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Thread: Native phenotypes of Italian villages in Eastern Liguria/NW Toscana

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    Native phenotypes of Italian villages in Eastern Liguria/NW Toscana



    I hope our Ligurian member checks in from time to time. I had promised I would post pictures of people from this eastern Ligurian/NW Tuscany area. The girls whose pictures I have posted all have different, but local surnames. To my eyes, they look very "North Italian". This particular village has a dearth of stereotypically "Med" looking people, while other villages are more "mixed" in terms of phenotype, and others still, particularly toward the coast, have that particular blend of "northern" and "central/southern" phenotypes that for me really define the area. (I think it's just "drift" btw. The people in these villages would undoubtedly be horrified to discover it, but they are probably far more closely "related" than they think.)

    VF (2).jpg


    VF3.jpg
    VF (2).PNG

    VF2.jpg

    VF.jpg
    Last edited by Angela; 20-09-14 at 02:59.


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    Sorry about that...I had to free up some attachment space. The ones in the first post are visible now.

    These are from a village not even two miles away. These are more "mixed" in type, I think...


    B-F.jpg

    This unfortunate haircut again!

    B-A.jpg

    B-T.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Angela; 25-09-14 at 17:12.

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    Sorry again...I'm supposed to have unlimited attachments, but it doesn't seem to be working for the second post! Until it's fixed, some internet pictures from the same village:

    http://www.bagnonemia.com/Arcobaleno...agnone-une.jpg

    http://cdn.scommettionline.com/wp-co...enalotto-2.jpg

    http://www.repubblica.it/2009/08/sez...2216_29090.jpg

    http://i.ytimg.com/vi/H-kdaOg_8rQ/0.jpg

    I’m particularly interested if anyone has any ideas about him. It’s a look that crops up a lot but I’m not sure where one similar could be found in other parts of the world.
    http://blogs.transparent.com/italian...rol-mattia.jpg

    Our "most famous son"...Gigi Buffon. (Half of his ancestry is from the Veneto, however.) His wedding was held in his mother's ancestral frazione.
    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Tr9KyEh2MO...ova+2013_1.jpg

    Sindaco:
    http://www.cittadellaspezia.com/foto...1/19/57021.jpg

    There are some half southern Italian and one half African here, but it gives a good idea of what you'd see at the pool in the summer:
    http://allegati.aicod.it/bagnone/Gio...acampanile.jpg

    Quite a varied bunch for another village of 2,000, I think!

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    I dumped some more attachments to get post number 2 pictures to show up. I'd really appreciate it if someone could fix the attachment function for me.

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    Ed. none of the attachments printed, so I'll have to dump more of the old ones.
    Last edited by Angela; 26-09-14 at 13:47.

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    Some of the older ones:

    B-G.PNGB-G.jpg

    B-D.jpg

    As I mentioned upthread, Gigi Buffon's mother is from our area. She was a champion in the shot put as was his father. His uncle was a soccer player and his sisters played professional volley ball. Obviously, a very fit and athletic family.

    http://sport.sky.it/static/contentim...ffon_getty.jpg
    Last edited by Angela; 26-09-14 at 16:08.

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    Gente di Fivizzano:

    The "provenance", if you will, of the prior people posted is known to me personally because they are from my mother's ancestral villages.

    Here, I know the genealogy of only a few. However, the "Disfida" which they hold once a year is organized like the internationally known Palio of Siena in that to participate you have to have ancestry from certain "quarters". Now, someone with partial southern ancestry might qualify, so some of the younger people may indeed be, and seem to be, of partial southern ancestry. To my "eye" they have, as a whole, more of a "Tuscan" look than is present in some of the other villages, although it is very "mixed" as well. This makes sense since they have been part of Toscana since the time of the early Medici,and don't have the Ligurian roots of some of the villages to their west.

