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View Poll Results: How do you usually pronounce these words ?

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  • 1.1 : Often => usually "ofen" (silent "t")

    11 55.00%
  • 1.2 : Often => usually "often" ("t" pronounced)

    5 25.00%
  • 1.3 : Often => either of them

    3 15.00%
  • 2.1 : Direct => usually "dairect"

    7 35.00%
  • 2.2 : Direct => usually "direct"

    7 35.00%
  • 2.3 : Direct => usually "derect"

    6 30.00%
  • 2.4 : Direct => any of them

    0 0%
  • 3.1 : Associate => usually "esoshiate" ("c" pronounced like "sh")

    6 30.00%
  • 3.2 : Associate => usually "esosiate" ("c" pronounced like "s")

    11 55.00%
  • 3.3 : Associate => either of them

    3 15.00%
Multiple Choice Poll.
Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: How do you pronounce these words ?

  1. #1
    Satyavrata Maciamo's Avatar
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    How do you pronounce these words ?

    Apart from difference between BrE and AmE , some words in English have more than one acceptable pronuciation, regardless of where the speaker come from (US, Canada, UK, Australia...). I suppose that some people may even change their pronuciation of these words according to their mood. For example :

    - often : the "t" can be pronounced or silent

    - direct (director, direction, etc.) : can be pronounced like "dairect", "direct" or "derect" (the last one is definitely more American though).

    How do you usually pronounce these ?
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  2. #2
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    Since I was just assigned to write an essay about lexical phonology, I just have to answer ;P This is post-lexical phonology, though, but somewhere near the theory anyway!

    I say them as in options 1.1, 2.1 and 3.1. But then again, I have a British accent ^^;

    Just curious, why such a question?
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  3. #3
    Lovely Angel BrennaCeDria's Avatar
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    Dammit, I meant to hit 3.3 instead of 3.2. Anyway, 1 and 2 are answered correctly for me, and the third depends on how I'm using the word--if it's a verb, one way, and if a noun, the other.

  4. #4
    カメハメ波! Glenn's Avatar
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    I've changed the tally to reflect how you wanted to vote, Brenna.

  5. #5
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    Thanks. ^_^

  6. #6
    Regular Member sgt. Pepper's Avatar
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    1.2 : Often => usually "often" ("t" pronounced), 2.2 : Direct => usually "direct", 3.2 : Associate => usually "esosiate" ("c" pronounced like "s")

    That's how i pronounce it.

  7. #7
    Co-owner: Jovesca Records jovial_jon's Avatar
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    1.1, 2.1 and 3.1. Although I might put the 't' in often every now and then, I wouldn't say I do it enough to change my choice.
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  8. #8
    Regular Member misa.j's Avatar
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    1.1 Often (with silence 't')
    2.2 Direct (direct)
    3.2 for a noun associate ('c' pronounced like 's'), but for a verb 3.1 ('c' pronounced like 'sh')

  9. #9
    The Hairy Wookie Mycernius's Avatar
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    1.2 Always say the 't'
    2.2 Direct
    3.2 is the closest to how I say Associate. I've a tendency to say 'A'sso instead of 'E'sso

  10. #10
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    usually "ofen" (silent "t")
    usually "direct"
    usually "esosiate" ("c" pronounced like "s")

  11. #11
    Satyavrata Maciamo's Avatar
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    I should add other categories, like :

    - route : pronounced "root" (like in French) or "raut".

    - poor : rhyming with "your" or with "door".

  12. #12
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    You'd need to take other things into account,as well-such as Southern accents.
    There is no sound difference in Texas when saying 'your' and 'door'.
    The most noticeable thing about a Texas accent is an extremely flattened 'i' sound.This is also heard all along the Gulf Coast.

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