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View Poll Results: Which classical music composers do you know ?

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  • Vivaldi

    44 84.62%
  • Telemann

    14 26.92%
  • Haendel

    39 75.00%
  • Haydn

    35 67.31%
  • Mozart

    51 98.08%
  • Shubert

    40 76.92%
  • Beethoven

    52 100.00%
  • Brahms

    46 88.46%
  • Schumann

    39 75.00%
  • Chopin

    47 90.38%
  • Liszt

    32 61.54%
  • Mendelssohn

    37 71.15%
  • (Johann) Strauss

    40 76.92%
  • (Richard) Strauss

    32 61.54%
  • Elgar

    16 30.77%
  • Holst

    19 36.54%
  • Mahler

    25 48.08%
  • Bruckner

    14 26.92%
  • Tchaikovski

    45 86.54%
  • Grieg

    28 53.85%
  • Wagner

    41 78.85%
  • Bizet

    24 46.15%
  • Verdi

    34 65.38%
  • Debussy

    37 71.15%
  • Saint-Saens

    22 42.31%
  • Stravinski

    30 57.69%
  • Prokofiev

    23 44.23%
  • Shostakovich

    26 50.00%
  • JS Bach

    47 90.38%
  • JP Rameau

    8 15.38%
  • Dvorak

    29 55.77%
  • Paganini

    22 42.31%
  • Bartok

    17 32.69%
  • Sibelius

    17 32.69%
  • Berlioz

    17 32.69%
  • Rachmaninoff

    25 48.08%
  • Mussorsky

    15 28.85%
  • Pachelbel

    21 40.38%
Multiple Choice Poll.
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Thread: Which classical composers do you know ?

  1. #51
    Regular Member Michel Gilson's Avatar
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    It is a toss up between the Waltz King Johann Strauss II and J.S. Bach for my favorite composer. There are so many great composers to pick from. I think without question Bach, Beethoven and Mozart are in a class by themselves and then come all the rest. Personally I am partial to the waltz and hence my partiality for Strauss.

  2. #52
    Ulfheðinn Thulean's Avatar
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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo View Post
    Apart from the easy listenning Baroque (Vivaldi, Bach...) and Classical (Mozart, Haydn...),
    Excuse me Maciamo,
    what do you mean by "easy listening" when referring to Johann Sebastian Bach? It's a pity if you're missing the tremendous logical and mathematical subtleties hidden beneath the Musikalische Opfer, the Kunst der Fuge or the Goldberg Variationen, just to name a few... Just to give you an idea, the sheer aesthetic beauty of his music is doubled on the rational side; I suggest you take a deeper look on the subject, no doubt you'll discover a treasure of wonders.
    Last edited by Thulean; 17-11-13 at 17:57.

  3. #53
    Ulfheðinn Thulean's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by edao View Post

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ix7xdAl-qVs
    three ecossaises by chopin for an ecossais forum pal

  4. #54
    Ulfheðinn Thulean's Avatar
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    Btw - can somebody please amend the spelling of Schubert (not Shubert) in the multiple choice poll?
    Leave Mussorgski without a "g" if you want - but poor Schubert, so divinely genial and unfortunate, even with the spelling of his name...

  5. #55
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    2 members found this post helpful.
    Puccini is not on the list. That is hard to believe! What an omission.

  6. #56
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    /playlist/4elqshpf0ZX6LuF1MOsJEX?si=nYeovCnhTMqu2-SmNm8t3Q

    My wives playlist in spotify. Full of musical jewels. Enjoy

  7. #57
    Advisor Angela's Avatar
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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by adrianuslucas View Post
    Puccini is not on the list. That is hard to believe! What an omission.
    Or, a little further down the scale: Donizetti, Bellini, Scarlatti, Corelli, Pergolesi, Rossini, Monteverdi, Palestrina.


    Non si fa il proprio dovere perchè qualcuno ci dica grazie, lo si fa per principio, per se stessi, per la propria dignità. Oriana Fallaci

  8. #58
    Advisor Angela's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Or, a little further down the scale: Donizetti, Bellini, Scarlatti, Corelli, Pergolesi, Rossini, Monteverdi, Palestrina.
    How could I have forgotten Albinoni?

    I've posted him in the music thread. Glorious piece.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    How could I have forgotten Albinoni?

