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View Poll Results: What kind of cheese do you like to put on your pasta ?

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37. You may not vote on this poll
  • Grated parmesan

    24 64.86%
  • Cut/sliced pieces of parmesan in block

    5 13.51%
  • Grated Emmental or Gruyere

    5 13.51%
  • Grated mozzarella

    4 10.81%
  • Other kind of cheese

    6 16.22%
  • I don't put cheese on my pasta (or don't eat pasta)

    5 13.51%
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Thread: What kind of cheese do you like to put on your pasta ?

  1. #26
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    There are so many great cheeses, French and Spanish as well as Italian. I love manchego, for example. I can sometimes also get Mahon. A lot of Spanish cheeses are not available, however.

    The French ones are wonderful too and much more available. This is just a small number of them:



    This is just a small selection of Italian cheeses:



    Why would anyone eat "American" cheese? It's not even real cheese. For grilled cheese sandwiches I use mozzarella or a mild Cheddar, or muenster.

    My absolute favorite is the Neapolitan "Mozzarella in carozza". If you haven't tried it you should; you may never go back to regular grilled cheese sandwiches. :)

    This is the way I was taught to do it by my husband's Neapolitan grandmother. I think it's about as traditional as you can get. I've only made a few changes. I hate pancarre or "American" bread, so I use thinly sliced ciabatta bread or even Tuscan bread and just cut off the crusts. I also don't deep fry it. It uses up so much oil and makes a mess. Also, instead of putting one anchovy fillet, I just put a little smear of anchovy paste. Americans are too afraid of anchovies. If you put a little bit people won't even know it's there, they'll just know it's delicious! :)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1THEd1GcGs


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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    As you say, it depends on the dish. With a putanesca, if I put any cheese I'd put grated pecorino. If it's a meat sauce, I'd put grated parmigiano.

    I think Americans have gotten it into their heads that they should put parmigiano on everything. That's not how it is in Italy.
    That's true, I wouldn't put it on for example pasta with clams, or mussels, or mushrooms, or broccoli. For pasta with broccoli, or broccoli rabe, I'll put some lemon and a little bit of salt.

    Usually my mother or father will make pasta with meat sauce; a mix of braciole, veal, lamb, etc. in tomato sauce. My mother admits that my dad's towns' version of it is better than her's; and learned it from his mother.

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    Parmesana or Gran Pardano.

    But i think Pecorino is also a good one.

    I like also alot the Spanish Manchego or some local Greek cheeses like Graviera or Kefalotyri or Dry Myzithra
    but Non Greeks probably don't know these Greek cheeses though they are very good.


    In general the chesse has to be rather dry/hard and tasty i woud say

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jovialis View Post
    That's true, I wouldn't put it on for example pasta with clams, or mussels, or mushrooms, or broccoli. For pasta with broccoli, or broccoli rabe, I'll put some lemon and a little bit of salt.

    Usually my mother or father will make pasta with meat sauce; a mix of braciole, veal, lamb, etc. in tomato sauce. My mother admits that my dad's towns' version of it is better than her's; and learned it from his mother.

    Yes, I think a lot of Italians call it "gravy". Nonna Anna, my husband's grandmother, made it, and it was delicious. I would make it more often but for whatever reason my husband never liked it that much.

    I basically do this, as far as technique is concerned, except for the fact that I add tomato paste to the sauteed onions before adding the meat, and Nonna used just beef, sausage, and maybe spareribs, no ground beef, and once the sauce was almost done, would add fried meatballs that she had made separately. In the old, poorer days I think they used really cheap cuts of meat, like neck and shoulder bones. If I see them in the market I still throw them in: the tastiest meat is near the bone. I sometimes substitute beef short ribs for the chuck too, and put in some veal chunks. I'm trying to approximate the taste of manzo by combining the beef and veal.

    This girl gives me hope for young Italian women: she's really good. :)


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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Yes, I think a lot of Italians call it "gravy". Nonna Anna, my husband's grandmother, made it, and it was delicious. I would make it more often but for whatever reason my husband never liked it that much.

