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Thread: Italians of the Diaspora

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    It's odd. I don't understand the men supposedly speaking Bergamesco all that well, but I understand both the nonna here and her interviewer quite well, and she's supposedly speaking a Veneto dialect.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gASt0urMNDM
    I saw this video years ago, and saved it. :)
    Angela, you're too kind for recognizing, but I guess I was screwing up your another thread. It's about Appennino, not Rio Grande do Sul. So I continue here. :)

    The only portuguese word the nonna talked was "querido" (caro; dear). Well, in fact she didn't talk that much, and didn't build many sentences, while the interviewer - with a huge Brazilian accent btw - did very basic questions. Perhaps it explains why you got it better? In the scenic piece, on the other hand, there was a more fluent conversation. Anyway, that's a version almost 150 years old of "Venetian", or "Venezian", if you prefer, be it a dialect or a language (particularly, I'm not so worry about it). :)
    A maternal uncle said he talked in Venetian to some actual Venetians in his trip to NE Italy much time ago, and that they said: "hey, you talk like my grandparents". :) Still, actual Venetians apparently understand well Talian, and vice-versa. See for example the video I posted previously on this thread, showing an actual Venetian girl interviewing a "Venetian" from South Brazil.

    My godfather, a Luthier born in Spresiano-TV, used to say there were roughly two kind of "Venetians", referring to dialects/languages: the one from countryside, with all its variations, and the one more, say, "cult", comparatively less different from Italian (after all, Venezian would have been heavily influenced by Italian/Tuscan in ~1500s). He said he didn't mixed up Venezian and Italian, at all. But I remember he and my godmother - virtually a "saint" woman; may God have her -, from Treviso-TV, talked to each other in Italian, always, and never in Venezian.
    He loved to visit my relatives in countryside and talk to them in (an adapted) "Italian".

    As for that supposed bergamasc, well, I'm not sure what it is. I assume it's an actual (old) bergamasch (perhaps with some influence of Venetian and Portuguese), because I didn't understand almost anything. But I assure you it's not portuguese, despite some portuguese words poping up. :)

    Nice music. La Bella Polenta is one of the "most popular" musics of my own folks, together with La Bella Violeta, Quel Mazzolin di Fiori, Merica Merica and others.

    Quote Originally Posted by Regio X View Post
    I do know that many were disappointed (the propaganda in Italy was exaggerated). Still, some immigrants, satisfied, did send letters to relatives in Italy stimulating migrations; my guess is that sometimes they were absolutely sincere, and other times, still with good intentions, they were possibly distracted or induced by the fact they simply missed their folks. There were also letters of regret. It depends. So, some were really satisfied, some were not exactly happy but didn't want to go back for some reason, and some did want to return, as a mother-in-law's great-grandmother, just for example.
    Check this video. It talks about those who were happy and those who were not:
    https://youtu.be/WUHyIdeW5ZI

    The situation must have been like this in Italy:
    https://youtu.be/6-UfhwtOk2E

    ah ah ah ah
    Unfortunately the video missed the part the mafiosi give them some money before going away. :)
    Last edited by Regio X; 19-04-19 at 18:31.

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    When my Nana was young, she said her grandparents-both born and raised in Sicily-spoke Greek, but I have been skeptical of that, given that the Greek speaking part of the island is in the east and they were from the west, near Palermo. I rather believe they spoke Albanian; the Arbereshe community of Piana degli Albanesi (which was once called Piana dei Greci, 'Plain of the Greeks') is quite near Palermo. Also my great-grandfather was rather tall for someone of Mediterranean descent, save for someone with Dinaric roots, like an Albanian. My Nana, though, is the stereotypical short Mediterranean woman, I love her, she thinks I'm tall, I'm 5'9".

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    To my knowledge, the last Greek speaking areas in Sicily were in Siracusa and Trapani, but even there I think the "turn" came a couple of centuries ago.


