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Thread: Origins, admixture and founder lineages in European Roma

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    Origins, admixture and founder lineages in European Roma

    Origins, admixture and founder lineages in European Roma
    http://www.researchgate.net/publicat..._European_Roma

    "The Roma, also known as Gypsies, represent the largest and the most widespread ethnic minority of Europe. There is increasing evidence, based on linguistic, anthropological and genetic data, to suggest that they originated from the Indian subcontinent, with subsequent bottlenecks and undetermined gene flow from/to hosting populations during their diaspora. Further support comes from the presence of Indian uniparentally inherited lineages, such as mitochondrial DNA M and Y-chromosome Haplogroups, in a significant number of Roma individuals. However, the limited resolution of most genetic studies so far, together with the restriction of the samples used, have prevented the detection of other non-Indian founder lineages that might have been present in the proto-Roma population. We performed a high-resolution study of the uniparental genomes of 753 Roma and 984 non-Roma hosting European individuals. Roma groups show lower genetic diversity and high heterogeneity compared with non-Roma samples as a result of lower effective population size and extensive drift, consistent with a series of bottlenecks during their diaspora. We found a set of founder lineages, present in the Roma and virtually absent in the non-Roma, for the maternal (H7, J1b3, J1c1, M18, M35b, M5a1, U3, and X2d) and paternal (I-P259, J-M92, and J-M67) genomes. This lineage classfication allows us to identify extensive gene flow from non-Roma to Roma groups, whereas the opposite pattern, although not negligible, is substantially lower (up to 6.3%). Finally, the exact haplotype matching analysis of both uniparental lineages consistently points to a Northwestern origin of the proto-Roma population within the Indian subcontinent."


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    Y-DNA haplogroup
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Origins, admixture and founder lineages in European Roma
    http://www.researchgate.net/publicat..._European_Roma

    "The Roma, also known as Gypsies, represent the largest and the most widespread ethnic minority of Europe. There is increasing evidence, based on linguistic, anthropological and genetic data, to suggest that they originated from the Indian subcontinent, with subsequent bottlenecks and undetermined gene flow from/to hosting populations during their diaspora. Further support comes from the presence of Indian uniparentally inherited lineages, such as mitochondrial DNA M and Y-chromosome Haplogroups, in a significant number of Roma individuals. However, the limited resolution of most genetic studies so far, together with the restriction of the samples used, have prevented the detection of other non-Indian founder lineages that might have been present in the proto-Roma population. We performed a high-resolution study of the uniparental genomes of 753 Roma and 984 non-Roma hosting European individuals. Roma groups show lower genetic diversity and high heterogeneity compared with non-Roma samples as a result of lower effective population size and extensive drift, consistent with a series of bottlenecks during their diaspora. We found a set of founder lineages, present in the Roma and virtually absent in the non-Roma, for the maternal (H7, J1b3, J1c1, M18, M35b, M5a1, U3, and X2d) and paternal (I-P259, J-M92, and J-M67) genomes. This lineage classfication allows us to identify extensive gene flow from non-Roma to Roma groups, whereas the opposite pattern, although not negligible, is substantially lower (up to 6.3%). Finally, the exact haplotype matching analysis of both uniparental lineages consistently points to a Northwestern origin of the proto-Roma population within the Indian subcontinent."
    What!?! Take a look at all those J1c1's and H7's. These two haplogroups are very common in non-Roma. I've read multiple threads on each at 23andMe and read dozens of posts that discussed what people with J1c1 and H7 knew about their maternal lineages. Also, J1c1 shows up on Jean Manco's page in Neolithic Hungary and Copper Age Spain. J1c even more frequently. This research project had limited sampling that is not representative of Europe as a whole.

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    Quote Originally Posted by elghund View Post
    What!?! Take a look at all those J1c1's and H7's. These two haplogroups are very common in non-Roma. I've read multiple threads on each at 23andMe and read dozens of posts that discussed what people with J1c1 and H7 knew about their maternal lineages. Also, J1c1 shows up on Jean Manco's page in Neolithic Hungary and Copper Age Spain. J1c even more frequently. This research project had limited sampling that is not representative of Europe as a whole.
    They didn't mean that these lineages came with them from the Punjab.They specifically state that the only mtDna lineage from India among the Roma is "M".

    From what I can see it appears that H7 can be found in both West Asia and Europe. I don't know about J1c. Perhaps you have some information on that?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haplog....2C_H7_and_H13

    If that's the case, they could have picked them up on their way through the Near East (the migration went through Persia and Armenia) or in the Balkans. They would still be "founding lineages".

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