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Thread: What characterises people with high IQ's ?

  1. #126
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    I believe the UK and Bulgaria have the highest rate of Mensa IQ test scores. If I remember correctly it (IQ) was associated with the mtDNA and not with the fathers yDNA. The most common mtDNA in both countries is H. Ireland is dominated by mtDNA H and it's a leader in Mensa scores in the UK. It also could be mtDNA U. I don't know how prevalent MENSA is in Asian countries so the results could be bias towards Europeans.

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    Maybe we could make a database of people who visit here, have their hg's tested, and are Mensa members.

    I'm a member. I don't care much about IQ, but it could be interesting to know.
    Paternally I'm E1b-V13 ( father from Montenegro ), and I haven't tested my mtDNA, but my mother is probably H ( her father was a Serb - Jewish mix, and mother was Serbian / Bulgarian )

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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperStalin View Post
    Maybe we could make a database of people who visit here, have their hg's tested, and are Mensa members.

    I'm a member. I don't care much about IQ, but it could be interesting to know.
    Paternally I'm E1b-V13 ( father from Montenegro ), and I haven't tested my mtDNA, but my mother is probably H ( her father was a Serb - Jewish mix, and mother was Serbian / Bulgarian )
    You are not going to achieve a valid statistics this way, because there is no known causation between IQ and paternal Y chromosome. If there is a week causation, that we don't know of, you would need thousands upon thousands of samples to start showing something. So most likely what you will receive is statistical correlation between most common haplogroup and highest number of smart people. For example, if you tested Spaniards you will learn that 70% of smartest people belong to R1b, same as percentage of R1b or entire Spanish population.
    Be wary of people who tend to glorify the past, underestimate the present, and demonize the future.

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    As I said, nothing too scientific, just for fun sake.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperStalin View Post
    As I said, nothing too scientific, just for fun sake.
    Sorry, I didn't know it would be fun for some people. ;)

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    It was like you were describing me. I have all of those character traits you mentioned. :)


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    Hi, I signed up to write a quick post. I'm not here to boast about my IQ, I just wanted to present you with something I've noticed over my time through school and college (I'm 18 from the UK).
    The OP pretty much hit the nail on the head with my personal traits, but there is one more thing that I've come to recognise about myself (I'm hoping someone shares this trait).
    In school, I find exams ridiculously easy compared to other students. I can usually pass exams with the top grade with very little effort; usually I'll just read through the textbook a few nights before an exam.
    Because of this, I went a few years feeling as if I must have some sort of superior memory and it wasn't just simply intelligence.

    Here is where it gets interesting I guess...
    I've noticed that I find it easy to remember something that I WANT to remember such as a fact/quote/stat.
    However, when it comes to other things, my memory is actually quite appalling. I forget little things on a daily basis and it's not the usual things that everyone forgets. Often, I will have situations where I will have something in my hand, and suddenly it has disappeared and I have no recollection of placing it anywhere. I forget events, I'm always late to classes and meetings and if I'm told to "remember to do ____" 9 times out of 10 I will completely forget they've told me anything.

    It's frustrating, I feel like I am the complete opposite of a 'normal' person when it comes to memory. Of course it's nice to be able to remember facts for exams and general knowledge but it's not very helpful in the real world where I'll need to be independent as I really can't rely on myself to do things.

    Just thought I'd share, it would be nice to know there are others in the same boat.

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    Exactly

    Quote Originally Posted by Goomyo View Post
    Hi, I signed up to write a quick post. I'm not here to boast about my IQ, I just wanted to present you with something I've noticed over my time through school and college (I'm 18 from the UK).
    The OP pretty much hit the nail on the head with my personal traits, but there is one more thing that I've come to recognise about myself (I'm hoping someone shares this trait).
    In school, I find exams ridiculously easy compared to other students. I can usually pass exams with the top grade with very little effort; usually I'll just read through the textbook a few nights before an exam.
    Because of this, I went a few years feeling as if I must have some sort of superior memory and it wasn't just simply intelligence.

    Here is where it gets interesting I guess...
    I've noticed that I find it easy to remember something that I WANT to remember such as a fact/quote/stat.
    However, when it comes to other things, my memory is actually quite appalling. I forget little things on a daily basis and it's not the usual things that everyone forgets. Often, I will have situations where I will have something in my hand, and suddenly it has disappeared and I have no recollection of placing it anywhere. I forget events, I'm always late to classes and meetings and if I'm told to "remember to do ____" 9 times out of 10 I will completely forget they've told me anything.