    The drummers, all young men:
    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-J-8LC7Vl8W...0/drummers.jpg

    A lovely horsewoman:
    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-k9AF4kQ96v...1600/horse.jpg

    I may have posted this picture before, but I love it, so I'm going to post it again:
    http://0.tqn.com/y/goeurope/1/S/W/j/..._picture_3.jpg

    The ladies lining up in their finery:
    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-2b4Gad9BhP...600/parade.jpg

    http://www.wanderingitaly.com/graphi...ivizzano-1.jpg

    The world is indeed changing...and sometimes for the better...we now have lady archers.
    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-N8Oc9eYf5p...00/archers.jpg

    Making a joyful noise:
    http://www.wanderingitaly.com/graphi...ivizzano-5.jpg

    The ladies talking about "lady" things:
    http://www.comune.fivizzano.ms.it/in...mery%20017.jpg

    Here is the adorable younger set. One little boy looks to me to have some southern ancestry. They are my absolute favorite thing about these kinds of events. :) I want to take them all home...and then I remember...
    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-4ONFGWs7qR...0/children.jpg
    http://www.wanderingitaly.com/blog/images/160.jpg
    http://0.tqn.com/y/goeurope/1/S/b/j/..._picture_9.jpg
    http://www.wanderingitaly.com/graphi...ivizzano-6.jpg
    http://www.wanderingitaly.com/graphi...ivizzano-4.jpg

    It's hard work:
    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-9vH3W4l0du..._in_parade.jpg

    How burdens used to be carried:
    http://0.tqn.com/y/goeurope/1/U/a/j/..._picture_8.jpg

    Taking a well deserved rest:
    http://www.lanazione.it/polopoly_fs/..._800/image.jpg

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    Liguria is the swarthiest part of North Italy AFAIK.

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    It depends on whose data you use...but this is not a thread about Liguria as a whole. It is about a rather specific region, the Lunigiana to be precise, which has been variously ruled by Liguria and Toscana. You might want to review your Biasutti if you are so interested in the pigmentation data for this area.

    However, such a discussion was not the purpose of this thread. The purpose was to present the rather varied phenotypes of this particular region in response to a prior question/comment.

    I am asking you politely to please not spoil it with disgusting pigmentation wars and other anthrofora nonsense.

    Ed. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/29/BiasuttiMappa.gif

    This isn't to say that I'm not interested in any comments any of you might have about "classifications". Properly done, it might indeed provide some clues as to ancient migrations, which is my real interest.
    Last edited by Angela; 30-09-14 at 19:53.

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    How could I have forgotten to post a picture of Loris Jacopo Bononi of Fivizzano, one of my heroes? He was a giant of a man...the kind of man for whom the phrase "Renaissance man" was created...and a true custodian of history, knowledge and culture. I don't know if we'll see his like again.
    http://files.castellodicastiglionede...0-%20Vieni.JPG

    http://profile.ak.fbcdn.net/hprofile...35396677_n.jpg

    http://files.castellodicastiglionede...3d/LJB%208.JPG

    This is an English language write up about him:
    http://ciaolunigiana.com/loris-jacopo-bononi/

    This is him giving one of his famous talks...I only wish the non-Italian speakers could understand him. Still, even without subtitles, you can see the charisma of the man, I think. He is at his inspiring best at 4:11. He could move you to tears. I owe him so much...
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eb7KIVV7EVs

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    Quote Originally Posted by joeyc View Post
    Liguria is the swarthiest part of North Italy AFAIK.
    It depends on the areas you consider. Villagers from the inland areas have often fair features, quite frequently "reddish" hair (roman historians already noticed that feature in ancient times). Many people have dark hair and blue eyes. People on the coast are often darker (dark hair/dark eyes), but also more mixed with people from other areas (admixture with non ligurians occured even before the industrial era, though it increased a lot during the XXth century with the southern migration). People from Romagna are probably darker, on average, but realizing "who's darker/fairer" is always a long shot IMO.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    I hope our Ligurian member checks in from time to time. I had promised I would post pictures of people from this eastern Ligurian/NW Tuscany area. The girls whose pictures I have posted all have different, but local surnames. To my eyes, they look very "North Italian".
    They're common faces, yes ;)

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    These are from Fosdinovo.

    This is a collection of 45 high resolution, large pictures of the people of Fosdinovo. An aunt of mine moved to the area so I go there all the time. Most of these people look local to me.
    https://plus.google.com/photos/11649...87097701065150

    From an earlier festa:
    The lords and ladies:
    http://www.folclore.it/pics/photo/2_...1462123943.jpg

    The hoi polloi:
    http://www.4routard.com/campermagazi...sdinovo-MS.jpg


    As to my prior posts on this thread, the pictures in posts 1, 2, 3 and 6 are from my maternal villages in the central Lunigiana. For posts 1, 2, and 6, I either know their origins or at least their surnames. (I have dozens of pictures of local people from my maternal villages, but there is a limit to how many attachments I can post.) As I had to start using internet pictures for post number 3 there are some admixed people among them. However, the people in pictures 2, 3, 4, and 5 of post number 3 are locals with very local surnames.

