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Thread: New map of mtDNA haplogroup V

  1. #1
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    2 out of 2 members found this post helpful.

    Post New map of mtDNA haplogroup V

    After the map of U5 here comes the other major maternal lineage of the Saami, the Basques and the Cantabrians: haplogroup V (including HV0, aka pre-V). V is also well represented among the Berbers from the Maghreb and Libya. HV0 may actually have originated in Northwest Africa during the Paleolithic then crossed over to Iberia, then spread throughout Europe toward the end of the last Ice Age.

    The presence of hg V is remarkably homogeneous in Europe with only a few countries/regions lying outside the 3 to 5% range. Among the outliers, let's note the higher frequencies in the Benelux and West Germany, and in the Rhône valley of France according to Garcia et al. 2011 who found 10.9% in the Lyonnais and 13.5% in the Var department, although both based on small sample sizes (n=46 and n=37). The data for the Benelux is also limited, so once larger sample sizes will be available the percentage of V might fade into the European average.

    V only drops under 2% in Greece and in most of Italy (except the Northeast, Tuscany, Sardinia and Sicily). Note that the data for Sicily and Tuscany are both quite contradictory. Boattini et al. 2013 found 0% of V in Sicily (n=118), but Torroni et al. 2001 found 4.7% in a huge sample (n=634). Boattini et al. also found 1.9% (n=52) in Tuscany, while Achilli 2007 found 5.3% (n=322). (EDIT: the reason for the conflicting data was that Boattini et al. did not report HV0 separately but included it within HV).

    The Caucasus is a real patchwork as usual, with V being found at relatively high levels among the Avars and Azeri, but nearly or completely absent in most other populations.



    UPDATE: a detailed page about the origins, history, distribution and subclades of haplogroup V is now available here.
    Last edited by Maciamo; 10-03-14 at 10:34.
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    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo View Post
    After the map of U5 here comes the other major maternal lineage of the Saami, the Basques and the Cantabrians: haplogroup V (including HV0, aka pre-V). V is also well represented among the Berbers from the Maghreb and Libya. HV0 may actually have originated in Northwest Africa during the Paleolithic then crossed over to Iberia, then spread throughout Europe toward the end of the last Ice Age.

    The presence of hg V is remarkably homogeneous in Europe with only a few countries/regions lying outside the 3 to 5% range. Among the outliers, let's note the higher frequencies in the Benelux and West Germany, and in the Rhône valley of France according to Garcia et al. 2011 who found 10.9% in the Lyonnais and 13.5% in the Var department, although both based on small sample sizes (n=46 and n=37). The data for the Benelux is also limited, so once larger sample sizes will be available the percentage of V might fade into the European average.

    V only drops under 2% in Greece and in most of Italy (except the Northeast, Tuscany, Sardinia and Sicily). Note that the data for Sicily and Tuscany are both quite contradictory. Boattini et al. 2013 found 0% of V in Sicily (n=118), but Torroni et al. 2001 found 4.7% in a huge sample (n=634). Boattini et al. also found 1.9% (n=52) in Tuscany, while Achilli 2007 found 5.3% (n=322).

    The Caucasus is a real patchwork as usual, with V being found at relatively high levels among the Avars and Azeri, but nearly or completely absent in most other populations.


    I don't know how I could have missed it, but the mtDNA sequences from Brisighelli et al that I mentioned in connection with your mtDNA map of U5 are indeed broken out by subclade. There are a lot of them and they can be found here:
    http://www.plosone.org/article/info:...050794-Devoto1
    The actual designation can only be seen if the cursor is moved all the way to the right.

    The sequences are very interesting and very old it seems, at least in Sicily and the South, which are the only areas I've checked so far...
    In Trapani, Sicily, for example, while U5 seems by my count to be at only 2.5%, V comes in at 10%. In Catania, in contrast there is 7.5% U5. (There's also a lot of HV*, at 8%, and H* at 13% in Trapani. In addition, a surprising, to me, amount of "N" lineages and even some "M" also appear there and in other parts of Sicily. There isn't very much U3.

    In the Calabria sequences, the U5 is at 10%, which is quite different, I think, from the map, but more in line perhaps with Greece. The V is minimal, but the HV at 14%.

    It would be great if you could include the Brisighelli sequences in your mtdna maps. They would fill in the picture very well, I think

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    It has a very similar distribution like U5. Old Franco-Cantabrian origin perhaps, but maybe not only.

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    Today, mtdna V tends to be restricted to western, central and Northern Europe. It's age is estimated at 15,000 tears old, indicating it likely arose during the 5,000 or so years that humans were confined to the European refugium during the last ice age (The H-V connection.) it is found in 12% of Basque females, an isolated population of northern Spain, and around 5% in many other west European populations. It is also found in Algeria and Morocco, indicating that these humans migrating out of the Iberian peninsula also headed south across the straight of Gibraltar and into north-Africa. It's genetic diversity reduces gradually as we move from west to east, indicating the migratory direction these groups followed during the post-glacial recolonization. Interestingly, mtdna V attains it's highest frequency in the Skolt Saami of northern Scandinavia, a group of hunter-gatherers who follow the reindeer herds seasonally from Siberia to Scandinavia and back. While V makes up about 50% of mtdna lineages among the Saami, it's genetic diversity is considerably reduced when compared to samples from Western Europe, so this lineages was probably introduced into the Saami only within the past several thousand years.

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    Quote Originally Posted by adamo View Post
    Today, mtdna V tends to be restricted to western, central and Northern Europe. It's age is estimated at 15,000 tears old, indicating it likely arose during the 5,000 or so years that humans were confined to the European refugium during the last ice age (The H-V connection.) it is found in 12% of Basque females, an isolated population of northern Spain, and around 5% in many other west European populations. It is also found in Algeria and Morocco, indicating that these humans migrating out of the Iberian peninsula also headed south across the straight of Gibraltar and into north-Africa. It's genetic diversity reduces gradually as we move from west to east, indicating the migratory direction these groups followed during the post-glacial recolonization. Interestingly, mtdna V attains it's highest frequency in the Skolt Saami of northern Scandinavia, a group of hunter-gatherers who follow the reindeer herds seasonally from Siberia to Scandinavia and back. While V makes up about 50% of mtdna lineages among the Saami, it's genetic diversity is considerably reduced when compared to samples from Western Europe, so this lineages was probably introduced into the Saami only within the past several thousand years.
    Couldn't the higher percentages of haplogroup V in the Skolt Saami and in Cantabria be due to a bottleneck and restricted breeding? I have a slight interest in this haplogroup as it is mine. I do not know if haplogroup V is as common in Malta as in other European locations and I have not seen any Maltese person who has the same haplogroup as I have. My full mtDNA scan by FTDNA has been Genbanked, as far as I can see, there is no other haplogroup V people who share my private SNPs. So what is the current ideas of where and when haplogroup V originated?

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    I am curious when "V women" started showing up in Basque Country. Found this so far: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1378091/
    but looking for more info regarding what the mtDNA make-up of the Basque population was beforehand.

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    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b L2
    MtDNA haplogroup
    HV0e

    Ethnic group
    Central European
    Country: Slovakia



    Dear all, I would be very thankful to anybody for giving me more inforation about HV0e mtDNA. Obviously, I am selfishly asking because this is my motherline DNA and I have been not able to find more detailed information on the net yet, although trying hard :)

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