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View Poll Results: What kind of cheese do you like to put on your pasta ?

Voters
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  • Grated parmesan

    24 64.86%
  • Cut/sliced pieces of parmesan in block

    5 13.51%
  • Grated Emmental or Gruyere

    5 13.51%
  • Grated mozzarella

    4 10.81%
  • Other kind of cheese

    6 16.22%
  • I don't put cheese on my pasta (or don't eat pasta)

    5 13.51%
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Thread: What kind of cheese do you like to put on your pasta ?

  1. #51
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    2 members found this post helpful.


    Home made pasta with fresh tomato sauce and Pecorino, Primitivo del Salento, and Pizzo (Bread baked with black olives, onion and tomato) 👍










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    Quote Originally Posted by TardisBlue View Post
    I can imagine it very well It's a regular, popular dish in France, it's not haute cuisine and it doesn't claim to be Italian, or maybe just remotely. It's just the stuff you cook for a quick meal when you don't have much time. Kids love it. No we don't call that Italian pasta, just p�tes au fromage/gruy�re (with or without tomato sauce, and often with butter), or gratin de macaroni.

    NB: The Gratin de macaroni is a bit more elaborate - it's a proper recipe in France, made with cream, gruy�re or emmental, olive oil, a bit of garlic and a pinch of nutmeg. Very nice!

    Now, I get it. :) Yummy.

    That gratin de macaroni looks absolutely delicious. We add nutmeg to creamy, cheesy sauces too. I'm going to look for a recipe.


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    2 members found this post helpful.
    Here's the translation of a recipe I found online (automatic translator). There are probably variations:

    250 g macaroni
    150 g Gruyre or Emmental cheese
    40 cl of liquid cream (preferably heavy cream)
    2 cloves of garlic
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg
    Salt, pepper


    Boil a large pot of salted water. Plunge the macaroni in it. Mix well and, when boiling again, cook for the time indicated on the pasta package. In the meantime....


    Preparation of the scented cream: peel the garlic cloves and squeeze them (using a garlic press or chop them finely). In a skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil over medium heat. When hot, add garlic and saut while stirring for 1 to 2 minutes. The garlic must not be coloured. Add the cream, nutmeg, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and remove from heat. Add 2/3 of the grated cheese and let it melt, while stirring.


    Once the macaroni are "al dente", drain them. Pour the macaroni into the garlic and Gruyre cream. Mix well and let cool for about half an hour (the pasta will absorb the sauce) or cover the dish with cling film before continuing the recipe.


    To finish up…


    Before tasting.... When the sauce is well absorbed, preheat the oven to 240C (thermostat 8) for at least 10 minutes. Butter a large gratin dish and pour the pasta and sauce into it. Cover with the remaining grated cheese and bake for 5 minutes.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by TardisBlue View Post
    Here's the translation of a recipe I found online (automatic translator). There are probably variations:

    250 g macaroni
    150 g Gruy�re or Emmental cheese
    40 cl of liquid cream (preferably heavy cream)
    2 cloves of garlic
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg
    Salt, pepper


    Boil a large pot of salted water. Plunge the macaroni in it. Mix well and, when boiling again, cook for the time indicated on the pasta package. In the meantime....


    Preparation of the scented cream: peel the garlic cloves and squeeze them (using a garlic press or chop them finely). In a skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil over medium heat. When hot, add garlic and saut� while stirring for 1 to 2 minutes. The garlic must not be coloured. Add the cream, nutmeg, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and remove from heat. Add 2/3 of the grated cheese and let it melt, while stirring.


    Once the macaroni are "al dente", drain them. Pour the macaroni into the garlic and Gruy�re cream. Mix well and let cool for about half an hour (the pasta will absorb the sauce) or cover the dish with cling film before continuing the recipe.


    To finish up…


    Before tasting.... When the sauce is well absorbed, preheat the oven to 240�C (thermostat 8) for at least 10 minutes. Butter a large gratin dish and pour the pasta and sauce into it. Cover with the remaining grated cheese and bake for 5 minutes.
    Thanks, Tardis! I'm definitely making this. :)

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    Generally the “Base Sauce” of all Gratinati is Beciamella (NO Cream), I Think.

    If you bake use beciamella, if not (stove top) use cream.

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salento View Post
    Generally the “Base Sauce” of all Gratinati is Beciamella (NO Cream), I Think.

    If you bake use beciamella, if not (stove top) use cream.
    That's the Italian take on it.

    My father's mother (Emilian from the Apennines) made a lot of "stove top" cream sauces. Of course, there were more cows than people there. :) I'm not really crazy about most of them because they're usually quite bland. I do like tagliolini con crema di tartufo, or even just wild mushrooms.

    I'm not a fan at all of the far northern Italian cream sauces with ham and peas and things like that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    That's the Italian take on it.

    My father's mother (Emilian from the Apennines) made a lot of "stove top" cream sauces. Of course, there were more cows than people there. :) I'm not really crazy about most of them because they're usually quite bland. I do like tagliolini con crema di tartufo, or even just wild mushrooms.