    Post #7 is of people from Fivizzano, as stated, and Post #8 of people from Pontremoli.

    There are difficulties anywhere in central or northern Italy with attempting to do any sort of "anthropological" analysis of phenotypes because of the extensive internal emigration which has occurred. That's why, if you don't know all the details of the family history, surnames are so important, maternal if possible, as well as paternal. Absent this, the best bet is going with organizations which require "local" ancestry. If I had to go with any "paper" or research on the subject, I would go with Livi and Biasutti, as those testees were analyzed before the bulk of the emigration occurred, and it was done on a very local level. My own personal opinion based on the hundreds and hundreds of people I know from both my father's and mother's areas is that those statistics are remarkably accurate for the really "local" people.

    Speaking of my personal pictures, what amazes me is how certain "family" phenotypes persist. We had a reunion this summer of my mother's family. People have emigrated to northern Italy, northern Europe, South America, and the U.S. (few of us). There has obviously been some intermarriage. Yet, many of the "faces" were still recognizable.

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    I know people whose phenotypes pass from mother to daughter to daughter etc (this occurs especially among women, I ignore why). It's amazing. I know two twins, they look identical and they're extremely similar to their mother, and grandmother too...!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mars View Post
    I know people whose phenotypes pass from mother to daughter to daughter etc (this occurs especially among women, I ignore why). It's amazing. I know two twins, they look identical and they're extremely similar to their mother, and grandmother too...!
    I've seen the same thing, but it didn't work quite that way in my family. I look a great deal like my mother, but she took after her father more, who was mostly a Spezzino. However, my maternal grandparents were third cousins, and a lot of the people in these little villages haven't moved anywhere for about five hundred years, so certain phenotypes keep re-cycling if you know what I mean. :) Anyway, this summer I met Argentinian cousins who despite half Spanish (and probably a drop of Amerindian) ancestry, still had our nose, our mouth, our set of the eyes. They must be very dominant genes!

    Oh, and it is continuing through my brother's line as well. His daughter looks more like me than she looks like either of her parents, and his son looks just like my father's Emilian family. My sister-in-law says all she has to show for them is the scar!

    Anyway, speaking of small, isolated villages, these are the people of Zeri, a very small village near Pontremoli, which has perhaps better preserved the ancient genomes of the area near the Emilian border. The village has been so isolated that it was often studied by Italian geneticists, including Professore Francalacci.

    From these pictures you can see how time could forget them. This is the topography:
    http://blogzeri.files.wordpress.com/.../scan10155.jpg

    This is the site of their village:
    https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2045/2...6e9fb5bed3.jpg

    During the war, these people gave some English and other Allied POWs shelter and collaborated in forming a partisan unit. They paid a heavy price...there are little memorials all over the valley to the people they lost during the rastrellamenti. The son of the Commander of the International Brigade owns a house in the valley, and the families of those English soldiers come regularly to the memorial event he hosts every year.
    http://ciaolunigiana.com/rastrellame...o-gordon-lett/

    This is Gordon Lett's son making a very pretty speech in Italian on the occasion of the screening of a documentary film about the Rastrellamento at Arzelato:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w9fqS80ZDEU

    This is a very rare and precious archival picture of the farmers of Zeri from that period. If you expand it as much as possible, you can see them a little better. The books written by Commander Lett's son have some wonderful old pictures of them. If the attachment function ever gets fixed I'll get them uploaded.
    https://blogzeri.files.wordpress.com...0012.jpg?w=500

    This is Gordon Lett and his International Brigade with some of the people of Zeri:
    http://ciaolunigiana.com/wp-content/...44191374_n.jpg

    This is an older man with a very common look up there:
    http://www.erodoto108.com/wp-content...a_12aprile.jpg
    It's a look common on the other side of the Emilia border as well, except for the droop in the nose tip, but then I think that happens to some old people. Ah, old age. I saw a picture of Helen Mirren the other day, and that nose wasn't on her face when she was in her prime!