    It's frustrating, I feel like I am the complete opposite of a 'normal' person when it comes to memory. Of course it's nice to be able to remember facts for exams and general knowledge but it's not very helpful in the real world where I'll need to be independent as I really can't rely on myself to do things.

    Just thought I'd share, it would be nice to know there are others in the same boat.
    Same here XD.....just shows that ur mind is elsewhere, i can relate to all of the points mentioned in this post + i've been extraordinarily good at sports and atheletics(even the ones i try for the first time) actually most of the things\m/ (oh yeah i'm gonna brag xD, its not everywhere that u find people who can actually understand and comprehend what ur saying!! ryt?? :P xD....that is frailty of genius, it needs an audience.....and yeah, that is copied from the sherlock series....but it is the truth...at least until ur mature enough or maybe not....either way....i'm 21 which is not too old enough to be wise enough xD..atleast not for me haha...:P...)

    And as ‘is' said, i agree that its quite frustrating growing up among ‘others'(u know wat i mean :P)....like everyone else i had real tough times(mostly on psychological side and a lot bcuz of carelessness in my upbringing......real bad regrets(as they always are :/...) But one thing i've learned for sure is BE PATIENT (ppl with higher iq's definitely lack patience though its subjective......as in learning to suffer fools gladly). We ppl might not have problem solving a math or science quiz but being smart has its cons too(and they are severe).Like social withdrawal, being unattentive, fantasizing/daydreaming, being judgemental(not sure if that's a word XD), being nit-picky about every single detail and tons of other probs(almost all of em related to emotions and behaviour)

    But wen ur past these things,its just so amazing out there is not what i'm gonna say(too cheezy for me XD..). Still with every passing year i feel like i'm so much happier and wiser(or maybe i'm too high ryt now XD....just kidding i don't do drugs except for some cigerettes :P...)

    So obviously with all these extraordinary capabilities we feel obliged to work for the betterment of humanity :P...^_^……...haha

    OMG!! that wuz so abrupt and pointless !! o_O...XD....thanks for reading :P .....wish u guyz gud luck

  9. #134
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    As I was explained it was called having great focus skills. One is able to focus on something so as to forget all other unimportant things.
    I enjoy this as part of me, and I have wife at home and my team at work to deal with these shortcomings. I hope they get something in return, at least I try to make them happy...

    Man is not supposed to be a lonely animal. We are social, and we cooperate.

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    I also wonder on this one

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    HJow do you become a member?

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    What you mean?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ludvighoel View Post
    What you mean?
    Welcome to Eupedia ludvighoel. Please use Reply with Quote button in response to others. Otherwise it is hard to guess who you are talking to. It is in lower right corner of each post.
    It might not display before you get to ten posts, so I heard.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ludvighoel View Post
    HJow do you become a member?
    Generally, you have to take a formally administered test and score above a specific level. The Mensa homepage has plenty of information on this, including what exams are accepted and what the minimum required score is for each. You only have to pass one exam.

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    This is a slightly old post, but why not dive right in.

    Define your definition of "high intelligence". I have seen numerous well educated, and "intelligent", people drive vehicles with less skill than a one-armed half blinded chimp.


    I have always looked at it this way - intelligence is your ability to comprehend. Not your book smarts.


    Let's keep with driving for an example; let's say you can't parallel park without taking the rear & front fenders off, hitting the curb, or likewise doing something non-correct in your attempt. Now, despite all your fancy degrees, you're really not that intelligent because you can't comprehend turning the stirring wheel one way, turns the vehicle the other way. Similarly, tailgaters, speeders, etc., etc., etc. all show limited intelligence because they can't comprehend setting the alarm 30 minutes earlier will keep you from been late somewhere. Another example, I had one colleague with a PhD at an environmental lab and he continually whined about how he was checking in with seconds to spare because he kept getting caught at the train tracks that bisected the town. If he was really intelligent he'd have long since realized the train has a well-established schedule [something I realized within the first week] and plan his drive properly.