    I basically do this, as far as technique is concerned, except for the fact that I add tomato paste to the sauteed onions before adding the meat, and Nonna used just beef, sausage, and maybe spareribs, no ground beef, and once the sauce was almost done, would add fried meatballs that she had made separately. In the old, poorer days I think they used really cheap cuts of meat, like neck and shoulder bones. If I see them in the market I still throw them in: the tastiest meat is near the bone. I sometimes substitute beef short ribs for the chuck too, and put in some veal chunks. I'm trying to approximate the taste of manzo by combining the beef and veal.

    This girl gives me hope for young Italian women: she's really good. :)

    We call it that too, or ragu. I want to learn how to make it myself, as well.

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    makaronia fits with every cheese due to salt,

    just straight makaronia, with no sauce

    I think the best cheese is ladotyria Λαδοτυρια
    hard cheese stored olive oil with herbs
    a fantastic cheese for makaronia

    secondary is the Kefalograviera a Hybrid of Kefali (pressed) and graviera (gruyere) made in N Greece, Thessaly and Makedonia

    Graviera (gruyere) which is mostly produced in S Greece
    IT IS NOT GRUYERE, only the name due to the method of production

    Kefali kefalotyri is typical all Greece but mainly in North
    it is very old and the older the harder and best for makaroni
    and the younger the smoother best for barbeque
    There are 2 kinds
    the one from pasterized milk
    the one from unpasterized milk which is rare and fantastic
    but you want find it in cheese industry
    All women in my family know to produce such cheese,
    and sometimes i make my shelf, as hobby
    easy to make the first act,
    difficult to make it 'mature'
    I Like 6 months old

    the old non pasteurised method of kefali
    is comparable/simmilar to Parmigianno-Reggiano method
    instead of metallic 'mixer' spinner, used wooden knifes
    and sheep's milk instead of cow's
    making a fantastic result which sometimes blend with herbs or smoke
    industry and health laws slowly removed it from production
    and today is made exclusively with pasteurized milk
    and mostly by adding calcium chemicals
    instead of the old 'acid (bacillus reserve) water'
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    ΑΤΗ ΛΑΜΒΑΝΕΙΝ ΑΥΤΟΙΣ
    ΥΒΡΙΣ ΓΕΝΝΑΤΑΙ
    ΝΕΜΕΣΙΣ ΚΑΙ ΤΙΣΗ ΑΚΟΛΟΥΘΟΥΣΙ ΔΕ

    When there is no shame
    Divine blindness conquers them
    Hybris (abuse, opprombium) is born
    Nemesis and punishment follows.

    Εχε υπομονη Ηρωα
    Η τιμωρια δεν αργει.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yetos View Post
    makaronia fits with every cheese due to salt,

    just straight makaronia, with no sauce

    I think the best cheese is ladotyria Λαδοτυρια
    hard cheese stored olive oil with herbs
    a fantastic cheese for makaronia

    secondary is the Kefalograviera a Hybrid of Kefali (pressed) and graviera (gruyere) made in N Greece, Thessaly and Makedonia

    Graviera (gruyere) which is mostly produced in S Greece

    Kefali kefalotyri is typical all Greece but mainly in North
    it is very old and the older the harder and best for makaroni
    and the younger the smoother best for barbeque
    it is comparable simmilar to Parmigiano-Reggiano
    All women in my family know to produce such cheese,
    and sometimes i make my shelf, as hobby
    easy to make the first act,
    difficult to make it 'mature'
    I Like 6 months old
    Fair enough but Graviera is not only made in North Greece
    but also in Crete and Islands.

    Also it is a distinct Greek type of cheese and different in taste from Gruyere.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cybernautic View Post
    Fair enough but Graviera is not only made in North Greece
    but also in Crete and Islands.

    Also it is a distinct Greek type of cheese and different in taste from Gruyere.
    read what I wrote

    graviera is a ΠΟΠ of Agrafa Crete and Aegean islands

    i write S Greece

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    There are so many great cheeses, French and Spanish as well as Italian. I love manchego, for example. I can sometimes also get Mahon. A lot of Spanish cheeses are not available, however.

    The French ones are wonderful too and much more available. This is just a small number of them:



    Why would anyone eat "American" cheese? It's not even real cheese. For grilled cheese sandwiches I use mozzarella or a mild Cheddar, or muenster.