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    @Regio,
    Yes, all the dialects have changed since the advent of television, in particular, which had a great "leveling" effect. Sicilian Americans also tell me that when they go to Sicily they are told that they speak the dialect of not just grandparents, but great-grandparents. :)

    People don't realize it, but even Tuscans have dialects within themselves, and different rules of pronunciation. They don't all introduce that "h" sound, for example. For example, some do say "ubriaca", not "ubriaha". :)

    Fiorentino doc. :)


    This is a fun video with local speakers highlighting the different "dialects" or "languages" of Italy. As I found when listening to Regio's videos, I find Veneto quite understandable, as is Emiliano, of course. It may have been different in the past. In the map they show Emiliano in parts of the Lunigiana, and Tuscan in the rest. It's very locale specific. Pontremoli, imo, is much more Emilian, Zeri a bit Ligurian, and Fivizzano really Tuscan. Where I was born and raised, and where my father was raised as well, despite his roots and being born in Sarzana, there's more of an influence from Tuscany, of the Lucca and Carrara and Pisa variety, than there is of Liguria, despite it being literally just over the border, but not as much so as Fivizzano. If I didn't know it myself, I'd know it from the reaction I get in other parts of Italy. Attentive waiters or owners of restaurants often bring me, without my asking, Vin Santo and cantuccini after dinner, and I hear the maids saying "La Tosca". :) That's what my father's Emilian family called my mother when they'd go up the mountains to see them. I used to get a little annoyed, to be honest. Fwiw, when we're in the north they often don't think my husband is Italian, partly, I'm sure, because he speaks only in English, but it REALLY aggravates him. Turn about is fair play. They don't think I'm local in the south, either. :)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qEEPyE-nR58

    I basically sound like this, although in a lower register. :)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4PtAFlkKs_k

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    @Angela
    Thanks for the explanations on the languages of your area. It amazes me how each area, sometimes little, has its own distinctiveness. Also, political borders don't necessarily correspond to languages/dialects borders, as you described. It's like the area of Caneva-PN and Sacile-PN, for example, where a kind of Venetian is used, rather than Friulan.
    Very interesting the work of Stefano R. Galli. Bravo! The video on languages and dialects is great too. The regional differences we know, including genetical, seems roughly correlate to some different languages/dialects, sometimes in a pronounced way.
    So, you seem to speak the "standard"; right? The girl in the video reminded me how standard Italian is beautiful. Imo the most beautiful in the worId, I must say.
    I still remember the first sentence in Italian I learned much, much time ago, with my godfather: "È libero questo posto per favore?" ah ah
    I have ancestors from an area known by its Vin Santo as well. It's the Vin Santo di Fregona. :)

    Regarding looking local... As I was saying - I guess you saw my comment before I deleted it, but no problem :) -, my father and brother were in Italy in 2013, in occasion of the 200 years of birth of Verdi and Wagner. The presentations were in Verona and Milano, if my memory serves. Anyway, they commented my father was seen as local, while my brother looked foreign. My father does seem Italian imo (if not Italy, then Balkans). They thought my brother came from North, probably distracted by some traits, unimportant in isolation (as height, very light eyes etc. etc.). I bet people like you would easily identify him as Italian. As I already said, I'm not knowledgeble on this, but he seems to belong to a "Dinaric" type, rather than to a Northern one, as per his skull shape, nose... Anyway...
    My sis, on the other hand, must have the most Italian looking of family, and Italian even for those who don't understand too much about phenotypes. So she fits perhaps even in stereotypes. I still remember an event much time ago in Italian embassy... My mother, sis and I were seated there waiting the beginning of the event, and then an old Italian "mamma" came handing a schedule, looked to us, pointed to her and said: you ARE Italian. je je je

    Quote Originally Posted by Regio X View Post
    Check this video. It talks about those who were happy and those who were not:
    https://youtu.be/WUHyIdeW5ZI