    This is a pair of older men at a musical "evening" when they play old folk tunes utilizing the "organetto" and bagpipes. They do a very old version of our giga up there too, or at least the old people do...it's just like an Irish jig. Not my favorite dance, but tradition is tradition!
    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/Nef6vXguIQI/mqdefault.jpg

    Here's a you tube of two musicians playing the "Giga di Zeri". Be warned...they're playing bagpipes! (Sorry, Hope)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twyKhg9G0yY

    A man from Zeri runs a very nice blog called Blogzeri, and there are a series of pictures from Cantamaggio on this section of his site:
    https://blogzeri.wordpress.com/tag/musica/

    A short documentary film was made called The Women of Zeri, which is about a small group of women who still keep sheep up there. It's like a time warp...eighteen hour days outdoors in the fields or with the animals. Not for me, but some people find it hard to let go of the past in these little rural places. Now, in my neck of the woods our position and orientation means we can grow olives and grapes. The closer to the Mediterranean the better as far as I'm concerned. Now there I might consider running a vineyard in my retirement...with a lot of help, of course :)

    http://blogzeri.files.wordpress.com/...476_4724_n.jpg
    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-BDL57wlaqo...DSC_6353-6.jpg

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=suiJ9wJ2M

    For all that they've been so isolated, there's not a single cookie cutter look even up there. There's definitely variation even up there.

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    The appennine ridge villages and towns share a common history of relative isolation, and transmission of ancient peasant culture, back from the Middle Ages (or even before) to the edge of our post-modern era. The areas from Piedmont to northern Tuscany, including Liguria and part of Emilia, had a lot in common even before the birth of modern Italy in 1861.
    If you're interested in northern Appennine history and folklore, I strongly reccomend you to take a look at the ethnological studies about the Quattro Province (four provinces), a territory including part of the present provinces of Genoa, Alessandria, Piacenza and Pavia, that share common musical and cultural ancient traditions.
    http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quattro_Province

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Here's a you tube of two musicians playing the "Giga di Zeri". Be warned...they`re playing bagpipes (Sorry,Hope)
    ..I admire your memory Angela....actually I don`t mind these ones.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mars View Post
    The appennine ridge villages and towns share a common history of relative isolation, and transmission of ancient peasant culture, back from the Middle Ages (or even before) to the edge of our post-modern era. The areas from Piedmont to northern Tuscany, including Liguria and part of Emilia, had a lot in common even before the birth of modern Italy in 1861.
    If you're interested in northern Appennine history and folklore, I strongly reccomend you to take a look at the ethnological studies about the Quattro Province (four provinces), a territory including part of the present provinces of Genoa, Alessandria, Piacenza and Pavia, that share common musical and cultural ancient traditions.
    http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quattro_Province

    Thank you Mars...yes, I have done. The people of this region (and their culture) are of great interest to me because my father's entire family for at least the last 500 years comes from villages in these mountains in and between the Val Parma and Val Cedra. I don't think there's much of a difference between them and the people of the "Four Provinces".

    I don't know if you're aware of it, but the history of Italian genetics and it might not be an exaggeration to say the history of population genetics began in those villages. It was there that Luigi Cavalli Sforza collected the blood samples and did the genealogical research that led to his pioneering work in population genetics. It was when, at university, I realized that my people were the basis for this work that I first became interested in the subject.

    Anway, I've posted the music of a group from there in the Italian Folkmusic section. I've heard them in person and really like their music. If you know the people of those regions, their faces may also be familiar to you.

    I present Baraban

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CkBYn-AYULU


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NOyY77xd3l4


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wHc2s9JgVuE

    It's sad and interesting to see how they've aged. The lead singer is almost unrecognizable as time passes...very familiar in both incarnations, however. In fact, as a young man my brother looked just like him, only with reddish hair.

    Hope posted this musician of the Piva. He is apparently known even in Ireland. Alas, I am not sufficiently enamored of bagpipes in any incarnation...nor of the Pifero. Mandolins and guitars, violins and organettos are much more to my liking, although I don't venture that opinion when I brave the mountains to visit family.

    From Hope:
    "Fabio Vetro is a favourite with me , very talented man..[ and a very nice person also]. I particularly like this:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G5B8abc0eAk

    It's a small world, isn't it?