    I'm not a fan at all of the far northern Italian cream sauces with ham and peas and things like that.
    I saw a Chef making Pappardelle with a mix-mushrooms sauce with cream for a wedding, he cooked the Sauce at very low heat for hours (huge pot and never ending stirring). It was very good :)

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    3 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salento View Post
    I saw a Chef making Pappardelle with a mix-mushrooms sauce with cream for a wedding, he cooked the Sauce at very low heat for hours (huge pot and never ending stirring). It was very good :)

    This is the way we make it. We put it on gnocchi, and, of course, polenta! :)


    I never order something like this in restaurants here in America, not even Italian ones. They never got the concept that "sauce", of whatever kind, is supposed to "dress" pasta, not drown it.


    It's not that I don't like "white" pastas, because I do. I love them.

    Salsa di noci:

    Ravioli with butter and sage:


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    Parmesan. Sheep cheese is good aswell. Mozzarella would be the best but lactose intollerance makes it too painful.

  10. #60
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    3 members found this post helpful.
    Beyond individual taste, much depends on the type of recipe and how much you want to be faithful to traditions. In my home, for recipes with puff pastry, tagliatelle, cappelletti or passatelli in broth and obviously for risottos, Parmesan (or Grana Padano in second choice) is a must.
    For other recipes, however, Parmesan or Grana may not be suitable (or not sufficient on their own). For example, the "pizzoccheri" of Valtellina, which are a specialty from northern Lombardy (boiled buckwheat scraps, then cooked and seasoned with garlic, butter, cabbage and potatoes) require a creaming with Parmesan cheese but mostly from Casera, a semi-fat cheese typical of the valley, semi-cooked and semi-hard, of cow's milk. (It is also used for the "sciatt" dough, precisely small balls of Casera cheese battered with 00 flour and again with buckwheat, then fried in a pan.)
    If you cross the northern Apennines, as you go through central Italy, especially in the interior of Tuscany, Marche, Umbria and Lazio, Grana and Parmigiano progressively give way to Pecorino cheese (of which there are a thousand variations, more or less seasoned, more or less tasty and spicy) which is actually required to cook decently pasta recipes like Carbonara, Gricia, Amatriciana.
    There are also first courses that may require less obvious combinations, but very successful. The so-called "smoke and champagne" risotto was conceived probably about 50 years ago in Milan by chef Pino Capogna and was made known to the public by Ugo Tognazzi in his famous book. It combines northern and southern culinary traditions: in fact it's a parmesan risotto, simmered with champagne (or more modest sparkling wine / brut), in whose creaming, in addition to the Parmesan cheese, there must be some diced smoked Provola, a small milk cheese vaccine, of spun paste exposed to the smoke of straw, which is a dairy specialty originating from Campania :)

  11. #61
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    2 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Stuvanè View Post
    Beyond individual taste, much depends on the type of recipe and how much you want to be faithful to traditions. In my home, for recipes with puff pastry, tagliatelle, cappelletti or passatelli in broth and obviously for risottos, Parmesan (or Grana Padano in second choice) is a must.
    For other recipes, however, Parmesan or Grana may not be suitable (or not sufficient on their own). For example, the "pizzoccheri" of Valtellina, which are a specialty from northern Lombardy (boiled buckwheat scraps, then cooked and seasoned with garlic, butter, cabbage and potatoes) require a creaming with Parmesan cheese but mostly from Casera, a semi-fat cheese typical of the valley, semi-cooked and semi-hard, of cow's milk. (It is also used for the "sciatt" dough, precisely small balls of Casera cheese battered with 00 flour and again with buckwheat, then fried in a pan.)
    If you cross the northern Apennines, as you go through central Italy, especially in the interior of Tuscany, Marche, Umbria and Lazio, Grana and Parmigiano progressively give way to Pecorino cheese (of which there are a thousand variations, more or less seasoned, more or less tasty and spicy) which is actually required to cook decently pasta recipes like Carbonara, Gricia, Amatriciana.
    There are also first courses that may require less obvious combinations, but very successful. The so-called "smoke and champagne" risotto was conceived probably about 50 years ago in Milan by chef Pino Capogna and was made known to the public by Ugo Tognazzi in his famous book. It combines northern and southern culinary traditions: in fact it's a parmesan risotto, simmered with champagne (or more modest sparkling wine / brut), in whose creaming, in addition to the Parmesan cheese, there must be some diced smoked Provola, a small milk cheese vaccine, of spun paste exposed to the smoke of straw, which is a dairy specialty originating from Campania :)
    That's a great explanation so that people understand that Italian cooking is not about just one cheese.

    As I said above, probably partly because the Lunigiana is suspended between Emilia and Toscana, for things like fillings for pasta or stuffed veal breast, even stuffed mushrooms, my mother always mixed Parmigiano and our own Pecorino. I do think it also had to do with her sense of taste, as she thought it just tasted better, as do I. On the pasta itself, though, it was always grated Parmigiano.

    I'm also one of those people who love recipes like Carbonara, Gricia and Amatriciana, and I think they'd be spoiled if you didn't use Pecorino. Also, one of my favorites is cacio e pepe...such a deceptively simple recipe but so difficult to do correctly...absolutely no cream, yet look how creamy and silky.



    Maybe you have to grow up with more strongly flavored cheeses to appreciate them. I've heard Americans call some French and Italian cheeses "stinky", or Pecorino "funky". I call them delicious. :)

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