    If you're going to turn around and say chimps can't drive - sorry, one of the major "attractions" at one point were indeed chimps driving at circuses, go-karts but they still have wheels & an engine of sorts. You are instead "smart" - the same way animals are considered smart after they learn through repetition. And what is education but the pounding of the same stuff over & over into your skull until you can recite it in your sleep.



    Now let me pull this original piece apart a little.

    I know a number of very intelligent individuals:
    1) a close friend who is a Mensa member, his PhD completed by 27.
    2) My father completed his Bachelors and his Masters within half the standard time. He had his Bachelors, in psychology, done within just 2 years due to overload of courses [and he was an honours student].
    3) My 2nd cousin is considered something of a genius in his field as well as being capable of speaking seven different languages fluently by age 28. He’s in the art field by the way, given your last comment.
    4) Another close friend, likewise Mensa member.



    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo View Post
    We have seen in this thread that IQ is strongly hereditary, that children with highly educated parents also tended to have higher IQ's, and especially that male hormones significantly increased IQ (because IQ only testes typically male reasoning skills, like logic and spatial skills). We saw that the higher the IQ, the bigger the gap in numbers between men and women.

    Because IQ is so intricately linked to male hormones, it is normal to see a correlation between very high IQ and masculine social behaviour.

    The higher the IQ, the higher the sense of individuality and the independence of mind. Exceptionally gifted people care (much) less about what other people think of them, and are less sensitive to praise, and even less to flattery.
    Let’s clarify something here. Higher IQ is, potentially, linked with HIGH testosterone. Nothing else. As there are numerous factors that can influence testosterone – including genetically inherited problems – this “find” is ultimately irrelevant. Not to mention the backlash of having HIGH testosterone would probably handicap any benefit to so called “high” IQ.

    By the way, IQ tests are widely considered useless nowadays. Only the spatial test is considered legit for intelligence testing; the written / math part is merely how well you can recount information and not true intelligence.

    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo View Post
    Because they care less about the opinion and esteem of others, they tend to be less socially oriented, but also feel less easily lonely. Maybe it is because they have a very heightened sense of the "self".
    This would be correct of truly intelligent people and not merely book smart people. I am truly intelligent as I can comprehend information within seconds of receiving it. Like dad I have never had an accident in my life while driving [he is likewise truly intelligent and has never had an accident in 50 years driving all around the world].

    I am also considered gifted in the artistic field and also with technology as I learn with startlingly ease and alarming speed. I work in a very diverse field that requires considerable focus, multitasking skill, time management, and team work knowledge.


    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo View Post
    They feel pressed to tell openly what they think to others, especially when they hear something that conflicts with their reasoning or knowledge. They value more truth, facts and logic than friendship or emotional relations.

    Gifted people therefore only care about social conventions they agree with, and (harshly) criticise the others. They live in an inner world where anything that is not rational is wrong and should be changed. It is unconceivable to them to bask in mediocrity. They are born perfectionists (for what they care about).

    Their disregard for conventions, combined with vivid, creative and independent mind, often make them coin new words (often just for fun, to see the reaction of those who care about conventions), or use rare words (not by pedantry at all, but just because they like them better). In other words, they recreate the conventions for themselves.
    Hardly. I suppose your mother never told you of arrogance? Someone who is truly intelligent knows that one is only as intelligent as their knowledge. If you limit your knowledge base with an attitude of “I am mightier than you” or my belief “is better than you” you learn nothing new and will, when someone better comes along, be much like a fish out of water trying to compensate.

    I mentioned I am regarded as something of a gifted individual correct? I had two university degrees completed by the time I was 20, one honours and the other just below honours standing. Completely unrelated fields by the way so it wasn’t as if I could transfer half the credits/courses into the second degree afterwards.

    I never took a Mensa test, though the government / military (when I was 17) evaluated my IQ as 149, because simply put I couldn’t careless. What am I going to do – flag down the taxi driver and scream at him get me to JKF Airport ASAP as I’m a Mensa member.

    Now I love getting “down” and “dirty” with the “lesser intelligent” people, or the not so gifted, individuals I work with. Would you like to know how many times I’ve made some newbie jump out of their skin after responding to someone higher in the totem pole [e.g. employer] calling my name? I scare the “crap” out of these “not so gifted” because they think me just another “grunt”.

    But guess what your arrogance will keep you from ever learning techniques and knowledge these “lesser” people have through their own hands-on experience and which you will be hard pressed to learn in school.