    The situation must have been like this in Italy:
    https://youtu.be/6-UfhwtOk2E

    ah ah ah ah
    Unfortunately the video missed the part the mafiosi give them some money before going away. :)
    Funny also the part (Bud) mixed up Garibaldi and General Custer. ah ah
    Fwiw, while Garibaldi, The Hero of Two Worlds, tried to unify Italy, in Brazil he tried the independence of Rio Grande do Sul. je je je Didn't work. Still, he's a regional "hero" there, as one of the three leaders of Farrapos' War (Guerra dos Farrapos), or Revolução Farroupilha (Farroupilha Revolution) - the longest of its kind in Brazilian soil -, together with Bento Gonçalves and David Canabarro, between 1835-1845 (so before Italian immigration). There are in Rio Grande do Sul cities with the names of these three generals, two of them heavily settled by North Italians, as Garibaldi-RS and Bento Gonçalves-RS. Just out of curiosity.

    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    The musical tradition also inspired his soul. :) Verdi is a religion there, as Puccini is in neighboring Toscana. They love opera too.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lkzGOF3COYo
    I guess we were ruining the thread on dairy consumption and height, so here we go... :)

    I agree, but I meant the culinary traditional inspired his belly. lol Just kidding! Love Pavarotti.

    Watched the BBC video, Angela. Simply great!

    As for the other video... Whenever I stay a while without listening Va Pensiero, when I do it again, I shiver. It's really touching, even coming from Andre Rieu. :) No offense. It's not bad, but while he plays an important role in popularizing classicals, I still prefer the traditional, by far. So it's your time to shive: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e1JkhNOcXGo
    And this is for your moments of nostalgia, when missing Italy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OHkri8ZUqOA :)

    Still regarding the dairy consumption and height etc., here's the proof of the role of genetics on physical traits, ah ah: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ey7-KlgD5g

    Quote Originally Posted by Regio X View Post
    Love coffee btw. Here the traditional is boiled, but I also drink espresso - generally Nespresso.
    To finish, I must say I loved the espresso and the capuccino from USA, but their boiled coffee sucks imo. Looks like dirty water, or tea at best.
    coffee.jpg

    Cheers!


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    Quote Originally Posted by Regio X View Post
    @Angela
    Thanks for the explanations on the languages of your area. It amazes me how each area, sometimes little, has its own distinctiveness. Also, political borders don't necessarily correspond to languages/dialects borders, as you described. It's like the area of Caneva-PN and Sacile-PN, for example, where a kind of Venetian is used, rather than Friulan.
    Very interesting the work of Stefano R. Galli. Bravo! The video on languages and dialects is great too. The regional differences we know, including genetical, seems roughly correlate to some different languages/dialects, sometimes in a pronounced way.
    So, you seem to speak the "standard"; right? The girl in the video reminded me how standard Italian is beautiful. Imo the most beautiful in the worId, I must say.
    I still remember the first sentence in Italian I learned much, much time ago, with my godfather: "È libero questo posto per favore?" ah ah
    I have ancestors from an area known by its Vin Santo as well. It's the Vin Santo di Fregona. :)

    Regarding looking local... As I was saying - I guess you saw my comment before I deleted it, but no problem :) -, my father and brother were in Italy in 2013, in occasion of the 200 years of birth of Verdi and Wagner. The presentations were in Verona and Milano, if my memory serves. Anyway, they commented my father was seen as local, while my brother looked foreign. My father does seem Italian imo (if not Italy, then Balkans). They thought my brother came from North, probably distracted by some traits, unimportant in isolation (as height, very light eyes etc. etc.). I bet people like you would easily identify him as Italian. As I already said, I'm not knowledgeble on this, but he seems to belong to a "Dinaric" type, rather than to a Northern one, as per his skull shape, nose... Anyway...
    My sis, on the other hand, must have the most Italian looking of family, and Italian even for those who don't understand too much about phenotypes. So she fits perhaps even in stereotypes. I still remember an event much time ago in Italian embassy... My mother, sis and I were seated there waiting the beginning of the event, and then an old Italian "mamma" came handing a schedule, looked to us, pointed to her and said: you ARE Italian. je je je


