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Thread: Difference of vocabulary between British and American English

  1. #1
    I love Sauerkraut! Shas's Avatar
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    I found out one and I'd be curious if its really american or just alabamerican

    British: molten
    American: melted
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    Anjin
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shas
    I found out one and I'd be curious if its really american or just alabamerican

    British: molten
    American: melted
    Those are two different words. Example...

    "molten rock"
    "melted cheese"

    They have similar meanings, but you can't use them interchangeably, like...
    "molten cheese"
    "melted rock"
    hehe - that sounds funny. That sounds like some super spicy cheese.
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  3. #3
    I love Sauerkraut! Shas's Avatar
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    oh ok

    it would logically make sense if it was the same word but well

    thanks for the help ^ ^

  4. #4
    The Hairy Wookie Mycernius's Avatar
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    I heard that Graham is considered a more 'English' name than 'American'
    I alos thing names like Ira, Brad and Randy are more American than English, as well as one like Mary-Sue and Billy-bob. They conjure up pick up trucks and banjos for some reason I've seen Deliverence. A friend of mine lives in North Carolina and says it was a documentry not fiction

    A few words:
    AmE -------- BrE
    line -------- queue
    mail ------- post
    overpass ------- flyover
    diaper ------- nappy
    sidewalk ------- pavement
    pants ------- trousers
    vacation ------- holiday

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    Regular Member Sensuikan San's Avatar
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    This is just too interesting... and an indication of the language barrier that my family and I had to overcome ...... (....cough ! cough !....)

    May I add a few - and add a comment.... ?

    AmE ....................... BrE

    Truck ...............................Lorry

    Traffic Circle.......................Roundabout

    Intersection........................Crossroads

    Subdivision..........................Housing Estate

    The War of 1812..................What ?

    .... but there is another, curious version of this, which is Canadian usage ... a kind of "half-way house" sometimes, between the other two.

    Whilst American usage (obviously) seems to dominate - English spelling prevails - as in colour, favour .... and anything else that Ben Franklin banned the "U" from (..but not always .... !).

    In addition, a "queue" can still be a "queue" - whilst "line" is frequently used without comment. On the East coast, I am told, - even "petrol" is still bought by some folks rather than "gas", and it would appear pretty normal to ask for the "bill" rather than the "check" at a restaurant.

    There are also also a few words and phrases that seem to be unique to Canada .... but perhaps this deserves a sub-thread .... !

    Perhaps our Australian, New Zealand and South African friends can add their comments, too ?

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  6. #6
    Satyavrata Maciamo's Avatar
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    BrE

    I have split my original thread "Difference of USAGE between British and American English" and created "Difference of VOCABULARY between British and American English", as some people couldn't refrain from showing their knowledge of the different words between BrE and AmE, although that was not the purpose of my thread.

    For a comprehensive explanation on the differences between British and American English see the Wikipedia article. It also provides external links with extensive differences in vocabulary.
    Last edited by Maciamo; 29-12-11 at 10:17.
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    The Hairy Wookie Mycernius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo
    I have split my original thread "Difference of USAGE between British and American English" and created "Difference of VOCABULARY between British and American English", as some people couldn't refrain from showing their knowledge of the different words between BrE and AmE, although that was not the purpose of my thread.

    For a comprehensive explanation on the differences between British and American English see the Wikipedia article. It also provides external links with extensive differences in vocabulary.
    We're all just a bunch of showoffs

  8. #8
    Satyavrata Maciamo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mycernius
    We're all just a bunch of showoffs
    No it isn't. I teach the differences between BrE and AmE regularily to my Japanese students. But no book or website will explain the differences of usage of words that are the same. That is what I was interested to discuss and nothing else.

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