    As for the last bit, yes it is very intelligent to use a word no one but you would understand. I wonder how many “intelligent” people have to tell the grunts something twenty times using high tech / rare words before it gets through to the “intelligent” person to dumb down the conversation.


    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo View Post
    Typical high-IQ people are constantly thinking about something, worried about a problem, thinking about solutions... So they end up having little time and energy left, and little motivation, for ordinary chit-chat. Because they are constantly "navigating in their thoughts", they tend to be more forgetful of trivial things ("damn, I forgot to remove the clothes from the washing machine last night !").
    Ask a truly intelligent person – we’ll call our brains compartmentalized, which they are. Important, somewhat important, irrelevant. However, some of us truly intelligent people can train our brains to pull up that trivial information before leaving the house. Some less “intelligent” put checklists on the fridge; we can put checklists in our brains – it is part of that needed above-average focus of intelligent people.

    I said I work in a field that requires considerable focus. I can still recall the license plate number & the truck color of the transport that went sailing off the ledge of one of the roads that cut through the Rocky Mountains, brakes overheated, nearly 18 years later. I can draw you to an extremely accurate blueprint, as long as there are no changes, of sites I worked at up to 12 years ago. To the whole of my life, that information is as irrelevant as having stubbed my toe last year.

    And no I don’t have a photographic memory. I am horrible at remembering names, which to me is irrelevant. Simply put I don’t care if I work with people that have the same name (I have worked with five women each a variation on the name Rose) or call themselves CoffeeStain … what is relevant is what is their task and how can I apply their skill. But I can remember people’s faces years later and place them where I worked with them.


    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo View Post
    Their strong independence of mind and deep intellectualisation of things results in exceptionally gifted people having stronger individual interests than average ("passions" for some topics or activities). Once they get into something, they want to know everything about it (which can make them look like geeks or freaks to ordinary folk).

    High IQ correlates strongly with exceptional concentration abilities. The problem is that it makes such people quite stubborn until they know or understand what they wanted. Such children are known for always asking "why" questions, and never give up until they get a satisfactory answer.
    Yes, I have exceptional concentration abilities, however, when I didn’t get a satisfactory answer, I figured it out myself. It was something dad taught us because guess what – people lie, facts lie, etc. Unless you see something, learn something or experience something with your own eyes, your own hands, and your own mind you are getting nothing more than 2nd, 3rd, 4th, etc. hand information.

    One reason when I am researching anything – as I do write books in my science field – I have so much reference material I could be lost in a sea of paper. Truly intelligent people NEVERtake anything at face value, rather, they ALWAYS look for what is beyond the written word, the image, the hype.

    Now I tore about and rebuilt my first computer out of spare parts when I was 15 years old; that would be the only time I have ever actively followed anything resembling an instruction manual.



    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo View Post
    One thing that normally irritates people with high IQ is asking them to explain something (complex), then stop listening in the middle of their explanations. Exceptionally gifted people just can't understand why one would ask a question and not care about the answer, when they visibly do not understand that topic.
    I love teaching people things. If someone asks me to clarify something I have never stuck my nose in the air and said go bug Boris, I’m busy. This is a trait I picked up from my cousin who is the LEAD researcher in MAJOR neurological research and has been for 12 years. He has his own team at his beck & call.

    If someone is getting “bored” during your explanation, it means you really got to step down a peg and try again. My professor was a genius from India, absolutely brilliant man – could do advanced calculus, trigonometry and algebra of 7 lines in his head. If someone didn’t get it then he started all over again, because as he said a truly intelligent person is someone that EVERYONE in the room can understand.


    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo View Post
    At school, exceptionally gifted children are easily bored by lessons, because they understand before everyone else and get irritated when the teacher has to repeat for slower people. If it is a subject they are particularily interested in, they usually have learned everything by themselves before, which can create conflicts with the teacher, as gifted children do not mind correcting the teacher's slightest mistake in front of the whole class (that's their way of showing that they shouldn't be sitting in that class in a humiliating position of inferiority - well, you know how wild and vain kids can be !).
    Again arrogance.

    I tutored those “slower” kids because yes I already knew the information.

