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Thread: Rice in European food

  1. #26
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    Here in Portugal, rice is a very important suplement, seen that we have it almost every meal. Whether it is with meat, fish, or just vegetables. We eat it in a lot of different ways and many times we eat rice and potatoes together with something else (which I consider a mistake).

  2. #27
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    Rice pudding is a dish made from rice mixed with water or milk and sometimes other ingredients. Different variants are used for either desserts or dinners. When used as a dessert, it is commonly combined with a sweetener.

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    Rice is my favorite dish so I like this recipe!
    I want to make such a dish with a rice!

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Rice with milk we usually eat at home sometimes. The paella that is a Valencian dish but that has long been adopted by all Spaniards in their diet. Rice with asparagus. Non dry dried rice with peeled prawns, squid is like a paella but more simplified.

    Potatoes I would eat every day. We have the salmorejo that in Cordoba as a gazpacho base but in the province of Cádiz with that term we have a dish based on cooked potato, with boiled egg, spring onion, parsley and seasoned with olive oil and vinegar, a kind of salad of potato

    We also have a dish called arroz a la cubana, which is boiled rice passed through the pan to make it more tasty, tomato sauce and on top of the mountain a fried egg and two salsichas.
    In the traditional stew in the broth you can put noodles or very little rice so that the broth does not thicken.


    Sticky rice with monkfish and shrimp. It can be done in a thousand ways, prawns and squid, prawns and peas, e.t.c.

  5. #30
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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Carlos View Post
    Rice with milk we usually eat at home sometimes. The paella that is a Valencian dish but that has long been adopted by all Spaniards in their diet. Rice with asparagus. Non dry dried rice with peeled prawns, squid is like a paella but more simplified.

    Potatoes I would eat every day. We have the salmorejo that in Cordoba as a gazpacho base but in the province of Cádiz with that term we have a dish based on cooked potato, with boiled egg, spring onion, parsley and seasoned with olive oil and vinegar, a kind of salad of potato

    We also have a dish called arroz a la cubana, which is boiled rice passed through the pan to make it more tasty, tomato sauce and on top of the mountain a fried egg and two salsichas.
    In the traditional stew in the broth you can put noodles or very little rice so that the broth does not thicken.


    Sticky rice with monkfish and shrimp. It can be done in a thousand ways, prawns and squid, prawns and peas, e.t.c.
    It all looks and sounds delicious. I love rice, and potatoes. Really like Spanish and Portuguese food in general. The only thing I quibble with is how in some areas and restaurants the beef and lamb are too well done. I'm with the French: unless you're stewing it, it should be no more than medium rare. Italians are sometimes guilty of overcooking these meats too.



    My mother often made me a "soup" of hot milk and rice with butter and sugar and sometimes a bit of cinnamon when I came in from the cold, sort of a very milky rice pudding :)

    Minestra di riso al latte: a little misjudgment there as it needs more milk.



    Non si fa il proprio dovere perchè qualcuno ci dica grazie, lo si fa per principio, per se stessi, per la propria dignità. Oriana Fallaci

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    I have no idea why people enjoy eating rice. White rice doesn't have taste, just full of carbohydrates.
    I really enjoy much more traditional European food, with history of 5 thousand years at least. Long live BUCKWHEAT!!!
    Be wary of people who tend to glorify the past, underestimate the present, and demonize the future.

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    Can't talk to a man who would prefer buckwheat (yuck) to risotto and paella. :)


    Your WHG and EHG ancestors ate a ton of seafood and fish. This should be right up your alley.

    Don't yell at me if it's not authentic enough, Carlo. :)




    I guess you turn up your nose to Amerindian potatoes too? Not me. I bless them every time I eat them. :)



    Seriously, I don't know much about buckwheat, but rice has the ability to absorb incredible amounts of flavor from the foods with which it is mixed. As for "Chinese" white rice, I would have to agree with you. I don't see the point of it. To me, it's dry as dust. I only eat roast pork fried rice, which is, of course, much more fattening. :) Thank God for a good metabolism.


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    I'm not lying when I say this but I tend to buy an extra container of white rice when I buy Chinese to have as a snack later on when I feel hungry at night. I don't know why I like it but I just do, maybe it's the texture
    mmmmmmmmm dooouuughhhnuuuutz

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    ^^To each their own. I use it to make the rice, milk, sugar soup I pictured above, or Sicilian fried rice balls.



    Technically, they should be made with arborio rice, but waste not want not, as they say.

    Taste in food is as different as attraction in mates.

    Whatever makes you happy is my motto.

