others, I'll...
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    Since you probably don't have Bonfante's book at...

    Since you probably don't have Bonfante's book at hand, here is how the flexion looks like

    The word is clan "son" (see also Irish...)

    SINGULAR

    Nom/Acc: clan
    Gen: clen-s
    Dat: clen-si
    Acc...
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    Thank you for your answer, Taranis, I'll try to...

    Thank you for your answer, Taranis, I'll try to answer to your objections regarding an hypothetic etruscan/germanic connection.

    - [f]: the sound is generally germanic and not IE (Grimm's Law), I...
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    My source is "The Etruscan Language : An...

    My source is "The Etruscan Language : An Introduction" by G & L. Bonfante. The book is very factual and doesn't try to connect Etruscan with anything - or yes, it compares very thoroughly Latin and...
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    OK, I take it: which are the connections between...

    OK, I take it: which are the connections between Etruscan and Klingon ? :)

    Well, to be honnest, my remark was completely amateurish, I was just reading the book and found these similarities rather...
  20. 32 vowels in Danish, 33 consonants in Irish... I...

    32 vowels in Danish, 33 consonants in Irish... I think that the guys who listed the phonemes included all the possible dialectal and allophonic variations - same for Norwegian, Russian, etc. And I'm...
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    Etruscan and Germanic

    Well, let's be clear right from the begining, I won't propose nor defend any theory about the origins of the Etruscans and the Germans based on daring speculations about their haplogroups. I just...
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    I wouldn't connect these words to any haplogroup...

    I wouldn't connect these words to any haplogroup in particular (R1b is also pre-IE for the most part). But incidentally, I wrote two papers related to this matter: one is devoted to the possible...
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    Trugarez vras deoc'h - ha da ho respont ivez ! ...

    Trugarez vras deoc'h - ha da ho respont ivez !



    I agree, but I cannot find the germanic etymon... the proposed "trechen" (to pull) goes back to the problem of meaning we both mentioned...
  24. That's right, and this is accurately the point....

    That's right, and this is accurately the point. In this respect, it is very interesting to look at the way creole languages appeared in the Carribean islands: French creoles have a French lexicon,...
  25. I agree completely with Moesan about this...

    I agree completely with Moesan about this orthography (or "mute consonants") question.

    Digging deeper in this Celtic influence upon French as far as phonetics are concerned, it has been...
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