    However, again, it comes down to the true indicator of intelligence – comprehension. What are you gaining by been arrogant [rude] or simply put a bear-sized pain in the arse of the teacher who is merely doing as best as they can … assisting that teacher will get you through that class faster, easier and with less interruptions.



    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo View Post
    On the whole, exceptionally gifted people tend to be hyperactive, eat a lot and sleep a lot (because the brain uses so much energy), or on the contrary eat and sleep very little (these are exceptions, like Napoleon, probably due to a different metabolism).
    A category for both? How about active intelligent people?

    I have gone 72 hours with barely a cat’s nap worth of sleep at times due to time crunches – such as when the employer decided it was a “fantastic” idea to change his ideas / request halfway through the project.

    I would be more the exception like Napoleon a supposed different metabolism. More it came down to the simple fact – too busy to stuff face with food and as the brain is indeed always working for those truly intelligent it makes sleep very difficult. However, he was, by the way well known to suffer stomach issues and be insomniac so he was not an alien child with an alien metabolism.

    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo View Post
    At work, they have difficulty understanding why other people can't do as much as they do in the same amount of time, or don't do things as well as they should. They are usually unsatisfied by others, demanding, strict, and feel like they have to do things by themselves if they want them to be done properly...
    You have problems understanding why people take more time? Really? The supposedly “less intelligent” person is oftentimes very unorganized and lacks focus; it really is, eight out of ten times, that simple.

    That last bit about wanting to do it yourself – again overhype of “rare words” to seem “intelligent” thus breaking down the communication between the “intelligent” person and the not so “intelligent” person. If the people are not following your directions properly it isn’t because they’re stupid – it is oftentimes because your directions leave much to be desired.

    Again indicator of true intelligence – comprehension. If you can’t comprehend that your colleagues are misunderstanding what you are saying, well, just how is one really “intelligent”.


    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo View Post
    High-IQ people are very individualistic, but they usually strive for the common good (as well as their own interests). Their passion for things, their sense of logic, and their desire for perpetual improvement, make of them good politicians and philosophers. On the other hand, they usually dislike routine jobs, with predefinied tasks and little space for creativity and a sense of intellectual challenge.

    Given their individualism, they rarely bear the authority of other people, and are therefore more often self-made people, free-thinkers and entrepreneurs, rather than conventional academics or professionals employed by a company.
    Never heard of a hobby by chance? Most truly intelligent people get hobbies because it does keep their mind active instead of going stagnant.

    I mentioned the guy from India, who was a Professor, he could wipe the floor without breaking a sweat with most of those “highly intelligent” people you mentioned. He was a photographer by the way, that was his hobby.

    In fact, he did once, by crushing the “life” out of a racist with his responses. The “intelligent” racist, a local businessman by the way who had done well for himself, thought because he had a multitude of degrees he actually had something worth saying. That Professor from India, with the dull mundane job, got a standing ovation when he was done from everyone in City Hall. If he hadn't owned businesses in the city I am quite sure we'd never have seen "intelligent" businessman again - just hanging his head.


    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo View Post
    Having a high IQ has little influence on most of the arts, as IQ only testes rational, logic and spatial skills. It may help for sculpture (spatial skills), or classsical music (rational and spatial).
    I’d like to see an “intelligent” businessman do some of the jaw-dropping art that can be found around the world.

    High IQ has nothing to do with art, you better believe it because the IQ test is irrelevant to the testing of TRUE intelligence. Everyone has known since last year, if not earlier even for it was rumbling around the science field in 2012, that standard IQ tests are utterly worthless for testing TRUE intelligence.

    IQ tests – except for spatial – tests how well you can recount information. How good your education was, how well you can memorize information… and nothing resembling real intelligence.

    I work in the artistic field, technology too. I said, above, my second degree was in a completely unrelated field - biochemistry. Intelligence has "nothing" to do with art, uh-huh; if anything artists are above average intelligence because their brains are constantly working differently than average joe mundane jobber.

    A good artist can turn anything into a masterpiece because our brains are ALWAYS working, always testing new ideas, always looking at things from a different angle. A book smart "intelligent" person needs to consult a few books before he even tries.


    Sorry, mean no insult, but for a post about "High IQ" there doesn't seem to be a single cent of knowledge that the IQ tests are deemed widely invalid.