    Funny also the part (Bud) mixed up Garibaldi and General Custer. ah ah
    Fwiw, while Garibaldi, The Hero of Two Worlds, tried to unify Italy, in Brazil he tried the independence of Rio Grande do Sul. je je je Didn't work. Still, he's a regional "hero" there, as one of the three leaders of Farrapos' War (Guerra dos Farrapos), or Revolução Farroupilha (Farroupilha Revolution) - the longest of its kind in Brazilian soil -, together with Bento Gonçalves and David Canabarro, between 1835-1845 (so before Italian immigration). There are in Rio Grande do Sul cities with the names of these three generals, two of them heavily settled by North Italians, as Garibaldi-RS and Bento Gonçalves-RS. Just out of curiosity.

    I guess we were ruining the thread on dairy consumption and height, so here we go... :)

    I agree, but I meant the culinary traditional inspired his belly. lol Just kidding! Love Pavarotti.

    Watched the BBC video, Angela. Simply great!

    As for the other video... Whenever I stay a while without listening Va Pensiero, when I do it again, I shiver. It's really touching, even coming from Andre Rieu. :) No offense. It's not bad, but while he plays an important role in popularizing classicals, I still prefer the traditional, by far. So it's your time to shive: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e1JkhNOcXGo
    And this is for your moments of nostalgia, when missing Italy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OHkri8ZUqOA :)

    Still regarding the dairy consumption and height etc., here's the proof of the role of genetics on physical traits, ah ah: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ey7-KlgD5g

    To finish, I must say I loved the espresso and the capuccino from USA, but their boiled coffee sucks imo. Looks like dirty water, or tea at best.
    coffee.jpg

    Cheers!

    Yes, I only speak standard Italian, like the young woman, and basically the same accent. I understand 90% of the Spezzino and the various Lunegianesi dialects and the mountain Pramzan of my paternal grandparents, but I can't speak them.

    Partly because of my father's influence, but partly as the result of study in language classes here and in Italy, I'm a bit obsessive about Italian. I don't think there's a language in the world which can touch it for beauty. I love Italian poetry for that reason. I love to hear it declaimed aloud, especially by certain masters. I have a treasured series of CDs of Dante, and another one which is a collection of Italian poetry. (It's extremely difficult gramatically, however, so I'm always afraid of making a mistake. I found French and Spanish grammar much easier.)

    The poet laureate of Liguria (The Cinque Terre) and winner of the Nobel Prize in literature.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2CX...XIA_Q&index=12
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tAuwvrRtjJE

    La Pioggia nel Pineto-Gabriele D'Annunzio
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5OsUnxY5mgw

    Se questo e' un uomo-Primo Levi
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_M3d...I8XTPc&index=9

    A tour de force in beautiful Italian (albeit with a rather harsh Tuscan accent) by Roberto Benignini on the nature of poetry. There are English subtitles.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vo9RPtgxSoU

    I could go on forever. :) That's the thing about obsessions.

    The chef and the art historian did a whole series on the food and art of Italy called "Italy Unpacked". I didn't much like the one on Liguria, but some of them were very good. This is the one on the Veneto.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M_Uq3SmydSI&t=78s

    One of the best weeks of my life was the week I spent on my own in a convent guest house on the island of Giudecca.

    I've seen an advertisement for a tour along the canals of all the Palladium houses. I'm sure it's spectacular.

    Making pesto with pinoli. :)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJS9...0zD3b&index=12

    I always get a bit teary when I hear Va Pensiero, but never more so than on this occasion. Tears and brividi...God bless Riccardo Muti for recognizing the emotion of the chorus and the audience, and dropping the professional stance for once and allowing not only an encore, but a participatory one. :)

    It begins at 5:05 when someone shouts "Viva L'Italia" after the chorus had finished.

