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Thread: Do Celts still exist?

  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cambria Red View Post
    I do believe there is a legitimate Celtic consciousness. It's an enduring component of the habitus of any population group with Celtic ancestry.
    Can't argue with much of that... although there are certainly degrees. Somebody could challenge, "the Swiss have Celtic ancestors but they don't go around calling themselves Celts!" Well... there are ways in which the Swiss have tiny vestiges of their ancient ancestors, like how many Swiss speak French, and French, although Romance, has words of Gaulish origin.

    Still, the most obvious Celtic peoples nowadays are those who speak a truly Celtic language as their first language and live in culturally Celtic areas. Although uncommon, they exist.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sparkey View Post
    Can't argue with much of that... although there are certainly degrees. Somebody could challenge, "the Swiss have Celtic ancestors but they don't go around calling themselves Celts!" Well... there are ways in which the Swiss have tiny vestiges of their ancient ancestors, like how many Swiss speak French, and French, although Romance, has words of Gaulish origin.

    Still, the most obvious Celtic peoples nowadays are those who speak a truly Celtic language as their first language and live in culturally Celtic areas. Although uncommon, they exist.
    Yes, I agree. A living Celtic language is important but the strength of overall Celticity is paramount - traditions, norms, etc. resulting in Celtic or Celtic-like behaviors.

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    Here in Ireland many people who have a reasonable knowledge of history and culture would classify themselves as Gaels moreso than Celts. We are led to believe from a young age that our culture was a celtic culture which came to be influenced by the succesive waves of invaders and colonisers (Vikings, Cambro-Normans, English, Scottish, French Hueguenots) but large parts of our ancient customs remain commonplace particularily in sport and music. Our national sports of Hurling
    and Gaelic football get the biggest attendances of any sports in Ireland and our traditonal music is commonplace in many pubs throughout the country. Our national language is Irish (Gaelige) and there has been a recent surge in the number of schools which teach through the medium of Irish only in the last 20 years, thus helping to preserve the language into the future.

    However in saying all that, modern Ireland like most other countries is influenced heavily by mass communication and the media. Our indigenous media is quite small so many media publications and TV stations from our neighbours in Britain are widely available in Ireland and American sitcoms are regularly appearing on television. Nobody can be quite sure where all this globalisation will lead though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eireannach View Post
    Here in Ireland many people who have a reasonable knowledge of history and culture would classify themselves as Gaels moreso than Celts. We are led to believe from a young age that our culture was a celtic culture which came to be influenced by the succesive waves of invaders and colonisers (Vikings, Cambro-Normans, English, Scottish, French Hueguenots) but large parts of our ancient customs remain commonplace particularily in sport and music. Our national sports of Hurling
    and Gaelic football get the biggest attendances of any sports in Ireland and our traditonal music is commonplace in many pubs throughout the country. Our national language is Irish (Gaelige) and there has been a recent surge in the number of schools which teach through the medium of Irish only in the last 20 years, thus helping to preserve the language into the future.

    However in saying all that, modern Ireland like most other countries is influenced heavily by mass communication and the media. Our indigenous media is quite small so many media publications and TV stations from our neighbours in Britain are widely available in Ireland and American sitcoms are regularly appearing on television. Nobody can be quite sure where all this globalisation will lead though.
    Great explanation, Great pearson, Great nation....anyone else should learn of this. Congratulations irish.

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    Great post, Eireannach. I think that there is continued confusion regarding the word "Celt," and whether all peoples who speak a Celtic language fit, or a subsection of them, or whether they were just an ancient set of tribes...

    Either way, there seems to be commonality among the cultures historically related to Celtic languages, beyond the P-Celtic/Q-Celtic split. Taking hurling as an example, see the Cornish hurling tradition.

    As for globalization, well... it's inevitable. Not that that's a bad thing per se, because spreading world culture makes us all closer to one another, in a sense. But maintaining local culture is also, in my view, a positive thing.

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    Ireland is the last living celtic nation. Hope they never give up their customs

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    Quote Originally Posted by spongetaro View Post
    Ireland is the last living celtic nation. Hope they never give up their customs
    Independent one anyway, yes? Because we also have Wales as a constituent country within the UK.

    Either way, another thumbs up for Irish culture from me.

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    interesting, how is that of the "gaelic football"? it makes me remember somehow the ancient aztec game of tlachtli.




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    Quote Originally Posted by Eireannach View Post
    However in saying all that, modern Ireland like most other countries is influenced heavily by mass communication and the media. Our indigenous media is quite small so many media publications and TV stations from our neighbours in Britain are widely available in Ireland and American sitcoms are regularly appearing on television. Nobody can be quite sure where all this globalisation will lead though.
    Like language, all cultures are prone to outside influence, it is a natural and healthy process in the evolution of any culture and language. Ireland today is the sum total of its past cultural influences, as is England, Scotland, Wales and Spain. It is what makes us who we are and the process is on-going, just more exelerated than ever before.

