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Thread: What do you like and dislike about each language ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Canek View Post
    that's probably the main reason, it's totally understatable, you are more near to spain.

    but people who knows the spanish accent, and most of the latin american accents, usually preffers the latin americans'.
    Eheh a Spanish girl washed my brain in the past.

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    False. Latin americans tend to hate european spanish. Don´t generalize. That´s just your opinion sirius/canek/baldo. Obviously you don´t know that your favourite Peruvian spanish is pretty similar to our spanish.

    I like the French (in girls) and celtic languages.

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    Many people I know who are familiar with various Spanish accents prefer Castilian Spanish. Most seem to consider Castilian to be clearer and easier to understand. The closest thing I have heard to Castilian in LatAm is Columbian style Spanish.

    Language is language. You're going to like some and dislike others.

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    NO single language is without variants in their own countries.

    Spain has many variants of Spanish, depending on region.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_Spain


    The Spanish spoken in the Americas has many indigeous words incorporated into it.
    There is nothing "inherently" wrong with it.

    There is no PURE language.

    English even in England has it's variants in accents and dialects depending on location of the individuals.

    ALL languages are influenced by: Level education of the individual(s), social status familial background, etc . The more educated a person is the more "likely" that that persons speaks their language closer to the "modal of that language (of their own country) . One's occupation also influences language. A farmer, sheep herder, coal miner, etc will have a different daily vocabulary of a given language than that of an office worker, artist, etc.

    What I like about Spanish, French , Italian , Portuguese, and English, all of its variants are beautiful and pleasant to the "ear". What I don't like about them is that I can't master them. By the way I've been to Portugual, and Brazil and the Portuguese in Brazil is very "melodious" vs. the more "gutteral" mainland Portguese (to my ears).

    All languages evolve and incorporate existing lexicons in their own languages. The computer age is a good examle, we are using words and phrases that did not exist bc (before computers).

    To "lump" any given language as the "measuring rod" of an entire countries language and of any other country that speaks that language is simply not a fact.

    I've been to Paris and have heard variants of French there, and I've been to Southwestern France, and the accent and dialects are also different than the French spoken in Paris (most of the small towns in Southwesten France, speak in a rather straight foward way.

    Not all small towners speak country talk, it all depends on their education status as mentioned above.

    All language is about communication, if one understands what is being communicated then that is all that matters in everyday "chatter".

    Why find fault with its delivery?

    Melusine

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    Quote Originally Posted by Melusine View Post
    NO single language is without variants in their own countries.

    Spain has many variants of Spanish, depending on region.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_Spain
    Actually these are not variants of spanish, but different languages. I am myself a native speaker of Catalan.

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    The limit where to define a dialect or a language is often very fluid and socially constructed. For instance, when I listen to Swiss German I understand as much as when I listen to Dutch. Although Swiss German is considered a German dialect, while Dutch is considered a distinct western Germanic language. In fact, "High German" as it is widely spoken today in Germany, linguisticaly lies between the Alemanic (e.g. Swiss Dutch) and Netherlandic (e.g. Dutch) branch. However, Swiss Germans are also considered as ethnic Germans, while the Dutch are Dutch. So in the end the limit between dialect and language is about politics.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mzungu mchagga View Post
    The limit where to define a dialect or a language is often very fluid and socially constructed. For instance, when I listen to Swiss German I understand as much as when I listen to Dutch. Although Swiss German is considered a German dialect, while Dutch is considered a distinct western Germanic language. In fact, "High German" as it is widely spoken today in Germany, linguisticaly lies between the Alemanic (e.g. Swiss Dutch) and Netherlandic (e.g. Dutch) branch. However, Swiss Germans are also considered as ethnic Germans, while the Dutch are Dutch. So in the end the limit between dialect and language is about politics.
    I agree! Even dialects have their gramatical structure..I would add that maybe a language it's just the amount of the dialects that share the same gramatical structure?
    I'm quite ignorant in this subject so don't blame me if I'm wrong!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Riccardo View Post
    I agree! Even dialects have their gramatical structure..I would add that maybe a language it's just the amount of the dialects that share the same gramatical structure?
    I'm quite ignorant in this subject so don't blame me if I'm wrong!
    Mmh, I think there is no ultimate rule. It seems to be really a matter of acceptance by the people whether a dialect is still considered a dialect or already different language.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mzungu mchagga View Post
    Mmh, I think there is no ultimate rule. It seems to be really a matter of acceptance by the people whether a dialect is still considered a dialect or already different language.
    In the time it became as you said!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cambria Red View Post
    Many people I know who are familiar with various Spanish accents prefer Castilian Spanish. Most seem to consider Castilian to be clearer and easier to understand. The closest thing I have heard to Castilian in LatAm is Columbian style Spanish.