    My absolute favorite is the Neapolitan "Mozzarella in carozza". If you haven't tried it you should; you may never go back to regular grilled cheese sandwiches. :)

    This is the way I was taught to do it by my husband's Neapolitan grandmother. I think it's about as traditional as you can get. I've only made a few changes. I hate pancarre or "American" bread, so I use thinly sliced ciabatta bread or even Tuscan bread and just cut off the crusts. I also don't deep fry it. It uses up so much oil and makes a mess. Also, instead of putting one anchovy fillet, I just put a little smear of anchovy paste. Americans are too afraid of anchovies. If you put a little bit people won't even know it's there, they'll just know it's delicious! :)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1THEd1GcGs
    Ohh now that looks so yummy I wish I lived near a Neapolitan restaurant I really give it a try. Spanish cheese is ok but not the best (but Manchego is great with jamon and local bread) . French cheese can be smelly but works really well with bread or a salad. Anchovies can work if don't add too much taste to it. In Malta Mozzarella is common!

    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Why would anyone eat "American" cheese? It's not even real cheese. For grilled cheese sandwiches I use mozzarella or a mild Cheddar, or muenster.
    Now that's a great quote. British cheese such as Blue cheese, Cheddar and Stilton cheese works well with bread but sadly not pasta.

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    AdeoF, you should try cheddar on pasta, that's classic Mac n cheese right there
    mmmmmmmmm dooouuughhhnuuuutz

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by davef View Post
    AdeoF, you should try cheddar on pasta, that's classic Mac n cheese right there
    Hmm if it's grated and melted into the pasta with some tomato sauce then it can maybe work but maybe not. to be honest i like spaghetti bolognese. The beef works well with spaghetti and mixes well with cheddar.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Yes, I think a lot of Italians call it "gravy". Nonna Anna, my husband's grandmother, made it, and it was delicious. I would make it more often but for whatever reason my husband never liked it that much.

    I basically do this, as far as technique is concerned, except for the fact that I add tomato paste to the sauteed onions before adding the meat, and Nonna used just beef, sausage, and maybe spareribs, no ground beef, and once the sauce was almost done, would add fried meatballs that she had made separately. In the old, poorer days I think they used really cheap cuts of meat, like neck and shoulder bones. If I see them in the market I still throw them in: the tastiest meat is near the bone. I sometimes substitute beef short ribs for the chuck too, and put in some veal chunks. I'm trying to approximate the taste of manzo by combining the beef and veal.

    This girl gives me hope for young Italian women: she's really good. :)

    Here's what we had this afternoon:





    And a little something for afterwards, which was really quite good :)


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    Nothing wrong with that lunch jovialis!

    And in response to Angela's post, i just looked up American cheese, and I always felt it was the kraft version that was fake but apparently American cheese is classified as "processed" cheese...

    Its not the best cheese, too salty and I read horror stories of "pizzerias" putting American cheese on pizza.....I swear I'll be sick after seeing that.

    Worse, there are places that use kectchup and American cheese in place of tomato sauce and mozzarella..

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    Also, I think ricotta needs to be among the choices :)! I swear, give me a spoon and a big bowl of that stuff, and I'll be in heaven !!

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jovialis View Post
    Here's what we had this afternoon:





    And a little something for afterwards, which was really quite good :)

    Now that's what I call a great looking lunch!

    It's too funny...I think I have the same cabinets. It even looks like you have a dark green granite counter top!

    If the cook permits it, I'd love the recipe. :)

    If you're still drinking amaro you're not far from your roots. :)

    @Davef,

    I love ricotta too, especially from our local cheese maker so it's nice and creamy. I like it mixed with tomato sauce in a pasta dish, but I absolutely also adore it mixed with a littlehoney or sugar and lots of fresh, sweet fruit in the summer.


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    Jovialis, you spent 28.99 on that puny thing?? It had better be worth it! Besides, that's the weirdest looking Corona beer/Smirnoff vodka bottle I've ever seen! Wait a minute, that's one a dem wahn bawtles .

    Lol kidding aside (just messing with you, Jovialis), beer also goes great with Italian food, but this is based on my own personal experience with having beer with pizza. I recommend Corona, you'll thank me later !

    Angela, wow, I never knew you could combine ricotta with fruit, I should try that though I'm not a fruit person. I don't have much of a taste for fruits and veggies, but I think I should get one for the sake of eating healthier. I'm big into pasta, cheese, and tender meats (flank beef cuts are what dentists should make their patients eat to extract teeth :) , I swear you need teeth like a lion to bite into those boulders).

