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Thread: Female Infertility

  1. #1
    Flagmaker of Haplogroups MtDNA's Avatar
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    Question Female Infertility

    Are there any genetic mutations known to cause female infertility.

    All of the women in my paternal line, going back many generations, were infertile. Has anyone ever heard of such a case before? Where can that infertility mutation that affects only women, and is somehow passed to every son and daughter, be located?
    Also, please share your infertility stories.

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    Advisor LeBrok's Avatar
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    I'm sure there are/will be discovered tens if not hundreds of genes affecting infertility. Many things can go wrong in man and woman in this regard.
    Be wary of people who tend to glorify the past, underestimate the present, and demonize the future.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MtDNA View Post
    Are there any genetic mutations known to cause female infertility.

    All of the women in my paternal line, going back many generations, were infertile. Has anyone ever heard of such a case before? Where can that infertility mutation that affects only women, and is somehow passed to every son and daughter, be located?
    Also, please share your infertility stories.
    There is some evidence that female mutations of the vulvar can create infertility .................maybe a reason of low numbers of people among muslim ( my thoughts)( a form of birth control , maybe ?)
    có che un pòpoło no 'l defende pi ła só łéngua el xe prónto par èser s'ciavo

    when a people no longer dares to defend its language it is ripe for slavery.

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    I think the Shah of Iran divorced his first wife Suraiya because of infertility. With so many restrictions on women in Islamic countries somehow it could be a factor in creating an unfavorable environment for women to have babies.

    American men also have this infertility issue. Maybe it is the tight jeans they wear according to some doctors as warm genital areas somehow affect the sperm quality and quantity.

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    Flagmaker of Haplogroups MtDNA's Avatar
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    Every woman with my last name, in the same paternal line, is infertile. The mutation cannot be in autosomal DNA, nor XY dna. Is there any extrochromosomal gene-encoding DNA packet that is always transferred from father to child?

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    Quote Originally Posted by MtDNA View Post
    Every woman with my last name, in the same paternal line, is infertile. The mutation cannot be in autosomal DNA, nor XY dna. Is there any extrochromosomal gene-encoding DNA packet that is always transferred from father to child?
    It can be autosomal. Half of autosomal DNA comes from father, 25% from his father, 12.5% from his father and so on. A bad autosomal gene can linger around through good few generations.

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    Flagmaker of Haplogroups MtDNA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeBrok View Post
    It can be autosomal. Half of autosomal DNA comes from father, 25% from his father, 12.5% from his father and so on. A bad autosomal gene can linger around through good few generations.
    Then how come it is tranfered to all children? If it was autosomal, it could only come from one parent, the father, since women with it are infertile. That would mean any carrier male would be heterozygous. Only half of his daughter would be affected, and half of his sons would be carriers.

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    Advisor LeBrok's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MtDNA View Post
    Then how come it is tranfered to all children? If it was autosomal, it could only come from one parent, the father, since women with it are infertile. That would mean any carrier male would be heterozygous. Only half of his daughter would be affected, and half of his sons would be carriers.
    Statistically half, but for a small number of kids all could inherit the gene. It would be true for a huge statistical number, hundreds or thousands, but not for few descendants. For example you can throw number 6 with a dice few times in a row, though there are 5 more numbers on it. Sort of bad luck combination.
    Other explanation that came to mind is that if your family lived in a small village, there could have been already many women and men carrying this faulty gene. In this case some of autosomal, or X chromosome could have come from female part of family and sometimes from male. Muddying the picture a bit.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LeBrok View Post
    Statistically half, but for a small number of kids all could inherit the gene. It would be true for a huge statistical number, hundreds or thousands, but not for few descendants. For example you can throw number 6 with a dice few times in a row, though there are 5 more numbers on it. Sort of bad luck combination.
    Other explanation that came to mind is that if your family lived in a small village, there could have been already many women and men carrying this faulty gene. In this case some of autosomal, or X chromosome could have come from female part of family and sometimes from male. Muddying the picture a bit.
    My father's family are Heinz 57s. They marry women from many ethnic groups and locations. This infertility is found from as far back as can be traced. My dad's female paternal cousins and aunts all had it. His family is too large for this transmission pattern to merely be a coincidence. In my immediate paternal line, I have 8 female cousins and two aunts. If you exclude the ones that never married and never tried to become pregnant, out of the 7 women that have wanted a child all are confirmed infertile. For statistical simplicity, lets assume that the mutation was on an autosomal chromosome, and lets assume that all fathers are heterozygous. the probably of such a situation occuring is (1/2)^7=1/128 which is less than 0.8%. That's when you don't take into account the transmission probability to each uncle. If you include all my second cousins, the probability would decrease even further.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MtDNA View Post
    My father's family are Heinz 57s. They marry women from many ethnic groups and locations. This infertility is found from as far back as can be traced. My dad's female paternal cousins and aunts all had it. His family is too large for this transmission pattern to merely be a coincidence. In my immediate paternal line, I have 8 female cousins and two aunts. If you exclude the ones that never married and never tried to become pregnant, out of the 7 women that have wanted a child all are confirmed infertile. For statistical simplicity, lets assume that the mutation was on an autosomal chromosome, and lets assume that all fathers are heterozygous. the probably of such a situation occuring is (1/2)^7=1/128 which is less than 0.8%. That's when you don't take into account the transmission probability to each uncle. If you include all my second cousins, the probability would decrease even further.
    Are you suggesting it is a spiritual matter?

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    Flagmaker of Haplogroups MtDNA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeBrok View Post
    Are you suggesting it is a spiritual matter?
    What do you mean?

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    Quote Originally Posted by MtDNA View Post
    What do you mean?
    You seem excluded genetic side of it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sile View Post
    There is some evidence that female mutations of the vulvar can create infertility .................maybe a reason of low numbers of people among muslim ( my thoughts)( a form of birth control , maybe ?)
    of the 29000 women studied in 2006 with female mutilation and where pregnant, there was found an extra 2% of stillborns compared to women without mutilation

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    Wikipedia on female infertility.

    I wonder if wearing a black burka created a very warm tent thus affecting pregnancy. After all heat affect men's sperm.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Female_infertility

  15. #15
    Regular Member Sile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oriental View Post
    Wikipedia on female infertility.

    I wonder if wearing a black burka created a very warm tent thus affecting pregnancy. After all heat affect men's sperm.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Female_infertility
    Heat players a role in infertility, example a man's testicles lower and raise depending on the temperate, they regulate themselves so its not too hot or not too cold.

    A woman only has 6 days a month when she can get impregnated, but if she is too rugged up and her bodytemperature is too hot , a high percentage of sperm will die when entering the woman. the only chance for sperm to survive ( if the woman is to hot in body temperature ) is for a woman to get an orgasm as the sperm enters, this triples the speed of the sperm to find an egg ( the sperm will either head to the left or right part of the woman's body to find an egg, it will never split ).

    to conclude it is far better for the woman to be semi naked or naked to have a better chance of pregnancy ( this is the method to cool her body and not overheat the sperm )

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