    I think the stagnation in China before its re-emergence into the world is a perfect example of what happens when a society closes itself to the outside world. North Korea is another example.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Canek View Post

    interesting, how is that of the "gaelic football"? it makes me remember somehow the ancient aztec game of tlachtli.
    As I understand it, tlachtli was like volleyball, yes? Whereas gaelic football and hurling follow the same pattern as association football, where people try to get a ball into a goal on a field.

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    CELTIC CONSCIOUSNESS:

    An ancient Celtic tradition in North-east Portugal is stick dancing. Also very prevalent in Wales, popularly known as "Morris dancing" (third link down).

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y0V4RwhndKw

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YvyfO...eature=related

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sxeU-...eature=related

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    Another pan-Celtic cultural practice is bardic tradition, practiced today in Wales as eisteddfod. There are also bardic revivals elsewhere, such as in Cornwall.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cambria Red View Post
    CELTIC CONSCIOUSNESS:

    An ancient Celtic tradition in North-east Portugal is stick dancing. Also very prevalent in Wales, popularly known as "Morris dancing".

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y0V4RwhndKw

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YvyfO...eature=related
    I don't know if it's originally celtic, but I can tell you is danced in several parts of Spain, such as la Rioja, Navarra, Aragón and Euskadi. We call it "paloteado" (I think it's not necessary to translate )

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    Quote Originally Posted by Segia View Post
    I don't know if it's originally celtic, but I can tell you is danced in several parts of Spain, such as la Rioja, Navarra, Aragón and Euskadi. We call it "paloteado" (I think it's not necessary to translate )
    It's certainly a practice encountered in a number of Atlantic Facade lands. In Portugal, it is thought to have originated from a Celtic sword dance. Definitely pagan...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Segia View Post
    I don't know if it's originally celtic, but I can tell you is danced in several parts of Spain, such as la Rioja, Navarra, Aragón and Euskadi. We call it "paloteado" (I think it's not necessary to translate )
    Not surprising that it's found in parts of Northern Spain.

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    Something that fascinates me is the mythology of north-Portugal, Asturias, Galicia, Cantabria, Castilla, that has many elements of Celtic origin, and to a less degree roman and germanic (for example the "Malas Cosas" of castilian mythology is of Gothic origin). Here are some articles :

    http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitolog..._c%C3%A1ntabra
    http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitolog%C3%ADa_asturiana
    http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitolog%C3%ADa_castellana

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wilhelm View Post
    Something that fascinates me is the mythology of north-Portugal, Asturias, Galicia, Cantabria, Castilla, that has many elements of Celtic origin, and to a less degree germanic (for example the "Malas Cosas" of castilian mythology is of Gothic origin). Here are some articles :

    http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitolog..._c%C3%A1ntabra
    http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitolog%C3%ADa_asturiana
    http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitolog%C3%ADa_castellana
    There are similar myths in Northern and Central Portugal, much like other lands in the Atlantic Facade, I'm sure.
    Last edited by Cambrius (The Red); 01-04-11 at 03:18.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wilhelm View Post
    Something that fascinates me is the mythology of north-Portugal, Asturias, Galicia, Cantabria, Castilla, that has many elements of Celtic origin, and to a less degree roman and germanic (for example the "Malas Cosas" of castilian mythology is of Gothic origin). Here are some articles :

    http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitolog..._c%C3%A1ntabra
    http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitolog%C3%ADa_asturiana
    http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitolog%C3%ADa_castellana
    To substantiate that is the evidence that Celtic paganism spread wherever people spoke a Celtic language, and the pantheon was consistent, at least to the same degree seen among, for example, the Germanics. The Irish, Britons, Gauls, and Celtiberians all had their own version of Lugus. And there is little doubt that much modern folklore continues to incorporate the old myths to some degree.

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    Quote Originally Posted by spongetaro View Post
    Ireland is the last living celtic nation. Hope they never give up their customs
    Absolutely yes. I hope never give up their customs. Hail to the last living celtic nation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sparkey View Post
    To substantiate that is the evidence that Celtic paganism spread wherever people spoke a Celtic language, and the pantheon was consistent, at least to the same degree seen among, for example, the Germanics. The Irish, Britons, Gauls, and Celtiberians all had their own version of Lugus. And there is little doubt that much modern folklore continues to incorporate the old myths to some degree.
    Quite correct. Many pagan beliefs were shared throughout Atlantic Celtic lands.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sparkey View Post
    Independent one anyway, yes? Because we also have Wales as a constituent country within the UK.

    Either way, another thumbs up for Irish culture from me.
    Thumbs up from me as well.

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    Celtic music form the Atlantic Facade:

    First link is Breton and the second a combined N. Portugal and C. Portugal band.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnMECSyUrME&NR=1

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qWFsqXVC_4Y

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    Good stuff, Cambria.

    Referring to a post I had made in a different thread: a Welsh folk song.

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    Welsh folk song. Compare regional styles.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m6wVo...eature=related

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