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Thread: RH negative factor

  1. #26
    Regular Member Duarte's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingjohn View Post
    Most common blood type to the least common
    Blood type
    https://www.scbb.org/donor-informati...ight-time.html
    Ethnic distribution of ABO (without Rh) blood types[42]
    (This table has more entries than the table above but does not distinguish between Rh types.)
    People group O (%) A (%) B (%) AB (%)
    Aboriginal people 61 39 0 0
    Abyssinians 43 27 25 5
    Ainu (Japan) 17 32 32 18
    Albanians 38 43 13 6
    Grand Andamanese 9 60 23 9
    Arabs 34 31 29 6
    Armenians 31 50 13 6
    Asian Americans 40 28 27 5
    Austrians 36 44 13 6
    Bantus 46 30 19 5
    Basques 51 44 4 1
    Belgians 47 42 8 3
    Bororo (Brazil) 100 0 0 0
    Brazilians 47 41 9 3
    Bulgarians 32 44 15 8
    Burmese 36 24 33 7
    Buryats (Siberia) 33 21 38 8
    Bushmen 56 34 9 2
    Catalans 43 46 7.5 3.5
    Chinese-Canton 46 23 25 6
    Chinese-Ningbo 35 32 25 9
    Chinese-Yangzhou 31 32 27 10
    Chinese-Peking 29 27 32 13
    Chuvash 30 29 33 7
    Croats 42 34 17 7
    Czechs 30 44 18 9
    Danes 41 44 11 4
    Dutch 45 43 9 3
    Egyptians 33 36 24 8
    English 47 42 9 3
    Inuit (Alaska) 38 44 13 5
    Inuit (Greenland) 54 36 23 8
    Estonians 34 36 23 8
    Fijians 44 34 17 6
    Finns 34 41 18 7
    French 43 47 7 3
    Georgians 46 37 12 4
    Germans 41 43 11 5
    Greeks 40 42 14 5
    Romani people(Hungary) 29 27 35 10
    Hawaiians 37 61 2 1
    Hindus (Bombay) 29 25 35 11
    Hungarians 36 43 16 5
    Icelanders 56 32 10 3
    Indians (India) 29 21 40 9
    Native Americans 79 16 4 1
    Irish 52 35 10 3
    Italians (Milan) 46 41 11 3
    Japanese 30 38 22 10
    Jews (Germany) 42 41 12 5
    Jews (Poland) 33 41 18 8
    Kalmuks 26 23 41 11
    Kikuyu (Kenya) 60 19 20 1
    Koreans 28 32 31 10
    Sami people 29 63 4 4
    Latvians 32 37 24 7
    Lithuanians 40 34 20 6
    Malays 62 18 20 0
    Māori 46 54 1 0
    Mayans 98 1 1 1
    Moros 64 16 20 0
    Navajo Indians 73 27 0 0
    Nicobarese 74 9 15 1
    Norwegians 39 50 8 4
    Papuans (New Guinea) 41 27 23 9
    Persians 38 33 22 7
    Peruvian Indians 100 0 0 0
    Filipinos 45 22 27 6
    Poles 33 39 20 9
    Portuguese 35 53 8 4
    Romanians 33 43 16 8
    Russians 33 36 23 8
    Sardinians 50 26 19 5
    Scots 51 34 12 3
    Serbians 38 42 16 5
    Shompen Nicobarese 100 0 0 0
    Slovaks 42 37 16 5
    Somalis[43] 50.1 29.6 15.2 5.1
    South Africans 45 40 11 4
    Spanish 38 47 10 5
    Sudanese 62 16 21 0
    Swedish 38 47 10 5
    Swiss 40 50 7 3
    Tatars 28 30 29 13
    Thais 37 22 33 8
    Turks 43 34 18 6
    Ukrainians 37 40 18 6
    Black Americans 49 27 20 4
    White Americans 45 40 11 4
    Vietnamese 42 22 30 5
    Blood group B has its highest frequency in South Asia where it ranks first as the largest share of the earth's population. In Southeast Asia the share of the population is high, especially in Thailand and Indonesia, then in East Asia, Northern Asia and neighboring Central Asia, and its incidence diminishes both towards the east and the west, falling to single digit percentages in Netherlands, Norway, Portugal and Switzerland.[44][45] It is believed to have been entirely absent from Native American and Australian Aboriginal populations prior to the arrival of Europeans in those areas.[45][46]
    Blood group A is associated with high frequencies in Europe, especially in Scandinavia and Central Europe, although its highest frequencies occur in some Australian Aboriginal populations and the Blackfoot Indians of Montana, the US.[47][48]

    Source: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloo...ion_by_country

  2. #27
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    O + Milky-Way


  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salento View Post
    O + Milky-Way
    my father and sister has blood type O
    my mother A+
    me A+
    Wife and all my children A-
    paternal grandfather AB
    father brother O
    grandfather nephew AB ...................
    Fathers mtdna ... T2b17
    Grandfather mtdna ... T1a1e
    Sons mtdna ... K1a4
    Mum paternal line ... R1b-S8172
    Grandmum paternal side ... I1-Y33791
    Wife paternal line ... R1a-Z282

