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View Poll Results: Do you feel affinity with your Greco-Roman cultural heritage as a Westerner ?

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  • Yes, very much => I am European, from a former part of the Roman Empire

    21 52.50%
  • Yes, very much => I am European, from outside of the Roman Empire

    4 10.00%
  • Yes, very much => I am non European but from European descent

    3 7.50%
  • Yes, a little => I am European, from a former part of the Roman Empire

    2 5.00%
  • Yes, a little => I am European, from outside of the Roman Empire

    1 2.50%
  • Yes, a little => I am non European but from European descent

    4 10.00%
  • Not at all => I am European, from a former part of the Roman Empire

    1 2.50%
  • Not at all => I am European, from outside of the Roman Empire

    2 5.00%
  • Not at all => I am European, from a former part of the Roman Empire

    0 0%
  • I am not of European descent

    2 5.00%
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Thread: Do you feel some affinity for the Greco-Roman culture ?

  1. #26
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    The Apaches are formidable Warriors. (Respect)



    .....The Apache: group of culturally related Native American tribes in the Southwestern United States, which include the Chiricahua, Jicarilla, Lipan, Mescalero, Salinero, Plains and Western Apache. Distant cousins of the Apache are the Navajo, with which they share the Southern Athabaskan languages. There are Apache communities in Oklahoma, Texas, and reservations in Arizona and New Mexico. Apache people have moved throughout the United States and elsewhere, including urban centers. The Apache Nations are politically autonomous, speak several different languages and have distinct cultures....
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apache


    Geronimo: (Mescalero-Chiricahua: Goyaałé [kòjàːɬɛ́] "the one who yawns"; was a prominent leader and medicine man from the Bedonkohe band of the Apache tribe.




    Cochise: ch'ish "oak" Principal chief (or nantan) of the Chokonen band of the Chiricahua Apache.
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    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.

    Do you feel some affinity for the Greco-Roman culture ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Salento View Post
    The Apaches are formidable Warriors. (Respect)



    .....The Apache: group of culturally related Native American tribes in the Southwestern United States, which include the Chiricahua, Jicarilla, Lipan, Mescalero, Salinero, Plains and Western Apache. Distant cousins of the Apache are the Navajo, with which they share the Southern Athabaskan languages. There are Apache communities in Oklahoma, Texas, and reservations in Arizona and New Mexico. Apache people have moved throughout the United States and elsewhere, including urban centers. The Apache Nations are politically autonomous, speak several different languages and have distinct cultures....
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apache


    Geronimo: (Mescalero-Chiricahua: Goyaałé [kòjàːɬɛ́] "the one who yawns"; was a prominent leader and medicine man from the Bedonkohe band of the Apache tribe.




    Cochise: ch'ish "oak" Principal chief (or nantan) of the Chokonen band of the Chiricahua Apache.

    Wolf of the Sacred Snow:
    High Cheekbones Cherokee



    lol

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    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    My answer is: A little bit of affinity, non-European but of European descent.

    Of course many of the Greek and Roman influences became pretty widespread, such as the alphabet, calendar, using a fork, etc. thus any westerner would probably take all of such things for granted and feel an affinity. But there are others, that maybe not are so entrenched.

    I don't feel much of an affinity for eating meals in a succession of courses. My family and many of those I know eat with all of the food out on the table at once, including cakes. In my German extended family this has always been the way. Interestingly, my English in-laws stand on ceremony with courses for the most rudimentary of meal. It seems this Roman tradition influenced them more deeply. Scratching my head. I have been to only one Italian Wedding in my life and let me tell you, before it was close to halfway through the million courses meal, I was beyond done with it.

    I don't feel an affinity for stadiums or amphitheatres. In fact, I dislike them and if going to see theatre or live music prefer only small venues.

    I don't feel an affinity for public baths. I do however, feel a big affinity for private saunas.

    I do feel an affinity for festival days, but this does and doesn't derive from Rome. It goes back to pre-Christian times and related to nature, but has had an obvious Catholic overlay that was put on it.