    "Siamo in casa nostra...la facciamo tutti insieme...a tempo pero!" :) Properly broke my heart. If only my father could have heard it.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPANwyaSlX4&t=525s

    Sometimes I think it should be our anthem, but then I think of the struggle for a country, and I remember occasions like the following, and I think, no, leave it alone. We all know "Va Pensiero" and have it in our hearts anyway.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SNSz0_XJD4s

    My Italian relatives say that American coffee tastes like dirty dishwater. :)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Yes, I only speak standard Italian, like the young woman, and basically the same accent. I understand 90% of the Spezzino and the various Lunegianesi dialects and the mountain Pramzan of my paternal grandparents, but I can't speak them.
    Partly because of my father's influence, but partly as the result of study in language classes here and in Italy, I'm a bit obsessive about Italian. I don't think there's a language in the world which can touch it for beauty. I love Italian poetry for that reason. I love to hear it declaimed aloud, especially by certain masters. I have a treasured series of CDs of Dante, and another one which is a collection of Italian poetry. (It's extremely difficult gramatically, however, so I'm always afraid of making a mistake. I found French and Spanish grammar much easier.)
    The poet laureate of Liguria (The Cinque Terre) and winner of the Nobel Prize in literature.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2CX...XIA_Q&index=12
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tAuwvrRtjJE
    La Pioggia nel Pineto-Gabriele D'Annunzio
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5OsUnxY5mgw
    Se questo e' un uomo-Primo Levi
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_M3d...I8XTPc&index=9
    A tour de force in beautiful Italian (albeit with a rather harsh Tuscan accent) by Roberto Benignini on the nature of poetry. There are English subtitles.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vo9RPtgxSoU
    I could go on forever. :) That's the thing about obsessions.
    The chef and the art historian did a whole series on the food and art of Italy called "Italy Unpacked". I didn't much like the one on Liguria, but some of them were very good. This is the one on the Veneto.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M_Uq3SmydSI&t=78s
    One of the best weeks of my life was the week I spent on my own in a convent guest house on the island of Giudecca.
    I've seen an advertisement for a tour along the canals of all the Palladium houses. I'm sure it's spectacular.
    Making pesto with pinoli. :)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJS9...0zD3b&index=12
    I always get a bit teary when I hear Va Pensiero, but never more so than on this occasion. Tears and brividi...God bless Riccardo Muti for recognizing the emotion of the chorus and the audience, and dropping the professional stance for once and allowing not only an encore, but a participatory one. :)
    It begins at 5:05 when someone shouts "Viva L'Italia" after the chorus had finished.
    "Siamo in casa nostra...la facciamo tutti insieme...a tempo pero!" :) Properly broke my heart. If only my father could have heard it.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPANwyaSlX4&t=525s
    Sometimes I think it should be our anthem, but then I think of the struggle for a country, and I remember occasions like the following, and I think, no, leave it alone. We all know "Va Pensiero" and have it in our hearts anyway.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SNSz0_XJD4s
    My Italian relatives say that American coffee tastes like dirty dishwater. :)
    Thanks again for the videos. I've been learning abt. Italy a lot here with knowledgeble Italians like you. Thanks for that.
    I'll watch them carefully, little by little, as time and circumstances allow. But I already saw the Muti's Va Pensiero. Awe-inspiring. It maked me shive for a second time with a small interval, which is not common . :)

    Regarding Italian language, I remember of when we were in an "interview" for the Italian citizenship, the last stage before the conclusion of the process. In certain moment my father and the interviewer were talking somewhat informally, and then Dante arrived. My father started reciting the beginning of Divina Commedia by heart, in Italian, and then the interviewer followed him. At the end, the interviewer was near to say: "hey, here is your citizenship". Lol

    I agree that the current hymn is in the right place. I like to hear it also in soccer games, a capella or not. It can be breathtaking.
    This one is good:
    https://youtu.be/mT6ApDSKl7s
    Some of these Rugby players really got emotive, je je:
    https://youtu.be/NAZ7iFji2s4

    Italian hymn is one of the most beautiful imo, together with Brazilian, French, and even American, English and Russian. Maybe the German too (also very beautiful).