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    I love all kind of cheese, but on my pasta I still prefer parmesan, just gives it that "pasta" taste.

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    apart from parmesan, which is the best, I prefer ementaler

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    I love all cheese but tend to top almost all pastas with Parmesan. I am a big fan of Greek style “spaghetti” with Romano and butter

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    The truth is that I and my father love pasta, but not my mother too much. The pasta arrived in Spain quite late, at least to the tables of the popular homes, as much as the noodles in the soup existed. Macaroni or spaghetti with tomato almost once a week, almost always without cheese, but when I use cheese is cured cheese or also called manchego cheese.

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    Only parmesan!
    #onelove

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Efrain Garve View Post
    Only parmesan!
    #onelove
    With a lot of pasta dishes I agree, but a good number of Italian pasta dishes, especially from the south, used percorino romano, which has more "bite" or sharpness. It's perfect for some pasta dishes.

    Where I was born we're not far from where Parmigiano Reggiano is made so we use a lot of it, but we also have very good Tuscan percorino cheese. For fillings and things like that we mix the two. It gives the filling more "taste" or punch. When I make my Neapolitan grandmother in laws Sunday sauce we always used grated pecorino. That was how it was originally made in Italy and I still think it tastes the best.

    Just whatever you do don't buy grated cheese in a bottle or can. Buy a piece and freshly grate it; it makes a world of difference to the result.

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    Emmental or gruyre, because that's how most people have their pasta in France and I've grown up that way - though now I mostly use grated goat cheese. And always raw, please! Pasteurized cheese is no cheese at all.I like parmesan, I just don't think of using it. I love gorgonzola and mascarpone, as well as the mixture of both - I think it's called gorgonzola e mascarpone in Italy. In France we call it "magor".

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    Quote Originally Posted by TardisBlue View Post
    Emmental or gruy�re, because that's how most people have their pasta in France and I've grown up that way - though now I mostly use grated goat cheese. And always raw, please! Pasteurized cheese is no cheese at all.I like parmesan, I just don't think of using it. I love gorgonzola and mascarpone, as well as the mixture of both - I think it's called gorgonzola e mascarpone in Italy. In France we call it "magor".
    Emmental or gruyere mixed with tomato sauce and put on pasta? Really? They don't really think that's Italian pasta do they?

    Sorry. I don't want to sound rude, but I can't even imagine it. Not that I don't like both cheeses, because I do.

    Anyway, if anyone wants to know how to make Southern Italian pasta dishes, or any Southern Italian dishes, for that matter, you can go to youtube and look up "Laura in the Kitchen-Italian recipes". They're basic, not necessarily exactly how I make even the southern ones, but they're good, especially for people who aren't used to cooking "Italian". She also has recipes for lots of "American" food. Lovely young woman; she gives me hope for the future. :)
    https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...talian+recipes

    Another one is this sweet old Italian-American grandmother whose son in law videos her making Southern Italian-American classics. She's adorable.

    Here, for example, she shows how to make baked ziti, or pasta al forno in Italian. It's approximately my Neapolitan grandmother in laws recipe except she never put peas or hard boiled eggs and neither do I. Baked peas have no taste and I see no point in mucking it up with hard boiled eggs. The recipe amounts are below the video.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AnyNZM1X73w

    Be advised she has "Americanized" some recipes. There is absolutely no "Fettuccini Alfredo" like that in Italy where you dump in cream.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Emmental or gruyere mixed with tomato sauce and put on pasta? Really? They don't really think that's Italian pasta do they?

    Sorry. I don't want to sound rude, but I can't even imagine it. Not that I don't like both cheeses, because I do.
    I can imagine it very well It's a regular, popular dish in France, it's not haute cuisine and it doesn't claim to be Italian, or maybe just remotely. It's just the stuff you cook for a quick meal when you don't have much time. Kids love it. No we don't call that Italian pasta, just ptes au fromage/gruyre (with or without tomato sauce, and often with butter), or gratin de macaroni.

    NB: The Gratin de macaroni is a bit more elaborate - it's a proper recipe in France, made with cream, gruyre or emmental, olive oil, a bit of garlic and a pinch of nutmeg. Very nice!


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