  4. #29
    Regular Member firetown's Avatar
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    I have recently posted that Poland has 19.67% rh negatives. Looking at national frequencies is important, but since nations can be quite genetically diverse, looking at regional data has proven to be even more informative. Due to my own ancestry, Silesia has been of great interest to me in terms of where the rh negative blood in my own family might come from.
    The following study from 2017 will reveal that Lower Silesia has the highest frequency of rh negative people in all of Poland and also the highest frequency of blood type O. 21.1% rh negatives among women and 19.2% rh negatives among men. This is a huge difference between male and female data which needs to be further examined. Both, rh negative and blood type O frequencies have been decreasing drastically.

    https://www.rhesusnegative.net/stayn...e-frequencies/

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by torzio View Post
    my father and sister has blood type O
    my mother A+
    me A+
    Wife and all my children A-
    paternal grandfather AB
    father brother O
    grandfather nephew AB ...................
    R1 was blood type O

    https://www.eupedia.com/forum/thread...l=1#post597231

  6. #31
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  7. #32
    Regular Member firetown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salento View Post

    More than half of Northern Ireland is blood type O. More than 27% RH Negative.

  8. #33
    Regular Member Duarte's Avatar
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    1 members found this post helpful.
    My posts, moved from the wrong thread to the right thread (this one):

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Originally Posted by Regio X:
    These are very interesting infos. Thank you.


    As for when the deletion ocurred, a curiosity is that these variations may be observed in primates.


    "Chimpanzees have been found thus far to have primarily type A blood, with type O less commonly. Gorillas appear to be exclusively type B. Orangutans express all three blood types."
    https://carta.anthropogeny.org/moca/...and-prevalence
    Monkey Rhesus would be exclusively B, as Gorillas.


    I guess the prevalence of one over the others may be sometimes related to environment/selection (as possibly RH- in Steppe?).


    As for blood type in my family, in theory my parents, as AO, would have 25% of chances of having an AA child, but I'm AO after all, according to 23andMe Raw Data. My parents and my siblings are all RH+, as myself, my wife (O+) and my son (A+). However, my O+ brother has an O- daughter, which means that he's heterozygous. The odds are that just one of my parents is RH heterozygous, since they had 5 children, and all RH+.


    Reply: Me: A RH+. My wife: A RH-. My son: A RH-. My mother: A RH+. My father: O RH+.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Originally Posted by firetown:

    AO rh+/-


    Reply: Yes. Conclusion: I am heterozygous in the RH factor and I am heterozygous in the ABO classification system. This means that I am more healthy? I don’t Know
    But, in fact, I am a healthy person, thanks God.


    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Originally Posted by firetown:
    Rh blood group system wise for the most part.
    ABO wise it depends. As I have posted above, when it comes to COVID-19, malaria and a few others, being phenotype A may carry some disadvantages.


    By the way:


    In European populations Rh positive heterozygotes seem most frequent over rh negative and rh positive homozygotes.


    https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0141362


    Reply: Thank you for providing the link to the paper.
    Cheers :)


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Originally Posted by Regio X:
    Out of curiosity:
    "The research, carried out in collaboration with the IRCCS San Camillo Hospital Foundation in Venice, shows that people with an ‘O’ blood type have more grey matter in their brain, which helps to protect against diseases such as Alzheimer’s, than those with ‘A’, ‘B’ or ‘AB’ blood types."
    https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/news/nr/...sease-1.469296
    See also:
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...61923015000805


    Reply: Dear Regio X,
    Maybe my dad is a point off the curve, then. Intelligent, politicized, cultured, a great classical music lover, he gave me classes in public accounting and balance sheet analysis, when I knew nothing about it, providing me with a wide range of books and preparing exercises to train me. I owe a big part of my personal and professional success to him. He retired and remained a great devourer of books and newspapers. Sometimes I had a hard time keeping up with his quick thinking. At 80 he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. At 84 he was admitted, when his brain could no longer control even his breathing. He died after 3 months in an ICU. I am flattered when the paternal and maternal family members say that I am the son who most resembles him physically: “The father's features and the mother's skin tone”. He was blood type O, factor RH +. According to the doctor, he resisted because he was a strong man with a healthy heart, who insisted on continuing to beat. My biggest fear: Having Alzheimer and dying the same way he died
    Cheers
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  9. #34
    Regular Member firetown's Avatar
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    2 members found this post helpful.
    Good idea. Since it connects to COVID-19 and rh negative blood, here again is my post connecting the both:
    COVID-19 deaths: 1 out of 45 Rh- and 1 out of 8 Rh+ patients (NYP/CUIMC)

    Among the patients with Rh(D) positive blood groups, 1 in 8 died.
    Among the patients with Rh(D) negative blood groups, 1 in 45 died.

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