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    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    I have a lot of Southern European blood so I feel affinity bc of that
    mmmmmmmmm dooouuughhhnuuuutz

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    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salento View Post
    Wolf of the Sacred Snow:
    High Cheekbones Cherokee



    lol
    She should wear that around. It would be a show of respect for her "Cherokee" mother

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    Pocahontas - Little Wanton
    (playful one) ;)
    in European attire - National Portrait Gallery

    An error in transcription misidentifies her husband as Thomas, the name given to their son.



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    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Guys, the topic is not Elizabeth Warren or Pocahontas.

    As to the "topic", I don't even know what feeling an affinity for a certain culture would mean, when their culture has been dead and gone for coming on 2000 years.

    As for what they bequeathed the west, that's a different story.

    The entire article is worth reading because I get the feeling most people either weren't taught or have forgotten these things.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legacy...e_Roman_Empire

    One extremely important legacy is law, without which no society can survive. Legal codes based on Roman law are in blue.


    I don't get the thing about multi-courses. First of all, poorer people certainly didn't have multi-course meals anywhere, including Italy or ancient Rome.

    Also, multi-course meals meals are by no means only a "Latin" thing. I've been in England quite a bit, and there's usually a starter or appetizer, and then the main course unless people are dieting. It's usually a function of class and money also, of casualness, as well as calories, not southern Europe versus northern Europe.

    I've never seen a restaurant or been in a home where only soup is served, for example. You have your soup and then your meat dish, or in England you had a fish course and then the meat course etc.

    Of course, Italians, being Italian, are manic about it as they are about all matters relating to food, although much less so now. Also, in the past, most peasants were lucky to get some pasta with garlic and oil.

    Victorian England:
    "The Dinner Menu

    Victorian Dinners, in particular are quite well know for the endless procession of soups, meats, salads, pudding, ices, and meringues or pastries. It was not unusual for a Victorian Dinner menu to be nine courses, with plenty of time allowed between each course to permit each guest to fully enjoy the variety of courses. The following is a sample menu of a six course Victorian Dinner Party based on one designed in 1887 by Maria Parloa, founder of a cooking school. Miss Parola's original dinner recipes would have required a pound of butter, almost a dozen eggs and two quarts of cream.




    Non si fa il proprio dovere perchè qualcuno ci dica grazie, lo si fa per principio, per se stessi, per la propria dignità. Oriana Fallaci

  8. #33
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    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    imo I’m the end-product of Greco-Roman Culture.
    In my family they still swear to the old Pagan Gods like “Porco Giove” (technically it’s not a Sin).

  9. #34
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    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salento View Post
    imo I’m the end-product of Greco-Roman Culture.
    In my family they still swear to the old Pagan Gods like “Porco Giove” (technically it’s not a Sin).
    There is also another version:


    17 Dec.
    Paget to the Council.
    Now the Council's letters seem to imply (words quoted) that the King will keep no strangers save the Albanoys.
    Cales, 17 Dec. 1545. Signed.
    O me zhabat në moçale, o me zhgabat lart në male!
    -Petro Nini Luarasi-

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    Quote Originally Posted by Salento View Post
    imo I’m the end-product of Greco-Roman Culture.
    In my family they still swear to the old Pagan Gods like “Porco Giove” (technically it’s not a Sin).
    Never bothered my father and uncles that it was a sin, but then they were raised in Alta Toscana, and the Tuscans, as I'm sure you know, are notorious for their foul mouths.

    It was one of his worst qualities. I absolutely hate Italian swearing; it's so much worse than Ango-Saxon swearing, imo, partly because it is so often a melding of the dirty with the sacred. Terrible.

    I'd like to see them enforce in Italy that new World Court pronouncement that you can't say terrible things about Mohammed, when you routinely hear such filth about God, Jesus, the saints, even Mary.

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    0 out of 2 members found this post helpful.
    The Greeks and Romans certainly laid a foundation, some of which was rediscovered after their downfall, but I consider myself a descendant of the Industrial Revolution and the Enlightenment. It's unfortunate that Christianity still held such a strong sway on these opinions, as individuals were truly held back from what they could have potentially accomplished, had they not been living in fear of being hung as heretics.