    Language is language. You're going to like some and dislike others.
    probably beacuse they live near to spain, and are more used to the spanish accent... but people not related to spain or latin america usually prefers some latin american accents like colombian or peruvian..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mzungu mchagga View Post
    The limit where to define a dialect or a language is often very fluid and socially constructed. For instance, when I listen to Swiss German I understand as much as when I listen to Dutch. Although Swiss German is considered a German dialect, while Dutch is considered a distinct western Germanic language. In fact, "High German" as it is widely spoken today in Germany, linguisticaly lies between the Alemanic (e.g. Swiss Dutch) and Netherlandic (e.g. Dutch) branch. However, Swiss Germans are also considered as ethnic Germans, while the Dutch are Dutch. So in the end the limit between dialect and language is about politics.
    Well, The Dutch are surely related to Rheinland people. Or you could better say Rheinland is Dutch. Köln is very Dutch.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Reinaert View Post
    Well, The Dutch are surely related to Rheinland people. Or you could better say Rheinland is Dutch. Köln is very Dutch.
    Here is a good map of dialects of West Germanic languages around Germany, the Netherlands, and Switzerland. There is some spillover of Dutch into the area just north of Köln.

    For what it's worth, my German-speaking ancestors would have spoken Alemannic & Franconian dialects. I actually find that I like the sound of those dialects rather well, better than standard German, or Saxon dialects, which I have also heard. Probably just bias from me, though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sparkey View Post
    Here is a good map of dialects of West Germanic languages around Germany, the Netherlands, and Switzerland. There is some spillover of Dutch into the area just north of Köln.

    For what it's worth, my German-speaking ancestors would have spoken Alemannic & Franconian dialects. I actually find that I like the sound of those dialects rather well, better than standard German, or Saxon dialects, which I have also heard. Probably just bias from me, though.
    It's a good map.
    I am from the south of the Netherlands, and I can understand the language of the Ripuarian Franks in the Rheinland without a problem.
    The point is, my ancestors are partly Salian Franks or Salii.

    I am a Celt from my father's side, and a Franc from my mother's side.

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    Unfortunatly I speak standard German only, and I do feel a little ashamed about it

    I grew up in the area where Hessian dialect is spoken, which to some degree is often considerd as the "in-between-dialect" of everything. Even though I don't speak it by myself I do understand it very well and also have no trouble with understanding most of all other dialects.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mzungu mchagga View Post
    Unfortunatly I speak standard German only, and I do feel a little ashamed about it

    I grew up in the area where Hessian dialect is spoken, which to some degree is often considerd as the "in-between-dialect" of everything. Even though I don't speak it by myself I do understand it very well and also have no trouble with understanding most of all other dialects.
    I have taken a couple of classes where we were taught only standard German, but the place I think I'd most like to visit in the German-speaking world is Switzerland. How much would those classes actually help me?

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    Quote Originally Posted by sparkey View Post
    I have taken a couple of classes where we were taught only standard German, but the place I think I'd most like to visit in the German-speaking world is Switzerland. How much would those classes actually help me?
    That's no problem because everyone in Switzerland is able to speak standard German, and all the formal writing, also in shops, is in standard German, too. Only when they talk among themselves you probably won't understand a single word.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Canek View Post
    probably beacuse they live near to spain, and are more used to the spanish accent... but people not related to spain or latin america usually prefers some latin american accents like colombian or peruvian..
    Its your opinion, to me spain´s spanish retains a certain solemnity that latinamerican hasn´t, you can call it harsh or monotony, as i can call the "sweetness" of latinamerican spanish lack of consistency, all depends on your prejudices. I love the way of speaking of colombian or venezuelan women (and i´m a woman too) for exemple, but i think the spanish in Latin America lost masculinity, I don´t know why intonation in Spain is much more masculine, more grave, so, for a woman, ok, i´m with you, maybe l.A spanish, for a man 100% spanish from Spain (except cuban, more masculine than the rest of LA).

