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View Poll Results: Who Killed Napoleon?

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  • Francesco Antommarchi (Personal Physician)

    0 0%
  • Hudson Lowe (Governor of St Helena)

    1 33.33%
  • Charles De Montholon

    1 33.33%
  • Stomach Cancer

    1 33.33%
  • Something Else

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Thread: Who killed Napoleon?

  1. #1
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    Question Who killed Napoleon?



    "It was three a.m. Longwood House was quiet and still.

    The dark-clad man held his candle over the open crate of bottles. He removed one, looked at the label — Vin d'Empereur — and with a gloved hand wiped away the thin layer of dust. Carefully, he extracted the cork. From his jacket pocket, he removed a small folded paper, unfolded it and funneled a small amount of white powder along the crease of the paper into the bottle. He replaced the cork, gently screwing it into the mouth of the bottle until only a scant inch appeared above the lip. Then, softly, he walked down the corridor to the kitchen, where he placed the bottle on a tray, next to the crystal goblet reserved for the exclusive use of Napoleon Bonaparte." source




    THE SUSPECTS

    Francesco Antommarchi (Personal Physician)


    Antommarchi left Florence for Saint Helena to become Napoleon I's physician until his death. Antommarchi took up this position at the behest of Napoleon's mother Maria Letizia Ramolino and his uncle Cardinal Joseph Fesch.[2] Antommarchi received a letter of employment on 19 December 1818. Antommarchi was sent to St. Helena in replacement of Dr Barry Edward O'Meara as Napoleon's personal physician, because the illustrious captive would not agree to accept medical officers such as Dr Alexander Baxter or Dr James Roch Verling, who were proposed to him by his custodian, or "gaoler", sir Hudson Lowe. However, Napoleon was not so impressed by Antommarchi's medical skills and even dismissed him from his service a couple of times, only to let him resume his duty soonafter. In the last moments of illness, Antommarchi was assisted by Dr Archibald Arnott, who was accepted by Napoleon at the pressing demands from his two officers, Count Montholon and Grand-Marshal Bertrand.[3] After Napoleon's death, Antommarchi wrote The Last Moments of Napoleon where he concluded that Napoleon died of stomach cancer. read more...

    Hudson Lowe (British Governor of St Helena)

    In addition, modern scholars debate Lowe's role in Napoleon's death. Certainly, his choice of Longwood as an estate was a good one for security but a miserable one for Napoleon's mental and physical health. Lowe's restriction of Napoleon to what amounts to house arrest affected Napoleon's exercise and general health. The discovery of arsenic in Napoleon's hair has renewed theories that be had been poisoned under British oversight. The concentrations show that arsenic was ingested at intervals. Ben Weider's books, Assassination at St. Helena and Assassination at St. Helena Revisited, make an argument that the British had powerful motivations to keep Napoleon healthy, but others (especially the Bourbon monarchy) had more powerful motivations to kill him. The books propose the theory that a member of Napoleon's entourage, Charles Tristan, marquis de Montholon, poisoned him.

    After the death of Napoleon in May 1821, Lowe returned to England. On the publication of O'Meara's book, Lowe resolved to prosecute the author, but his application was too late. But O'Meara's book was softer on Lowe than what the doctor really thought of him and of his role of "executioner" at St. Helena. This is what transpires from the letters he passed clandestinely to a clerk at the Admiralty. read more...

    Charles De Montholon


    There were several reasons for suspecting deMontholon. First, Countess deMontholon, who had left St. Helena in late 1819 with her newborn daughter (named Napoleana) might have been Napoleon's mistress during her time on St. Helena. Some thought Napoleana could have been fathered by Napoleon. The countess — and Mrs. Bertrand as well — had read a book about a murder by chronic arsenic poisoning while on St. Helena. Could deMontholon have gotten the idea for his murder from his wife?

    Second, deMontholon had a very shady history. In addition to vacillating in his loyalty (from 1809 to 1815) between the Bourbon monarchy and Napoleon, he had strong ties to the most notable Napoleon-hater among the Bourbons, Louis XVIII's younger brother, the Duke of Artois, later Charles X, King of France. DeMontholon had also been charged with the theft of funds meant for his own troops, but escaped punishment. How he charmed his way into Napoleon's household, and continued to charm the exiled emperor, is a mystery. He seems to have been successful in manipulating Napoleon, eventually displacing Bertrand as Napoleon's most trusted aide. read more...

    Murder Mystery of Napoleon - Documentary




    Other links:
    Napoleon Killed by his doctors?
    Explaining the Arsenic
    Who's Buried in Napoleon's Tomb?
    Napoleon Death Mystery Solved, Experts Say

  2. #2
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    Looks like an Agatha Christie novel;
    I suspect the Butler in the Chimney room.............its always the Butler;

  3. #3
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    Napoleon should have been killed at the start of the revolution regardless of his rank, it would have saved Europe the millions of people he got butchered. He is in the same mold as Hitler and Attila.
    có che un pòpoło no 'l defende pi ła só łéngua el xe prónto par èser s'ciavo

    when a people no longer dares to defend its language it is ripe for slavery.

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sile View Post
    Napoleon should have been killed at the start of the revolution regardless of his rank, it would have saved Europe the millions of people he got butchered. He is in the same mold as Hitler and Attila.
    You are mistaken. He had not butchered anyone. Britain started the war by breaking The Treaty of Amiens declaring war on Napoleonic France. Later Austria, Russia, Prussia and many others attacked Napoleon. Napoleon never declared war on Britain, Austria nor Prussia. They attacked him. They were the butchers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TPB View Post
    You are mistaken. He had not butchered anyone. Britain started the war by breaking The Treaty of Amiens declaring war on Napoleonic France. Later Austria, Russia, Prussia and many others attacked Napoleon. Napoleon never declared war on Britain, Austria nor Prussia. They attacked him. They were the butchers.
    Sile is still carrying a grudge because Napoleon brought down the doddering Venetian oligarchy.

    That's acturally one of the good things he did: bringing down the ancien regimes all over Europe. They came back after he was defeated and it took another 100 years to either get rid of monarchies or make them powerless.


    Non si fa il proprio dovere perchè qualcuno ci dica grazie, lo si fa per principio, per se stessi, per la propria dignità. Oriana Fallaci

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