    For example, look at this great guy with some amazing vision. He even looks NW European (British or English) to me but is Portugese.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sebast...quis_of_Pombal

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    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron1981 View Post
    He even looks NW European (British or English) to me but is Portugese.
    And that's the most important thing.

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    2 out of 2 members found this post helpful.
    Every time I think someone is maybe not as bad as I thought....
    :)

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    Do you feel some affinity for the Greco-Roman culture ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Never bothered my father and uncles that it was a sin, but then they were raised in Alta Toscana, and the Tuscans, as I'm sure you know, are notorious for their foul mouths.

    It was one of his worst qualities. I absolutely hate Italian swearing; it's so much worse than Ango-Saxon swearing, imo, partly because it is so often a melding of the dirty with the sacred. Terrible.

    I'd like to see them enforce in Italy that new World Court pronouncement that you can't say terrible things about Mohammed, when you routinely hear such filth about God, Jesus, the saints, even Mary.
    In my Town People still say:
    è un Adone (handsome man)
    è una Venere (a beautiful Woman)

    è un Marc’Antonio (a strong and attractive man, “A Real Man”) Salento

    è un Bruto (a Violent, unmannered, no to be trusted person)
    è una Tr... (you know ... ), maybe associated with Helen of Troy betraying her Husband.
    Abbracciato da Morfeo (deep sleep)
    Felice come Bacco (Happy and slightly drunk)

    è un Cicerone (Talking too much, posing as an expert on everything, force-enter into the merits of a topic even when clueless). Salento

    Tizio, Caio e Sempronio (Sarcastic way indicating inseparable friends always hangin' out together. Or hypothetical names, used to indicate any person taken for example)

    There are more phrases like that.

    Many hunters call their dogs Diana (Goddess of the hunt), the male dogs too, lol.
    Last edited by Salento; 31-10-18 at 17:02.

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    Do you feel some affinity for the Greco-Roman culture ?

    Outside of Europe, imo the City with the strongest Greco-Roman affinity is Washington DC.
    So many of the Buildings of Power, Monuments, and Memorials are a mix of Greco-Roman architecture, and some of these structures are massive.
    On the big dome of the Capitol Building (home of the United States Congress), there is a huge fresco: The Apotheosis of Washington (by a Greek-Italian artist Constantino Brumidi) depicting George Washington among some of the Pagan Gods, Roman icons, and other Founding fathers.
    One part of the message is striking clear to me: the Nation aspiration is to reach the greatness of classic Rome and Greece at their peak, and assuring liberty to the people.
    And written in Latin: “E Pluribus Unum” (out of many, one) is the motto of the USA






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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post

    As to the "topic", I don't even know what feeling an affinity for a certain culture would mean, when their culture has been dead and gone for coming on 2000 years.
    As for what they bequeathed the west, that's a different story.

    The entire article is worth reading because I get the feeling most people either weren't taught or have forgotten these things.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legacy...e_Roman_Empire

    One extremely important legacy is law, without which no society can survive. Legal codes based on Roman law are in blue.
    Is this a Napolean was Italian, not French claim? Most of us here (excluding the Islamics) , owe our laws to Napolean. I believe we were all taught this. To me, Civil law is French, but I am no expert.





    [/QUOTE]

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post

    I don't get the thing about multi-courses.
    Neither do I, but I would like to know how and secondarily where, since it probably was anywhere the leisured classes could eat this way and thus, not started solely in Rome. It does seem kind of a no-brainer that eating dinner as if in a 3 act play (or more) is a sign of class distinction.

    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post

    First of all, poorer people certainly didn't have multi-course meals anywhere, including Italy or ancient Rome.

    Also, multi-course meals meals are by no means only a "Latin" thing. I've been in England quite a bit, and there's usually a starter or appetizer, and then the main course unless people are dieting. It's usually a function of class and money also, of casualness, as well as calories, not southern Europe versus northern Europe.