    I haven't yet posted, but will, this song from my father's neck of the woods. The group is called Piva dal Carner:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xX2gErWSzCM

    Believe it or not, a Board member asked about it. He had seen it mentioned in a Rough Guide to Italy of all things!

    Oh, I also posted two trallalero songs. I'm going to transfer them to the Folk music thread as well. Not professionals by any means, just neighborhood people apparently, and not up to the caliber of some of the Corsican groups, in my opinion, but a wonderful tradition which has managed to hang on a bit.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8IhQlfNN-eI

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WyKDvf_MmBo

    Hope...I forget what I went upstairs to get, or what I have to buy at the grocery store, but not these kinds of things. What that says about me I'm not quite sure!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Oh, I also posted two trallalero songs. I'm going to transfer them to the Folk music thread as well. Not professionals by any means, just neighborhood people apparently, and not up to the caliber of some of the Corsican groups, in my opinion, but a wonderful tradition which has managed to hang on a bit.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8IhQlfNN-eI

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WyKDvf_MmBo

    Hope...I forget what I went upstairs to get, or what I have to buy at the grocery store, but not these kinds of things. What that says about me I'm not quite sure!
    Trallalero is the most typical form of popular song in Liguria. Everyone who's born here has heard a trallalero choir, at least once in life. I checked the Wikipedia article about it and I found this, I really didn't know it, amazing:
    In the 1950s, American musicologistAlan Lomax and Diego Carpitella recorded trallalero. Lomax later claimed he was blown away, and called it the most significant work in his long and storied career. Edward Neill worked to revitalize the tradition in the middle of the 20th century.

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    Actually it was this one I posted, Angela...:)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3lIrw5BEpGg


    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Hope...I forget what I went upstairs to get, or what I have to buy at the grocery store, but not these kinds of things. What that says about me I'm not quite sure!
    Angela, I think this has probably happened to us all at some point. What makes it worse is when you go back downstairs, you remember then what it was you went up for and have to make a return journey! I like to think it is the brains way of telling us we need a little exercise......

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    Quote Originally Posted by hope View Post
    Actually it was this one I posted, Angela...:)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3lIrw5BEpGg



    Angela, I think this has probably happened to us all at some point. What makes it worse is when you go back downstairs, you remember then what it was you went up for and have to make a return journey! I like to think it is the brains way of telling us we need a little exercise......
    I just came on here to make the correction because I was getting some info from the other thread and saw that I made a mistake! As I'm a perfectionist, that was deeply upsetting. Ah well, he's a good musician so now we have two links...it's all good as my children say.

    The absolute worst is when you can't remember where you put the list that's supposed to help you remember the list! However, I suppose it's better than not having a list at all, which was my husband's style of shopping. Did I mention that turmeric on fried potatoes is not all that bad? Well, let's say that it's tolerable, but then I never met a potato I didn't like.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mars View Post
    Trallalero is the most typical form of popular song in Liguria. Everyone who's born here has heard a trallalero choir, at least once in life. I checked the Wikipedia article about it and I found this, I really didn't know it, amazing:
    In the 1950s, American musicologistAlan Lomax and Diego Carpitella recorded trallalero. Lomax later claimed he was blown away, and called it the most significant work in his long and storied career. Edward Neill worked to revitalize the tradition in the middle of the 20th century.

    This is a tad off topic, but since it's my thread, I hope I'll be given some leeway.

    I've heard trallalero in La Spezia, but rarely.

    Trallalero, or, more generally, a cappella polyphonic singing, is beloved by laypeople and musicologists throughout the world. The most accomplished performers today are, in my opinion, in Corsica, which, as I'm sure you know, has deep ties with both Liguria and Toscana.

    This is what another musicologist,Dorothy Carrington, wrote about Corsican polyphonic singing:
    the singers, who "...never... feel so united in their apartness, their insularity, as when performing this indigenous music inherited from their unremembered past. Fathers and sons and brothers and cousins stand or crouch in close formation, body to body, ear to ear, linked in the communion of singing with each other, with their race and with the hosts of their ancestors." "I had the impression of hearing a voice from the entrails of the earth. Song from the beginning of the world," she said after hearing singing one Christmas eve in a chapel in the Fiumorbu.

