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Thread: Haplogroups of your entire family

  1. #1
    Great Adventurer sparkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    17-02-11
    Location
    California
    Posts
    2,251

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    I2c1 PF3892+ (Swiss)
    MtDNA haplogroup
    U4a (Cornish)

    Ethnic group
    3/4 Colonial American, 1/8 Cornish, 1/8 Welsh
    Country: USA - California



    1 members found this post helpful.

    Haplogroups of your entire family

    We often tell each other here something along the lines of: "Don't identify too strongly with your haplogroup. After all, it's not just your haplogroup that makes up your ancestry, and your ancestors have carried many other haplogroups in the past." Well... is that true for you? I'm interested in the YDNA haplogroups of all of your genealogically traceable ancestors and cousins.

    No need to post surnames unless you want to. I also don't really expect everyone to have found as many as I have (I really benefit from having so much colonial American ancestry), just post whatever you know.

    My collection, from most patrilineal to most matrilineal on my family tree:

    I2c-A L596+
    *R1b>probably P312>U152>L2
    R1b>P312>DF27>Z220>Z278
    R1b>P312>U152>L2
    R1b>P312>L21>Z255>L159.2
    G2a L497+
    R1b>probably U106
    R1b>probably P312>U152
    R1b>probably P312>L21
    J2a1 L927+
    I2a1a1 L160+
    I2-M223-Cont1c1 Z79+
    J2a1i L198+
    **J2b
    I1-AS10 Z58+

    *Fun fact: this also happens to be Wyatt Earp's patriline. Let me know if any of you R1b experts want to analyze the STRs of this one to let me know if I'm on the right track in guessing P312>U152>L2.
    **If there are any J2 experts out there, I'd like to try to narrow down the subclade of this one more.

  2. #2
    Banned nordicwarrior's Avatar
    Join Date
    11-10-12
    Posts
    958

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    I1 (M253)
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H

    Ethnic group
    European Mix
    Country: United States



    That's quite a list Sparkey. I'm still stuck on being able to define my primary paternal line much further.

    I'm 98% certain that my paternal grandmother's father was an R1b (extreme west coast of Ireland). But when considering we all have only four great-grandfathers--I have half of my paternal lines figured back to that era. (I have both parents with maternal H lines.)

  3. #3
    Great Adventurer sparkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    17-02-11
    Location
    California
    Posts
    2,251

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    I2c1 PF3892+ (Swiss)
    MtDNA haplogroup
    U4a (Cornish)

    Ethnic group
    3/4 Colonial American, 1/8 Cornish, 1/8 Welsh
    Country: USA - California



    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by nordicwarrior View Post
    I'm 98% certain that my paternal grandmother's father was an R1b (extreme west coast of Ireland). But when considering we all have only four great-grandfathers--I have half of my paternal lines figured back to that era. (I have both parents with maternal H lines.)
    I actually don't think I have any maternal lines other than mine figured out, and one distant cousin who tested my father's father's father's father's maternal line (something like that). Of course, it's usually easier with Y lines, because then you can look for surnames on the family tree and see if anybody has tested that surname with the same common ancestor and put it in the public databases.

    One interesting trend I noticed when looking at the Y lines in my family... when I restrict my family lines to those that had been members of peace churches (Mennonites, Quakers, etc.) when they migrated to America, I get:

    I2c-A L596+
    I2a1a1 L160+
    I2-M223-Cont1c1 Z79+

    All my I2. Coincidence? Add in the line that converted to a peace church later on (J2a1i L198+) and it's still all IJ.

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