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    @Claymore2. Keep in mind that people with extremely good memory can learn anything and pass almost any test. They might have great jobs, good positions, etc, but they might not be truly intelligent people. They might seem intelligent, but they are really not. To be totally honest, memory is a big part of intelligence, but what I mean is that super memory can help and make some people well function in complicated environment and do complicated jobs. Even though they are lacking true intelligence; critical thinking, pattern recognition and cognitive creativity.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Claymore2 View Post
    Define your definition of "high intelligence".
    For a start I would avoid this kind of redundant verb-object combination. Did you mean simply: "define intelligence" ?

    There are many types of intelligence: logic, mathematical, analytical, critical, organizational, spatio-visual, linguistic, musical, social (e.g. understanding the way people interact), psychological (e.g. understanding how the human mind works and why people act the way they do), philosophical, and so on. These can be further differentiated. Some people are great orators, but poor writers. Others uses their mother tongue sublimely but are terrible at learning foreign languages. Others still have a perfect command of grammar, but can't imitate accents, or vice versa.

    Athletic abilities are a subtype of visuospatial abilities, but obviously not the same as the one that makes you understand geometry, which is also different from the one you use to play video games, or to draw a world map from memory, or to park your car.

    Intelligence is one person's average 'score' for all categories of the human intellect. Definitions always miss something. Just make the total of a person's capabilities and you get an idea of their intelligence. Of course there is no way to reliably measure that at present (or it would be really tedious and time-consuming).

    I have seen numerous well educated, and "intelligent", people drive vehicles with less skill than a one-armed half blinded chimp.
    Then you have met some kinds of savants with only one part of their brain functioning properly, maybe due to an brain injury. Truly intelligent people are good at everything (at least if they practice a bit, as the brain atrophies without practice). For example my visuospatial IQ is about 165 and I can parallel park my car between two cars in reverse on my first try without looking backward and faster than most people. I just feel the car moving into position inside my mind. But it didn't come without a few months of practice when I first started driving a car. IQ gives you potential. IQ alone is meaningless without developing skills.

    I have always looked at it this way - intelligence is your ability to comprehend. Not your book smarts.
    Too restrictive definition. A good science writer is not necessarily someone who understand science the most deeply, and vice versa. A great painter or musician is not necessarily a great art critic or art historian. Performing uses a different part of the brain from understanding.

    I know a number of very intelligent individuals:
    1) a close friend who is a Mensa member, his PhD completed by 27.
    2) My father completed his Bachelors and his Masters within half the standard time. He had his Bachelors, in psychology, done within just 2 years due to overload of courses [and he was an honours student].
    3) My 2nd cousin is considered something of a genius in his field as well as being capable of speaking seven different languages fluently by age 28. He’s in the art field by the way, given your last comment.
    4) Another close friend, likewise Mensa member.
    Academic performance does not correlate as much to very high IQ as to having a good memory and being able to know what is expected of you. Statistically people with Masters and PhD are more likely to have moderately high IQ (between 115 and 135). Truly gifted individuals may not see the value of being tested by people who know much less than them and can't think as clearly. It also depends what one is studying. Having an exceptionally high mathematical/logic and spatio-visual IQ won't help you much to study foreign languages if your verbal IQ is low. Likewise being extremely articulate and picking up languages easily is not going to get you a PhD in physics. I am not sure how common it is to have a very big gap in non-verbal and verbal IQ though. There are genes that influence the whole brain plasticity and should therefore increase all types of intelligence. But some genes do grant special abilities in one field too.

    Mensa accepts the top 2% of the population, which is an awful lot of people. For profoundly gifted individuals, the IQ gap with someone who barely made it to Mensa can be greater than between the latter and an average person (IQ of 100). In other terms, the bottom Mensan with an IQ of 132 is 22 IQ points away from an average intelligence (range 90 to 110), but 38 points away from someone with an IQ of 170.

    The Mensa test is based on crystallised non-verbal intelligence, which tests mostly mathematical, logic and spatio-visual skills, and to some extent low-grade analytical skills. It does not test critical thinking (such as judging the value and merits of the test), linguistic or artistic skills, social, psychological or philosophical intelligence, nor creative potential.

    It is not surprising that some people with extremely high IQ can still believe in god, because a high IQ does not mean that the person possesses a strong critical sense, an independent personality (easily free of social influence, peer pressure, culture and traditions), or a high psychological and philosophical intelligence (required to understand that religions are man-made and gods modelled on the human mind).