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    True, the American people mens speak Spanish as well, as very little women, very sweet, short, is a problem, because you never know what your mood. Why men speak our language as schoolgirls or sweet princesses?

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    to me cuban accent is the worst of spanish accents. but for the rest of latin americans, they are ahead of spain's accent... in male or in female.

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    I really don't like the way the French 'R' sounds when they sing, it makes the language sound really ugly - which it of course is not!

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    I quite like English. Without actually knowing, I would simply guess that English has the widest vocabulary in the world. My friends in Serbia also like English (just phonetically), particularly with the American accent. Personally I find the American accent the nicest and definitely clearest of the English accents. However I can not stand when Europeans have an American accent. All Europeans somehow sound better with an English accent. The most disgusting language for me is Arabic, followed very closely by German. My God, German is just horrible. It sounds almost evil at times. I'm sure that Satan would be a German speaker.... Oh, and French is definitely the most beautiful sounding language overall. Most of the English world would definitely say that English spoken with a French accent is also the most beautiful. That language just sounds so beautiful. It's my dream to learn it. I also like Spanish but not Italian or Portuguese so much.

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    French - I can almost see why people think it's a 'beautiful' language but when it's sung, it sounds awful! It's something to do with that harsh 'R' sound and the way they pronounce their 'Es' it doesn't flow at all. Of course native French speakers won't notice this because they know the meaning behind the word. Just like I am sure English isn't everyones cup of tea in song but I personally think it sounds way better than any other language sung - apart from maybe Spanish, but Spanish just has this different quality.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brett142 View Post
    French - I can almost see why people think it's a 'beautiful' language but when it's sung, it sounds awful!
    I am a native French speaker and I wholeheartedly agree with you. As a teenager many French songs got on my nerves (here is one that I particularly hated). I felt almost like an allergic reaction. That's partly why I never turned on the radio and was happy to go live in non-Francophone countries for nearly a decade. I am not saying that French songs have the monopoly of mediocrity. For example Japanese (and most East Asian) songs generally suck, but they don't get on my nerves in the same way. German, Dutch or Scandinavian languages sound terrible too in pop music (although German can sound good in folk music), but isn't annoying like French can be (ok, Dutch can be pretty irritating as well).

    I think that English is the language that sounds best when sung, and it is surely when it is so popular, even among non-English speakers worldwide. Languages like Italian, Spanish, Russian and Hindi are also quite melodious. Hebrew and Arabic, which sound very harsh when spoken, can be quite nice when sung (especially by women).

    It's something to do with that harsh 'R' sound and the way they pronounce their 'Es' it doesn't flow at all.
    The harsh 'r' and other consonants would be why German doesn't sound good when sung. The reason I don't like sung French is that it often sounds too high-pitched, soft, whiny, lamenting all at the same time (like a capricious little girl). The few French singers that I can tolerate all have low-pitched and very masculine voices by French standards and interestingly are all from my parents or grandparents' generation (like Michel Sardou, Serge Lama or Charles Aznavour, or even Edith Piaf who is low-pitched for a woman). I can't think of any French-speaking singer under 50 years old that I like.
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    The reason I don't like sung French is that it often sounds too high-pitched, soft, whiny, lamenting all at the same time (like a capricious little girl).
    The few French singers that I can tolerate all have low-pitched and very masculine voices by French standards
    French standards?
    Which one?
    Polnareff?
    Cristophe?
    Patrique Juvet?
    They stopped to sing since 30 years and they was not a "standard"...

    like Michel Sardou, Serge Lama
    They are the worst singers, poor lyrics and poor music and sing for old women...

    I can't think of any French-speaking singer under 50 years old that I like.
    Maybe because they are the only french singers you know...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gavroche View Post
    They are the worst singers, poor lyrics and poor music
    I don't care much for music in general (except classical), much less for French songs... Songs lyrics are almost always stupid or shallow in any song. You can't convey anything deep or factual through a few sung words. You need to write a well researched book. In my eyes the most stupid and useless activity humans have ever created is poetry, which is completely devoid of hard facts. Songs come close to that.

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