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Thread: Gene Loss Creates Eating Disorder- Related Behaviour In Mice.

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    Elite member hope's Avatar
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    Gene Loss Creates Eating Disorder- Related Behaviour In Mice.

    Micheal Lutter MD, PhD. is known for research regarding the relationship between psychiatric disorders and metabolic diseases.
    In a previous study he and fellow researchers at the University of Iowa discovered a gene linked to eating disorders.
    Now, in a new study they have shown how the loss of the gene in mice, can lead to behavioural abnormalities which resemble those seen in humans with anorexia nervosa.
    Working with genetically engineered mice, it was shown that mice lacking the estrogen-related receptor alpha gene [ESRRA] were less motivated to search out high-fat foods when hungry and also showed signs of abnormal social interactions.
    Null ESRRA female mice also showed signs of obsessive compulsive like behaviours.
    The study also showed ESRRA levels are controlled by energy status and that restricting calorie intake over several days raises the ESRRA in the brain of normal mice.
    Decreased calorie intake usually motivates animals, including humans to search out high calorie food. The finding shows the loss of ESRRA may disrupt this function.


    When the team selectively removed the gene from the orbitofrontal cortex, it produced increased obsessive compulsive type disorders in the female mice [ twitchy and compulsive over grooming.] When it was removed from the prefrontal cortex, it produced mice who were less willing to search out high-fat foods when hungry.
    Lutter said, "Mouse models of human neuropsychiatric illnesses are useful for identifying cellular and molecular abnormalities that might contribute to illnesses like eating disorders".

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0409133515.htm


    Here is a piece regarding Lutters study on genes and related eating disorders.

    http://now.uiowa.edu/2013/10/two-gen...ting-disorders
    Last edited by hope; 12-04-15 at 01:37.

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    'If you don't use it you lose it' might describe gene loss very well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by oriental View Post
    'If you don't use it you lose it' might describe gene loss very well.
    If you don't have a gene to start with, how can you use it, not mentioning losing it?
    Be wary of people who tend to glorify the past, underestimate the present, and demonize the future.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hope View Post
    Micheal Lutter MD, PhD. is known for research regarding the relationship between psychiatric disorders and metabolic diseases.
    In a previous study he and fellow researchers at the University of Iowa discovered a gene linked to eating disorders.
    Now, in a new study they have shown how the loss of the gene in mice, can lead to behavioural abnormalities which resemble those seen in humans with anorexia nervosa.
    Working with genetically engineered mice, it was shown that mice lacking the estrogen-related receptor alpha gene [ESRRA] were less motivated to search out high-fat foods when hungry and also showed signs of abnormal social interactions.
    Null ESRRA female mice also showed signs of obsessive compulsive like behaviours.
    The study also showed ESRRA levels are controlled by energy status and that restricting calorie intake over several days raises the ESRRA in the brain of normal mice.
    Decreased calorie intake usually motivates animals, including humans to search out high calorie food. The finding shows the loss of ESRRA may disrupt this function.


    When the team selectively removed the gene from the orbitofrontal cortex, it produced increased obsessive compulsive type disorders in the female mice [ twitchy and compulsive over grooming.] When it was removed from the prefrontal cortex, it produced mice who were less willing to search out high-fat foods when hungry.
    Lutter said, "Mouse models of human neuropsychiatric illnesses are useful for identifying cellular and molecular abnormalities that might contribute to illnesses like eating disorders".

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0409133515.htm


    Here is a piece regarding Lutters study on genes and related eating disorders.

    http://now.uiowa.edu/2013/10/two-gen...ting-disorders
    Eating behavior will be a poly-genetic trait in people, I guess. Therefore it will be hell of a job to narrow it down to one gene or even couple to find similarity with mice. However, I have a feeling that anorexia will turn out to be mostly genetic disease.

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    Quote Originally Posted by oriental View Post
    'If you don't use it you lose it' might describe gene loss very well.
    We certainly have lost genes on our way to adapting to what we are to-day, oriental.
    However we can lose activity from a gene that is actually being used...and this is not always a bad thing. Think of Caspase-12 just for one example. With it`s inactivation it gave us a better response to fight off bacterial infection. It came about in populations that would have experienced more infectious diseases as population sizes were growing..big benefit to us..:)

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    Quote Originally Posted by LeBrok View Post
    Eating behavior will be a poly-genetic trait in people, I guess. Therefore it will be hell of a job to narrow it down to one gene or even couple to find similarity with mice. However, I have a feeling that anorexia will turn out to be mostly genetic disease.
    Well I agree with this LeBrok. For the greater part, anorexia nervosa does seem to run in families and there will likely be a number of genetic factors relating to it...finding them will, as you say, be no small task. I think the work being done here by those such as Lutter very impressive.
    However, regarding those who have this illness by way of social factors, I think trying to find a solution to that will be no small task either.
    Last edited by hope; 13-04-15 at 01:36.

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