    As for coffee, a friend Brazilian, living in Seattle, explained me that the "problem" with the American coffee is the way it's ground, the thicker granularity, which generally results in a too weak beverage. So never mind the amount of ground coffee in the filter, supposedly. Anyway, if they like it, who am I to say them how to do it? Still, it seems dirty water to me. :)

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    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Fiorentino doc. :)
    That guy has lived abroad for many years, he wrote a Florentine dictionary for nostalgia, not to forget the vernacular.

    This is a good example of Fiorentino doc/Florentine language. An old man from Florence. The accent is just the most genuine and typical of Florence's historic center.









    This is another good example of Fiorentino Doc, he is a luthier and a violin maker.


    Last edited by Pax Augusta; 21-04-19 at 19:15.

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    @Pax
    Are you Tuscan?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    I find Veneto quite understandable, as is Emiliano, of course.



    I find Venetian more understandable than other northern Italian languages.


    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    It may have been different in the past. In the map they show Emiliano in parts of the Lunigiana, and Tuscan in the rest. It's very locale specific. Pontremoli, imo, is much more Emilian, Zeri a bit Ligurian, and Fivizzano really Tuscan.



    This is an example of dialetto pontremolese, it's uber gallo-italic, even in northern Italy it is increasingly rare to find people who speaks such a strong dialect. The guy is from Pontremoli but is he fully native of Pontremoli? Because one of the surnames sounds Piedmontese, the other is both Lombard and Emilian






    Quote Originally Posted by Regio X View Post
    @Pax
    Are you Tuscan?

    I have grandparents from different areas of Italy, I cover the whole country.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pax Augusta View Post


    I find Venetian more understandable than other northern Italian languages.





    This is an example of dialetto pontremolese, it's uber gallo-italic, even in northern Italy it is increasingly rare to find people who speaks such a strong dialect. The guy is from Pontremoli but is he fully native of Pontremoli? Because one of the surnames sounds Piedmontese, the other is both Lombard and Emilian









    I have grandparents from different areas of Italy, I cover the whole country.
    I posted that video on another thread. From what he says, he grew up in the shadow of the Piagnaro, and he's speaking to a group of Pontremolesi, so this is his dialect, the dialect of Pontremoli, whether or not he might have an ancestor from furthern north.

    This is another example of Pontremolese:



    This is the dialect of the slightly more southern part of the valley, near Liciana Nardi, and my mother's Bagnone.

    Collecchia:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yqfSW48RsV8

    Ninna Nanna:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dtw9...eyz7N8s7oQNp_5

    Filastrocca:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=soKt...eyz7N8s7oQNp_5

    Zucchero sings with Bugelli occassionally during the summers.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFJNtjJlH08


    This is the dialect of Sarzana, just over the border in Liguria.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vuh29plPPts

    Spezzino:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wlN1g09Elfk&t=9s


    As for parmigiano...
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_a8zjY6bBk

    The language of the Veneto is easier to understand than any of them, imo.

    We won't even get into Zenese. :)


    @Regio,

    For your father...
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j57VMotWCx0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k5LC6Cl6Bdw

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    I posted that video on another thread. From what he says, he grew up in the shadow of the Piagnaro, and he's speaking to a group of Pontremolesi, so this is his dialect, the dialect of Pontremoli, whether or not he might have an ancestor from furthern north.

    This is another example of Pontremolese:



    This is the dialect of the slightly more southern part of the valley, near Liciana Nardi, and my mother's Bagnone.