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by davef View Post
    I'm not lying when I say this but I tend to buy an extra container of white rice when I buy Chinese to have as a snack later on when I feel hungry at night. I don't know why I like it but I just do, maybe it's the texture
    I've never eaten a bowl of white rice. Pork fried rice only. (Rarely)
    Chinese Chihuahua Isotope. LOL

  11. #36
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    Cuban rice is a dish that children like very much, also to the elderly. It is a dish of Cuban cuisine of Spanish origin. I do not remember it in my children's diet, but in the 80's It came back from nothing and became very popular. At the beginning it was made with banana but then the bananas were replaced by sausages, in other latitudes I would like with bacon strips. Children love rice simply boiled and mix everything, but if you pass the rice a little in the pan better, at least for an adult.

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    Some brilliant mind has converted the "pasta alla gricia" (a Lazio and center-italian typical recipe) in a risotto.
    I haven't experienced it yet, but the temptation is strong.

    Here it is.

    Ingredients for 2 people

    Preparation time: 30 minutes
    Difficulty: Easy
    • Pork cheek (“Guanciale di maiale”), 120 g;
    • Carnaroli rice, 120 g;
    • Pecorino Romano cheese, 50 g;
    • Black pepper, abundant;
    • Salt to taste.
    • Chicken broth 350 ml.

    Preparation

    Slice the pork cheek into strips. In a saucepan, brown it with soft flame so that it loses a large part of its fat and become crispy. Then remove it from the pan, keeping aside all the fat filtering it with a strainer: it will serve to stir in the risotto.

    Toast the rice in the same saucepan without adding fat until it becomes translucent. Sprinkle it with a glass of wine and add a ladle of the chicken stock at a time and cook (about 16 minutes).

    Whip the risotto with the pecorino cheese, the butter and the cheek fat, adjusting it with the stock in order to obtain a perfect consistency. Serve the rice in a plate and sprinkle it with plenty of minced black pepper.

    Complete the plate with the strip cheek in the center.

    This is the original link for the recipe
    https://chefincamicia.com/ricette/pr...o-alla-gricia/

    Enjoy your meal! ;)

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuvanè View Post
    Some brilliant mind has converted the "pasta alla gricia" (a Lazio and center-italian typical recipe) in a risotto.
    I haven't experienced it yet, but the temptation is strong.

    Here it is.

    Ingredients for 2 people

    Preparation time: 30 minutes
    Difficulty: Easy
    • Pork cheek (“Guanciale di maiale”), 120 g;
    • Carnaroli rice, 120 g;
    • Pecorino Romano cheese, 50 g;
    • Black pepper, abundant;
    • Salt to taste.
    • Chicken broth 350 ml.

    Preparation

    Slice the pork cheek into strips. In a saucepan, brown it with soft flame so that it loses a large part of its fat and become crispy. Then remove it from the pan, keeping aside all the fat filtering it with a strainer: it will serve to stir in the risotto.

    Toast the rice in the same saucepan without adding fat until it becomes translucent. Sprinkle it with a glass of wine and add a ladle of the chicken stock at a time and cook (about 16 minutes).

    Whip the risotto with the pecorino cheese, the butter and the cheek fat, adjusting it with the stock in order to obtain a perfect consistency. Serve the rice in a plate and sprinkle it with plenty of minced black pepper.

    Complete the plate with the strip cheek in the center.

    This is the original link for the recipe
    https://chefincamicia.com/ricette/pr...o-alla-gricia/

    Enjoy your meal! ;)
    Brilliant indeed. :) I'm making it tomorrow. Well, I'll make it if I can find guanciale.

    Oh, the hell with it, I'll use pancetta if I have to...

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Brilliant indeed. :) I'm making it tomorrow. Well, I'll make it if I can find guanciale.

    Oh, the hell with it, I'll use pancetta if I have to...
    Eheh... good job: guanciale is a product not always on hand.
    In this case it's better not to be too purist: a smoked pancetta of good quality can be a valid substitute

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    Rice in European food

    Since May ,I was feeding my Chow with 2 bowls of Rice 1 spoonful ground beef 2 spoons dry dog food ,2 times a day,my Chow is 5 months old,weight 52 Lbssome body told me dont feed my Chow with too much Rice,because High Sugar from Rice will caused Diabetes to the dog ??Is this true ??any comments / advice.........thanks

  17. #42
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    [CITA = Timothybrate; 566575] Desde mayo, estaba alimentando a mi Chow con 2 tazones de arroz 1 cucharada de carne molida 2 cucharadas de comida seca para perros, 2 veces al día, mi Chow tiene 5 meses, pesa 52 libras El cuerpo me dijo que no comiera mi Chow con demasiado arroz, porque el alto contenido de azúcar del arroz causó la diabetes al perro? ¿Es cierto? ¿Algún comentario / consejo ......... gracias [/ QUOTE]

    The best option is a high-end industrial feed if you can not or do not want to spend so much money a mid-range feed. Fresh meat has very little protein for a dog and compound feed already has rice, so you are giving your dog a minimum of feed by adding natural meat and rice to increase the amount so your dog will have a bad growth generating in the future health problems that will force him to have an expense in veterinarians and treatments spending ten times more than what is now being saved by cheating himself. Boiled rice mixed with bread crumbs goes well a day or two when the dog has diarrhea from having eaten something in the street or at home that should not.