    These are the two examples I posted in a thread on this Board called "Mediterranean Music", which I highly recommend.

    This one is by a group called Barbara Furtuna. I am passionate about them...saw them both in Italy and here in New York, where they were very well received.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tDZuPUA1vNE

    This is another Corsican group singing a Corsican version of the Christe Eleison
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E9Ote3hejqU:


    Alex Lomax deserves a monument. He recorded folk music from all over the world, including 3,000 songs from Italy alone.

    This is just one of his collections of Italian folk music. It’s a sampler. You can preview the songs on ITunes:
    https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/al...lian/id2484996


    Piemonte and Valle D’Aosta:
    https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/it...nte/id20109703

    This is his collection of Trallalero music, the Ligurian specific and unique version of polyphonic singing.
    http://www.allmusic.com/album/italia...a-mw0000666497

    One of the songs is on youtube:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wOlLd4yly7k

    I particularly love how Lomax captured them using their technique to sing “In The Mood”. America made its influence felt even there.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FUA3-phWIzg
    This clip has great footage and stills of American service people as well as the dock workers of Genova.
    Starting at 3:00 you can see the performers. (See, it still has to do with phenotypes!)

    There are collections from his work from Naples, Calabria, Sicily etc.


    If you are interested in traditional Italian music, you might want to take a look at the Discography of Christine Pluhar’s L’Arpeggiata group. All of her “albums” feature traditional Italian music and she has done two complete albums of Monteverdi.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%27Arpeggiata

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    Back in topic, how would you define the people you posted, "typologically"? I mean, according to old anthropology typology theory. I'm not even sure it actually makes sense though, but it seems some features actually appear in different people according to some sort of "scheme" (e.g. a long head associated to a narrow face).

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    Mars, if you'll permit me, I'm going to post my last series, and then I'll address your question, and hope that we, and other members, can discuss them.

    These are pictures of local people of Sarzana and LaSpezia, which are part of Liguria politically, but have always been genetically and culturally, in my opinion, part of the territory of “Luni”.


    (The people or their histories are either known to me or, at the least, their surnames are unmistakably local and, in some cases, limited to these two areas specifically.


    (His surname, Vistori, exists only in La Spezia, to my knowledge, and he has a totally local face.)

    http://www.beppegrillo.it/listecivic...81486129_n.jpg

    Fiasella-a surname only found in La Spezia and Massa Carrara

    http://static.8100.corriereobjects.i...agini/7217.jpg

    Ravecca-a totally local name and a totally local face:

    http://static.8100.corriereobjects.i...ini/540772.jpg

    Andrea Calevo, son of a prominent family in LaSpezia…the victim of a terrible kidnapping:
    http://notizie.tiscali.it/media/14/04/calevo100.jpg

    Caleo:

    http://www.sarzanachebotta.org/wp-co.../02/caleo6.jpg

    Valettini-a few offshoots down the coast in Toscana, but basically a La Spezia and Lunigiana name

    http://iltirreno.gelocal.it/polopoly_fs/1.2372389.1322782725!/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_250/image.jpg

    Zanotti-a common name among us, but common all over northern Italy:

    http://static.8100.corriereobjects.i...ini/540772.jpg

    Destri-

    http://www.pdsarzana.it/upload/image...segretario.jpg

    Barontini-This is a surname present in La Spezia, but the majority of the people who bear that name are in Toscana proper, with offshoots in Umbria and Le Marche
    http://old.comune.sarzana.sp.it/citt..._Anelito_1.jpg

    Michelucci-Another common name, but with Tuscan roots:

    http://static.8100.corriereobjects.i...ini/249142.jpg
    (I do love the way that so many Tuscans look so distinctly and uniquely Italian.)

    Accorsi-Again, this is a surname present in LaSpezia, but it is basically a name from the Romagna it seems to me:

    http://static.8100.corriereobjects.i...ini/703224.jpg

    Some participants at local events who have very “local” faces:

    http://www.sarzanasenzatempo.com/wp-content/gallery/edizione-2010/27.jpg



    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-sMfaksAAhz8/UknD5lkxfnI/AAAAAAAAAYw/RVcEZ0EM1Mk/s1600/IMG_1086.JPG



    http://www.lunigiana.net/magia/images/magia_102.jpg

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