    Another problem with IQ tests, not only Mensa's but any IQ test, is that even in the categories they do test, they only assess comprehension, not performance or creativity. Someone who gets a high score at a verbal IQ test, for example, is someone with a good understanding of language, but that doesn't mean that he or she would make a good writer, a good orator, a good stand-up comedian, or even a good communicator. All these require a lot of practice and other skills that are much harder to test. Same for non-verbal IQ.

    Let’s clarify something here. Higher IQ is, potentially, linked with HIGH testosterone. Nothing else. As there are numerous factors that can influence testosterone – including genetically inherited problems – this “find” is ultimately irrelevant. Not to mention the backlash of having HIGH testosterone would probably handicap any benefit to so called “high” IQ.
    Testosterone only shapes the brain development in the womb, and actually only during one specific period of pregnancy. Boys and girls both have low testosterone before puberty. When boys start producing testosterone at puberty, it will affect their body and sexual behaviour, but it won't change their neural pathways the way testosterone did when they were foetuses. That's too late. Anyway testosterone in the womb will only increase male types of intelligence, like spatio-visual, logic and analytical skills, but not female ones relating to empathy, communication, social skills, etc.
    Last edited by Maciamo; 23-12-16 at 10:20. Reason: typo
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    Then you have met some kinds of savants with only one part of their brain functioning properly, maybe due to an brain injury. Truly intelligent people are good at everything (at least if they practice a bit, as the brain atrophies without practice). For example my visuospatial IQ is about 165 and I can parallel park my car between two cars in reverse on my first try without looking backward and faster than most people. I just feel the cat moving into position inside my mind. But it didn't come without a few months of practice when I first started driving a car. IQ gives you potential. IQ alone is meaningless without developing skills.

    I agree with this. There is a balance where intelligence is displayed. Being able to drive well,cook etc,etc . There are some oddballs though,where they excel at one task such as math ,but are as average as the next one.

    I also agree with the original post, as Many of those characteristics are displayed by me .
    For a while there I thought I was alone.

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    The score on the Binet-Simon scale would reveal the child's mental age. For example, a six-year-old child who passed all the tasks usually passed by six-year-olds—but nothing beyond—would have a mental age that matched his chronological age, 6.0. (Fancher, 1985). Binet thought that intelligence was multifaceted, but came under the control of practical judgment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo View Post
    We have seen in this thread that IQ is strongly hereditary, that children with highly educated parents also tended to have higher IQ's, and especially that male hormones significantly increased IQ (because IQ only testes typically male reasoning skills, like logic and spatial skills). We saw that the higher the IQ, the bigger the gap in numbers between men and women.

    Because IQ is so intricately linked to male hormones, it is normal to see a correlation between very high IQ and masculine social behaviour.

    The higher the IQ, the higher the sense of individuality and the independence of mind. Exceptionally gifted people care (much) less about what other people think of them, and are less sensitive to praise, and even less to flattery.

    Because they care less about the opinion and esteem of others, they tend to be less socially oriented, but also feel less easily lonely. Maybe it is because they have a very heightened sense of the "self".

    They feel pressed to tell openly what they think to others, especially when they hear something that conflicts with their reasoning or knowledge. They value more truth, facts and logic than friendship or emotional relations.

    Gifted people therefore only care about social conventions they agree with, and (harshly) criticise the others. They live in an inner world where anything that is not rational is wrong and should be changed. It is unconceivable to them to bask in mediocrity. They are born perfectionists (for what they care about).

    Their disregard for conventions, combined with vivid, creative and independent mind, often make them coin new words (often just for fun, to see the reaction of those who care about conventions), or use rare words (not by pedantry at all, but just because they like them better). In other words, they recreate the conventions for themselves.

    Typical high-IQ people are constantly thinking about something, worried about a problem, thinking about solutions... So they end up having little time and energy left, and little motivation, for ordinary chit-chat. Because they are constantly "navigating in their thoughts", they tend to be more forgetful of trivial things ("damn, I forgot to remove the clothes from the washing machine last night !").

    Their strong independence of mind and deep intellectualisation of things results in exceptionally gifted people having stronger individual interests than average ("passions" for some topics or activities). Once they get into something, they want to know everything about it (which can make them look like geeks or freaks to ordinary folk).

