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Thread: When could possibly Ugrofinians have come to Europe?

  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by werner View Post
    And what for a population spoken paleosibirian like Ket?
    Your genetic list is not correct, Ket-People had Haplogroup N and Q from mongolian invasion and asiatic R1b from hunnic invasion and lot more. The point is, N is a child of NO*-Group and the Language is connect to a language of O-Speaker from Tibet. They wandering with her language along sibiria about the route of jenissey river to north europe. It seems Ket is the origin language of Haplogroup N, not Uralic. Uralic was addopted by N from local population at Ural mountains.
    But when it is true, what for a group had spoken uralic?

    Ket is related to Na-Dene language group in N America. Na-Dene doesn't have N yDNA, but just like Ket - both share Q yDNA. I have no idea, if Na-Dene has any relations with Nostratic languages, but currently it is not even considered to be related to Uralic at all! Ket are american indians, who stayed in Siberia. Probably up till recent most of Siberia was populated by Q, as N spread in Siberia probably when Ice age ended and Beringia vanished, so at max 11 000(in East Siberia it might be more like ~5000) years ago, because most of the Siberia was either ice or sea-sized lakes.

    Ancient Tibet has D yDNA, that was replaced by O yDNA 5000(or 3000) years ago - also modern invaders, who are now Tibetians replaced ancient religion with new in process.

    Siberian/European N originated on Liao River first.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xinglongwa_culture 6200-5400BC - Oldest Comb ceramic sample(in China)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xinle_culture 5500-4800BC
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zhaobaogou_culture 5400-4500BC Oldest Jade dragon(in China)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hongshan_culture 4700-2900BC

    European cultures:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kama_culture 5300-3300
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pit%E2...b_Ware_culture 4200-2000BC

    It seems, that they did more than wandering, but built civilization and before Near East civilizations made pottery. As for language - Yukaghir is also Paleosiberian language and shows similarities with Uralic, as a Uralic-Yukhagir language group.
    Last edited by laint; 05-09-18 at 20:15.

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tomenable View Post
    Eskimos are not very indigenous to their lands. For example, Eskimos came to Greenland later than Vikings.

    Eskimos represented the Thule culture and they replaced previous native inhabitants - the Dorset culture:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorset_culture

    Maps:

    Dorset people = green
    Vikings = dark red
    Eskimos = dark blue

    It is really misleading, to claim, that innuit were not that very(what kind of level even is it?) indigenous... because most of pre-innuit population that was not killed was absorbed, so how that even makes them not indigenous anymore? They have same Q y-dna as rest of american indians - it might even be that these cultures were more related to each other than rest of american indigenous population, so what's the point of of calling them less indigenous? As I understand, then innuit/yupik were travelling back and forth across Bering strait, before they settled in America and were assimilated in Siberia.

    PS There exist also Pre-Dorset culture... that was replaced by Dorset culture, obviously.

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