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View Poll Results: What is your favorite Germanic language?

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  • Dutch (Nederlands, Flemish)

    3 5.56%
  • Frisian

    1 1.85%
  • Afrikaans

    0 0%
  • English

    18 33.33%
  • Scots (Lallans, Lowland Scots)

    2 3.70%
  • Low German (Plattdeutsch)

    1 1.85%
  • High German (Hochdeutsch, Standard German, Swiss German)

    11 20.37%
  • Yiddish

    0 0%
  • Danish

    2 3.70%
  • Icelandic

    6 11.11%
  • Norwegian Bokmal

    3 5.56%
  • Norwegian Nynorsk

    0 0%
  • Swedish

    2 3.70%
  • Faroese

    1 1.85%
  • Other living West Germanic language (specify)

    1 1.85%
  • Other living North Germanic language (specify)

    0 0%
  • An extinct Germanic language (specify)

    3 5.56%
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Results 51 to 57 of 57

Thread: What's your favorite Germanic language?

  1. #51
    Regular Member Alcuin's Avatar
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    Country: UK - England



    1 members found this post helpful.
    Being biased, I have to say English. A Yorkshire accent is the best accent, and even better if it's truly dialectal

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sB3ieNhEsDY

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ScELaXMCVis

    I'm not sure why German gets such a bad name, I think it's quite beautiful to listen to. Perhaps it's because they're less bothered about telling everyone else how wonderful their language is (something that in my experience seems to be a peculiarly-Romance trait)? Dutch is hideous though. I also like Icelandic, and Danish can be pleasant enough to listen to. Swedish and Norwegian have an unusual intonation that I find off-putting.

  2. #52
    Seasonal Member Minty's Avatar
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    I vote for Luxembourgish.
    I found this information online:

    "Highland" German), out of which developed Standard German, Yiddish and Luxembourgish. It refers to the Central Uplands (Mittelgebirge) and Alpine areas of central and southern Germany; it also includes Luxembourg, Austria, Liechtenstein and most of Switzerland.

    So, it is considered as high german. You learn new things everyday, ha-ha.
    l'audace de vivre le présent avec optimisme tout en construisant l'avenir avec créativité

  3. #53
    Regular Member hrvclv's Avatar
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    Country: France



    1 members found this post helpful.
    It is therefore worth while to search out the bounds between opinion and knowledge; and examine by what measures, in things whereof we have no certain knowledge, we ought to regulate our assent and moderate our persuasion. (John Locke)

  4. #54
    Junior Member
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    Country: Norway



    I voted Icelandic. The grammar feels organised and logical to me, although there are many exceptions. Initially, I thought it would be the granddaddy of Nordic languages, and that learning Icelandic would help with Danish/Norwegian/Swedish but it seems very remote, although some words seem to overlap. I have sort of given up on learning Icelandic at the moment, it's like banging your head against a brick wall. Instead, I am learning Norwegian now and it's a joy, it's so much easier and I can see progress in terms of grammar and vocabulary. By the way, I remember my Dutch teacher in high school saying that Danish was a doddle when you knew Dutch - maybe he had a point.

  5. #55
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    Country: France



    Quote Originally Posted by Joey D View Post
    Just returning to this (been on holiday!), I too have old Dutch texts which differentiate between both sounds: one being voiced and the other being unvoiced - and I can recall being confused by this because they both sounded the same to my ear, and my Dutch friends later confirming that as far as they were concerned, it was the same sound - so somewhere along the line, if they were two different sounds, they have come together.



    To be honest, being familiar with the sound myself, I can't for the life of me imagine how you can possibly make a voiced version of the sound.
    It was maybe more a question of articular energy than one of to be voiced or not, I think.

  6. #56
    Regular Member
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    Country: Canada



    Definitely Dutch!

  7. #57
    Regular Member
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    Country: Portugal



    English! it's the only one I know well, besides some words of German lol

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