    High IQ correlates strongly with exceptional concentration abilities. The problem is that it makes such people quite stubborn until they know or understand what they wanted. Such children are known for always asking "why" questions, and never give up until they get a satisfactory answer.

    One thing that normally irritates people with high IQ is asking them to explain something (complex), then stop listening in the middle of their explanations. Exceptionally gifted people just can't understand why one would ask a question and not care about the answer, when they visibly do not understand that topic.

    At school, exceptionally gifted children are easily bored by lessons, because they understand before everyone else and get irritated when the teacher has to repeat for slower people. If it is a subject they are particularily interested in, they usually have learned everything by themselves before, which can create conflicts with the teacher, as gifted children do not mind correcting the teacher's slightest mistake in front of the whole class (that's their way of showing that they shouldn't be sitting in that class in a humiliating position of inferiority - well, you know how wild and vain kids can be !).


    On the whole, exceptionally gifted people tend to be hyperactive, eat a lot and sleep a lot (because the brain uses so much energy), or on the contrary eat and sleep very little (these are exceptions, like Napoleon, probably due to a different metabolism).

    At work, they have difficulty understanding why other people can't do as much as they do in the same amount of time, or don't do things as well as they should. They are usually unsatisfied by others, demanding, strict, and feel like they have to do things by themselves if they want them to be done properly...

    High-IQ people are very individualistic, but they usually strive for the common good (as well as their own interests). Their passion for things, their sense of logic, and their desire for perpetual improvement, make of them good politicians and philosophers. On the other hand, they usually dislike routine jobs, with predefinied tasks and little space for creativity and a sense of intellectual challenge.

    Given their individualism, they rarely bear the authority of other people, and are therefore more often self-made people, free-thinkers and entrepreneurs, rather than conventional academics or professionals employed by a company.

    Having a high IQ has little influence on most of the arts, as IQ only testes rational, logic and spatial skills. It may help for sculpture (spatial skills), or classsical music (rational and spatial).
    We all are the product of randomness. At least until now. Later the people could be engineered. Intelligence has to do with the part of the brain that deals with thinking. The gray area. If this part of the brain is bigger the IQ is higher. It does not have to do with the size of the head since it might not be the grey area. Inheritance always has a role but its not determinant. Einstein had two sons and neither one was intellectually above the average. I don't trust IQ tests a lot. Many tested high IQ people have failed. When I am trying to picture people with high IQ I think of Darwin. We still discovering what Charlz Darwin told as hundreds of years ago They don't necessary excel all the time but when time comes they strike on target. To me an high IQ person is quiet, not talkative and question everything

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    I've never had my IQ tested I believe that overall it's above average. I began sleeping late at around three years ago. It's 2AM where I am and I'm still awake. I'm individualistic but not like the North American / Anglo-Saxon way which can be better defined as selfishness and hyper-competitiveness. I'm not a very rational person as I brood and obsess over things quite easily. I can be quite paranoid at times.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zionas View Post
    I've never had my IQ tested I believe that overall it's above average. I began sleeping late at around three years ago. It's 2AM where I am and I'm still awake. I'm individualistic but not like the North American / Anglo-Saxon way which can be better defined as selfishness and hyper-competitiveness. I'm not a very rational person as I brood and obsess over things quite easily. I can be quite paranoid at times.
    Interesting. Where I'm from, Canada, we have lots of international students from China, and they are known for being hyper-competitive and selfish. Also notorious for sticking to their groups and sharing old exams. You must be a different kind of Chinese. I bet you've never even met a white person since no western people really go to China unless we're spending money to feed your economy or temporarily work in a field for a Chinese company that requires an English speaker for some reason and boost your GDP. Funny.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zionas View Post
    I've never had my IQ tested I believe that overall it's above average. I began sleeping late at around three years ago. It's 2AM where I am and I'm still awake. I'm individualistic but not like the North American / Anglo-Saxon way which can be better defined as selfishness and hyper-competitiveness. I'm not a very rational person as I brood and obsess over things quite easily. I can be quite paranoid at times.
    Have you thought about seeing a therapist?
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    The same team I have worked with at the University of Prague once published a paper on certain looks people with high IQ might have in common:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lTI_Zq0rPgA&t=113s
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