    Collecchia:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yqfSW48RsV8

    Ninna Nanna:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dtw9...eyz7N8s7oQNp_5

    Filastrocca:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=soKt...eyz7N8s7oQNp_5

    Zucchero sings with Bugelli occassionally during the summers.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFJNtjJlH08


    This is the dialect of Sarzana, just over the border in Liguria.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vuh29plPPts

    Spezzino:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wlN1g09Elfk&t=9s


    As for parmigiano...
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_a8zjY6bBk

    The language of the Veneto is easier to understand than any of them, imo.

    We won't even get into Zenese. :)


    @Regio,

    For your father...
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j57VMotWCx0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k5LC6Cl6Bdw
    This just came up on my feed. Just had to share....Partigiano to video of the Gladiator...:)


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    You guys have even more dialects than Greeks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bigsnake49 View Post
    You guys have even more dialects than Greeks.
    Well, that's about 200 kilometers and in the old days, some of it was by mule trains over the Appennines, so....

    It's three different political regions too: Parma (Emilia), Liguria, and Toscana.

    Still, I didn't even include all of them, like the dialect of Fivizzano in east, which is really Tuscan, and the ones to the west of the River Magra, which are much more Ligurian.

    Worse than Greece? :)

    They're all dying out though; only the old people still speak them regularly. The young ones may do it to have a laugh, but not for real life.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Regio X View Post
    Thanks again for the videos. I've been learning abt. Italy a lot here with knowledgeble Italians like you. Thanks for that.
    I'll watch them carefully, little by little, as time and circumstances allow. But I already saw the Muti's Va Pensiero. Awe-inspiring. It maked me shive for a second time with a small interval, which is not common . :)
    Regarding Italian language, I remember of when we were in an "interview" for the Italian citizenship, the last stage before the conclusion of the process. In certain moment my father and the interviewer were talking somewhat informally, and then Dante arrived. My father started reciting the beginning of Divina Commedia by heart, in Italian, and then the interviewer followed him. At the end, the interviewer was near to say: "hey, here is your citizenship". Lol
    I agree that the current hymn is in the right place. I like to hear it also in soccer games, a capella or not. It can be breathtaking.
    This one is good:
    https://youtu.be/mT6ApDSKl7s
    Some of these Rugby players really got emotive, je je:
    https://youtu.be/NAZ7iFji2s4
    Italian hymn is one of the most beautiful imo, together with Brazilian, French, and even American, English and Russian. Maybe the German too (also very beautiful).
    As for coffee, a friend Brazilian, living in Seattle, explained me that the "problem" with the American coffee is the way it's ground, the thicker granularity, which generally results in a too weak beverage. So never mind the amount of ground coffee in the filter, supposedly. Anyway, if they like it, who am I to say them how to do it? Still, it seems dirty water to me. :)
    a translator
    https://glosbe.com/en/vec/today
    Father's Mtdna H95a1
    Grandfather Mtdna T2b24
    Great Grandfather Mtdna T1a1e
    GMother paternal side YDna R1b-S8172
    Mother's YDna R1a-Z282

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    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Both sides both my Dads family come from Campania. Picture includes Grandparents and Great Grandfathers.

    Surname - Location
    My Grandmothers family (Traditional Food: Stuffed Artichoke)
    DiGiacomo - Candida, Avellino / Jamaca Plains, MA
    Baldasaro - "Naples" / Bellows Falls, Vt
    Marino - ? / Bellows Falls, Vt

    Grandfathers Family (Traditional Food: Eggplant)
    Salerno - "Salerno"? / Revere, MA
    Zizza - ? / Revere, MA
    Zetto? - ?
    Rivello? - ?
    Faniglette? - ?
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Quote Originally Posted by New Englander View Post
    Both sides both my Dads family come from Campania. Picture includes Grandparents and Great Grandfathers.