    I've never seen a restaurant or been in a home where only soup is served, for example. You have your soup and then your meat dish, or in England you had a fish course and then the meat course etc.

    Of course, Italians, being Italian, are manic about it as they are about all matters relating to food, although much less so now. Also, in the past, most peasants were lucky to get some pasta with garlic and oil.

    Victorian England:
    "The Dinner Menu

    Victorian Dinners, in particular are quite well know for the endless procession of soups, meats, salads, pudding, ices, and meringues or pastries. It was not unusual for a Victorian Dinner menu to be nine courses, with plenty of time allowed between each course to permit each guest to fully enjoy the variety of courses. The following is a sample menu of a six course Victorian Dinner Party based on one designed in 1887 by Maria Parloa, founder of a cooking school. Miss Parola's original dinner recipes would have required a pound of butter, almost a dozen eggs and two quarts of cream.


    I wonder if the higher class eating in courses at home was passed from the hierarchy of Roman and/or other Royal families of Europe such as France , influence to Great Britain.

    Restaurants are a modern age invention, stemming from bourgeoise society and thus imitating the higher classes until of course recently. So, it makes sense that the drawn out eating style would be taken up by the aspiring class.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Strudel View Post
    Neither do I, but I would like to know how and secondarily where, since it probably was anywhere the leisured classes could eat this way and thus, not started solely in Rome. It does seem kind of a no-brainer that eating dinner as if in a 3 act play (or more) is a sign of class distinction.

    I wonder if the higher class eating in courses at home was passed from the hierarchy of Roman and/or other Royal families of Europe such as France , influence to Great Britain.

    Restaurants are a modern age invention, stemming from bourgeoise society and thus imitating the higher classes until of course recently. So, it makes sense that the drawn out eating style would be taken up by the aspiring class.
    It also has a bit to do with the importance you place on the quality of your food. Most foods should be eaten hot for maximum flavor. I routinely send soup back in a restaurant if it's been sitting in the kitchen and has cooled off. The same goes for most meats, mashed potatoes, and on and on. If you slop it all on the table at once, you're going to have to choose: tepid soup or congealed, disgusting mashed potatoes and dried out meat.

    As to Italian eating habits in particular, that is part of what informs the insistence still of many Italians on eating the soup or pasta or risotto first, so it doesn't get cold and also congeal in the case of the latter, thus ruining the taste and texture. If you're doing it alone at home it requires quite a bit of practice to get the timing right.

    There are lots of other Italian "eating" rules. Although they've evolved over thousands of years, most Italians treat them as if they were carved in stone and handed to us by God as he gave the Moses the law code for the Israelites. :) We're a conservative people in terms of culture and nowhere more conservative than in matters of food.

    Just as an example, many Italians are offended by the whole "spaghetti and meatballs" thing, which they think is a terrible "American" invention. Yet, in parts of Italy they do make meatballs in a tomato sauce, and then use the leftover tomato sauce to dress pasta. HOWEVER, the pasta still has to come out first, and the meatballs later. That, I think, is going too far. The meatballs are going to hit your stomach within minutes of the pasta.

    I could go on and on. The way my older relatives react when I offer them iced drinks during a meal you would think they were vampires and I was waving garlic at them. What, am I crazy? Do I want to ruin their digestion? It goes on and on: no milk drinks with meals, no dairy with fish or seafood, do not overload your stomach with proteins and fats at breakfast, etc. etc.

    The only people I've ever met who are as obsessed about food are the French. As a university student, my cousin and I checked into a pension in France for a week to use as a base. As we sat to table, we saw the owner going to each table to have a serious discussion about the menu for the evening, and "precisely" how it was prepared. I knew I was "home" in a sense. :)

    I'm only seeing the cracks in the last few decades. With more women working outside the home, getting together one course for dinner is about all they can handle. I'm more old fashioned. I would still always serve the risotto, soup, or pasta first, for example, and only then the meat and vegetables. They'd better eat it at its best while it's still hot or I'll smack them. :) The meat should usually sit for a few minutes anyway, so the juices can re-distribute, and thanks to microwaves, I can reheat the vegetables if necessary.

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