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    Celtic Tomb Sheds Light On Iron Age Trade

    The logic is circular, since in most cases archeologists did not test the genetics of the bodies they found and assumed that if one was found with a sword, it must be male. They made the same mistake with Scythian finds, but subsequent DNA testing showed that a small percentage of those...
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    Celtic Tomb Sheds Light On Iron Age Trade

    There was no cultural discontinuity between Hallstatt and La Tene. Scholars have agreed on a specific date after which the culture was to be referred to as La Tene rather than Halstatt, and the separate name was applied to the period when the culture expanded westward and also came under the...
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    Pompeii's Villa of the Mysteries Restored and Reopened

    I've always been fascinated with the Villa of the Mysteries. It's too bad we'll never be able to fully understand how those people saw the world and how they experienced the mysteries.
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    Celtic Tomb Sheds Light On Iron Age Trade

    The first recorded use of the term "Celtae" to refer to the various Celtic speaking tribes was by the Greek geographer Heataeus of Miletus in 517 BC. The modern use of the term "Celt" came into vogue among ethnographers about 300 years ago.
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    Celtic Tomb Sheds Light On Iron Age Trade

    I don't have time to educate someone who seems to lack a basic knowledge of Celtic culture, but here's a website that will get you started on the role of women in Celtic culture, including the role of Celtic women rulers and warriors, both historical figures such as Boudicca and Cartimandua, and...
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    Celtic Tomb Sheds Light On Iron Age Trade

    There have in fact been some Celtic burials found that consisted of a female skeleton with a sword, and many historical accounts refer to Celtic women warriors.
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    Celtic Tomb Sheds Light On Iron Age Trade

    I realize that it is slightly anachronistic to refer to the Celts of what is now France of 2500 years ago as Gauls, but I was trying to understand what Sile meant by calling those Greek and Etruscan objects Gallic and not Celtic. I guess some mysteries aren't meant to be solved.
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    Celtic Tomb Sheds Light On Iron Age Trade

    UltraViolence mentioned La Tene because we're trying to understand what you meant by calling the art "Gallic" and not Celtic. Strictly speaking, the term "Gallic" does not yet quite apply to the people of France 2500 years ago at the start of the Iron Age in France, when the Celtic Hallstatt...
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    Celtic Tomb Sheds Light On Iron Age Trade

    Okay, it's already been explained to you that the art was imported and made by Greeks and Etruscans and that if one uses the word "Gallic" in reference to that time period, one is talking about the Gauls, a Celtic group, so what are you talking about?
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    Celtic Tomb Sheds Light On Iron Age Trade

    Given that the Gauls were Celts, you seem to be making a distinction without a difference.
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    History xx14, the true turn of century in European history

    If we could look at events from the point of view of the megafauna of the Americas, such as the mammoth, which seemed to become extinct after the arrival of Amerindians, that event would seem very important, in a negative way. But Amerindians do view the arrival of Europeans as a kind of...
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    Celtic Tomb Sheds Light On Iron Age Trade

    What a wonderful find. I do hope that geneticists get a crack at those bones. But the archeological material seems fascinating just by itself.
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    8000 Year Old British Wheat

    There's an article in Science Magazine about archeological research that has been happening for several years at an underwater site off the south coast of England, at a place called Baldnor Cliff, which has yielded numerous flint objects and plant matter. Some of the plant matter was recently...
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    Indo-European Language Originated On The Steppe?

    I got that from an online Proto-Indo-European dictionary I can't seem to find at the moment, but the University of Texas site says the Indo-European word for horse is ekuos and I found the word ekwos at an Indo-European dictionary site. So it looks as if the experts differ slightly, or perhaps...
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    Greatest Scandinavian contribution(s) to the world

    But the question was "What is/are Scandinavia's greatest contribution(s) to the world?". Do you think, for example, that literature is one of Scandinavia's greatest contributions to the world? Is that why you wrote down the names of Strindberg and Ibsen? As Maciamo said, there is a difference...
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    Indo-European Language Originated On The Steppe?

    Nobody is disputing that the Indo-European pastoralists migrated into areas of Europe that had crop farming and borrowed some agricultural terms from the people who were already living there. But certain words with relevance to pastoralists are of IE origin (e.g., the English word horse is...
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    Indo-European Language Originated On The Steppe?

    I suggest that you get a good dictionary and a book on the basics of linguistics and find out what the authors meant by the phrase "phylogenetic model". That will help you understand why they talked about Greek and Armenian versus Germanic and Balto-Slavic without specifically discussing what...
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    Indo-European Language Originated On The Steppe?

    Given that the paper is about the IE steppe hypothesis, I have no idea why you think it should concentrate on the development of Romance languages after the fall of the Western Roman Empire.
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    Indo-European Language Originated On The Steppe?

    I wasn't able to fully understand the first paper, which is written in a Romance language I'm not familiar with. The second paper roams over a vast expanse of time and geography, and seems to be suggesting that early Copper Age people from the Balkans brought IE languages to Anatolia during the...
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    Indo-European Language Originated On The Steppe?

    Dienekes seems to be more critical of the paper by Anthony and Ringe, although he did say he doesn't think the paper by Chang et al proves that the steppe hypothesis is more probable than the Caucasian hypothesis. And, considered in isolation, it probably doesn't, but when combined with new...
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