    Surname - Location
    My Grandmothers family (Traditional Food: Stuffed Artichoke)
    DiGiacomo - Candida, Avellino / Jamaca Plains, MA
    Baldasaro - "Naples" / Bellows Falls, Vt
    Marino - ? / Bellows Falls, Vt

    Grandfathers Family (Traditional Food: Eggplant)
    Salerno - "Salerno"? / Revere, MA
    Zizza - ? / Revere, MA
    Zetto? - ?
    Rivello? - ?
    Faniglette? - ?
    Zizza
    http://www.gens.info/italia/it/turis...6#.XL4UtOhKhPY


    Zetto:
    http://www.gens.info/italia/it/turis...6#.XL4UtOhKhPY

    Rivello:
    http://www.gens.info/italia/it/turis...0#.XL4VH-hKhPY

    Faniglette:This may be spelled incorrectly
    http://www.gens.info/italia/it/turis...0#.XL4VqOhKhPY

    There are Ferrarelli in Avellino, but that's pretty different.

    Quite an attractive couple. Her waist is so tiny: it's covered by her bouquet. :)

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    Thanks, Angela.
    Thanks, Zanipolo

    @Pax
    Ok.

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    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    From Oct 2018. Saw it just now.

    "Diaspora" at school:

    https://www.corriere.it/sette/mano-l...a2ca0409.shtml

    ~5.459.000 Venetians... Wow! That's an invaluable (what we could call) "human capital".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Regio X View Post
    From Oct 2018. Saw it just now.

    "Diaspora" at school:

    https://www.corriere.it/sette/mano-l...a2ca0409.shtml

    ~5.459.000 Venetians... Wow! That's an invaluable (what we could call) "human capital".
    It's about time it was taught in Italy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Regio X View Post
    From Oct 2018. Saw it just now.
    "Diaspora" at school:
    https://www.corriere.it/sette/mano-l...a2ca0409.shtml
    ~5.459.000 Venetians... Wow! That's an invaluable (what we could call) "human capital".
    http://www.bassano.eu/Lingua-Veneta-Nomi.htm
    my grandmother, father and 29 year old cousin from Venice proper ( last month visitor ) all used the language
    .
    .
    in link there is Jijo name for Luigi ...............pronounced yee..yo
    my great great grandfather Luigi ( known as Jijo ) below born 1853 with one of his daughters Rosa born 1881 and 2 of her daughters elisabetta b 1910 and Clelia b 1912
    .
    Last edited by zanipolo; 09-05-19 at 20:45.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zanipolo View Post
    http://www.bassano.eu/Lingua-Veneta-Nomi.htm
    my grandmother, father and 29 year old cousin from Venice proper ( last month visitor ) all used the language
    Very nice, Zanipolo.
    Are you related to Sile?

    As for diaspora, I just saw that the Prime Minister of Slovakia, Peter Pellegrini, has Italian roots (as also the Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro - originally Bolzonaro, from RO/PD):
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Pellegrini
    (so Peter's great-grandfather, Leopoldo Pellegrini)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Regio X View Post
    Very nice, Zanipolo.
    Are you related to Sile?
    As for diaspora, I just saw that the Prime Minister of Slovakia, Peter Pellegrini, has Italian roots (as also the Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro - originally Bolzonaro, from RO/PD):
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Pellegrini
    (so Peter's great-grandfather, Leopoldo Pellegrini)
    Sile is my father .................his account does not work anymore after he had to reinstall windows 10
    I let him use my account sometimes, but he is not allowed to vote.
    He is also looking after his 2 grandsons ( my brothers children ), sometimes.....so he does not have much time anymore

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    Quote Originally Posted by zanipolo View Post
    Sile is my father .................his account does not work anymore after he had to reinstall windows 10
    I let him use my account sometimes, but he is not allowed to vote.
    He is also looking after his 2 grandsons ( my brothers children ), sometimes.....so he does not have much time anymore
    Cool. So nice to "meet" you. :)
    Send Sile my best regards.
    Cheers

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    Quote Originally Posted by Regio X View Post
    Cool. So nice to "meet" you. :)
    Send Sile my best regards.
    Cheers
    I will
    he might start a new account later on

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