    I've posted him in the music thread. Glorious piece.
    The "Adagio in G Minor" is a glorious piece, but the modern consensus is that it's not by Albinoni, even though many recordings attribute it to Albinoni.

    Musicologist and Albinoni biographer Remo Giazotto (1910-1998) claimed to have discovered a manuscript fragment by Albinoni that he expanded into the Adagio in the 1940s. However, the manuscript was never produced, and no one else has found it. It seems Giazotto composed the entire adagio himself.

    It's strange that he didn't want to take full credit for such a beautiful piece, but perhaps it flattered his ego more to pass it off as a work by Albinoni.

    I'm not familiar with Albinoni's other works, he may deserve to be on the list anyway.

  10. #60
    Advisor Angela's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tamakore View Post
    The "Adagio in G Minor" is a glorious piece, but the modern consensus is that it's not by Albinoni, even though many recordings attribute it to Albinoni.

    Musicologist and Albinoni biographer Remo Giazotto (1910-1998) claimed to have discovered a manuscript fragment by Albinoni that he expanded into the Adagio in the 1940s. However, the manuscript was never produced, and no one else has found it. It seems Giazotto composed the entire adagio himself.

    It's strange that he didn't want to take full credit for such a beautiful piece, but perhaps it flattered his ego more to pass it off as a work by Albinoni.

    I'm not familiar with Albinoni's other works, he may deserve to be on the list anyway.
    I know the claim Tamakore, but I have some doubts about it. We'll probably never know.

    "The famous Adagio in G minor, the subject of many modern recordings, is thought by some to be a musical hoax composed by Remo Giazotto. However, a discovery by musicologist Muska Mangano, Giazotto's last assistant before his death, has cast some doubt on that belief. Among Giazotto's papers, Mangano discovered a modern but independent manuscript transcription of the figured bass portion, and six fragmentary bars of the first violin, "bearing in the top right-hand corner a stamp stating unequivocally the Dresden provenance of the original from which it was taken". This provides support for Giazotto's account that he did base his composition on an earlier source.[8]"





  11. #61
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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Thanks Angela for posting those other pieces by Albinoni. Even leaving aside the disputed adagio, Albinoni deserves to be on any list of baroque composers.

  12. #62
    Regular Member Regio X's Avatar
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    Love this music. :)

    Albinoni
    Op. 5 No. 11 in G Minor, from 1707



    Another version: https://youtu.be/9XILYVM7eKM?t=182

  13. #63
    Advisor Angela's Avatar
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    You're quite welcome. :)

    Baroque music has been my favorite for a long time, so I've listened to a "lot" of it.

    Something about it calms and soothes me. :)

  14. #64
    Regular Member Regio X's Avatar
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    I was listening Gluck and remembered of this thread. If I find the time I'll do a list of (several) additional composers I like pretty much.

    https://youtu.be/NZl_jErhlhY?t=1615

    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Or, a little further down the scale: Donizetti, Bellini, Scarlatti, Corelli, Pergolesi, Rossini, Monteverdi, Palestrina.
    Cherubini cannot be out of any list. :) I highlight the opera Medea and the Requiem in C minor, chosen by Beethoven for his own funeral.

    "One afternoon in 1817, the English composer Cipriani Potter was taking a stroll through the woods with Beethoven. Curious, Potter asked Beethoven, 'Apart from yourself, who do you considered the greatest living composer?' While Beethoven seemed initially startled, he eventually gave an equally startling answer in 'Cherubini'. Beethoven had always held Cherubini in high esteem, personally writing to him in 1823, 'I am enraptured whenever I hear a new work of yours and feel as great an interest in it as in my own works—in brief, I honor and love you.' Beethoven proclaimed Cherubini 'Europe’s foremost dramatic composer,' and he admired Cherubini’s Requiem in C minor to such extend that he ordered it performed at his own funeral."
    https://interlude.hk/ludwig-van-b-and-his-fellow-musicians/

  15. #65
    Regular Member Regio X's Avatar
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    Transition from Renaissance to Baroque.

    Giovanni Gabrieli - Sacrae Symphoniae (1597): Canzon primi toni a 8


  16. #66
    Regular Member Regio X's Avatar
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    Giovanni Battista Lulli - Marche pour la Cérémonie des Turcs (1670) | Modo Antiquo


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