    Choose a brand and do not change. Dogs have very few taste receptors on the tongue compared to humans, they split the food and swallow, they do not turn the food around in their mouth, they are guided by the smell. To be changing the brand dog with the argument that it must be boring to always eat the same thing is a human projection. Brand changes are not good because they control the intestinal flora of the dog. With 5 months has to eat three times a day. I am not in favor of measuring the quantities, at first it will seem that he eats more than the bill and it is a ruin but he ends up regulating himself and will eat what he needs. From 7 months, two servings a day and a year, 1 serving a day. If he is of big race and male as I understood, I would give him puppy fodder until he was two years old, if he is a female until one and a half years old, then he goes to one for an adult dog.

  18. #43
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    Is European rice of the japonica or indica variety?

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by ratchet_fan View Post
    Is European rice of the japonica or indica variety?
    I don't know about other countries, but Italian rice varieties like Carnaroli and Arborio are japonica strains.

    I think the American brands like Carolina and Uncle Ben's are indica. The Uncle Ben's is also parboiled, which I don't like, so when using American brands I use Caroline rice.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    I don't know about other countries, but Italian rice varieties like Carnaroli and Arborio are japonica strains.

    I think the American brands like Carolina and Uncle Ben's are indica. The Uncle Ben's is also parboiled, which I don't like, so when using American brands I use Caroline rice.
    Interesting. Thanks. I'm curious how japonica rice strains got so far west. If they were indica I guess the vector would have been the southern silk road from India to Iran to Anatolia to Southern Europe.

    I'm not a fan of American rice brands. They may be indica but nothing compared to what you can find in Iranian or Indian markets.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by ratchet_fan View Post
    Interesting. Thanks. I'm curious how japonica rice strains got so far west. If they were indica I guess the vector would have been the southern silk road from India to Iran to Anatolia to Southern Europe.

    I'm not a fan of American rice brands. They may be indica but nothing compared to what you can find in Iranian or Indian markets.
    I've always assumed the American rice was introduced via English planters, in the Carolinas, for example. Why it's different from actual Indian rice I don't know.

    Italians use the short grain rice because we cook it slowly with occasional ladle fulls of a hot liquid, either a vegetable or chicken or fish broth, and as a result the "dish" becomes very creamy, almost soupy. However, if you don't eat it right away it can get sticky, like sushi rice.

    I had a great deal of trouble with "American" rice when I first came here because I found it so dry as to be almost inedible until I got used to it.

    Risotto from our Italian rice:


    With porcini mushrooms


    Milanese style with saffron and stewed veal shank

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    I've always assumed the American rice was introduced via English planters, in the Carolinas, for example. Why it's different from actual Indian rice I don't know.

    Italians use the short grain rice because we cook it slowly with occasional ladle fulls of a hot liquid, either a vegetable or chicken or fish broth, and as a result the "dish" becomes very creamy, almost soupy. However, if you don't eat it right away it can get sticky, like sushi rice.

    I had a great deal of trouble with "American" rice when I first came here because I found it so dry as to be almost inedible until I got used to it.

    Risotto from our Italian rice:


    With porcini mushrooms


    Milanese style with saffron and stewed veal shank
    Looks delicious. Mushroom risotto is one of my favorite dishes.

    I'm guessing rice spread along the Northern Silk Road from China to Italy?

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by ratchet_fan View Post
    Looks delicious. Mushroom risotto is one of my favorite dishes.

    I'm guessing rice spread along the Northern Silk Road from China to Italy?
    Actually, it's much more recent. There was a local rice in Lombardia starting maybe 15th century which they got from the Spaniards ruling Southern Italy. I have no idea where the Spaniards got it. However, it was destroyed by some fungus in the late 1700s, so in the 1800s rice was imported from China and Japan because their varieties were resistant to this blight. It may be the climate in those areas was good for it too. It's a continental climate in Lombardia, Piemonte where it's grown.

    Then they had to figure out how to make it creamy. :)

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    They def did a good job out of making it creamy. I never understood the appeal of dry, sticky rice. Italians do rice the best. Only Persians can compete imo.

    Either way its crazy how rich and diverse European food is. I don't understand the dumb people who claim "white food" is boring.

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