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Thread: Italians of the Diaspora

  1. #76
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    I am an Italian-Anglo-Irish mix. Both of my paternal grandparents were born in Caria di Drapia, a small farming village on the slopes of Monte Poro, overlooking the Tyrrhenian Sea, with Stromboli in the distance. Down until the end of the Napoleonic era the area was dominated & ruled by the noble families of Tropea, a "free city" perhaps best conceived as miniature Venice of the South.

    So far as I know my ancestors lived as small freeholders on the Poro dating back at least until 1400, forming marriages with other families of the "Casali di Tropea." An agricultural crisis in the early 19th century left them desperate, however, and for a few generations they participated in the settlement of San Ferdinando, which involved draining malarial swamps to create the rich citrus groves that exist today, before returning to Caria by century's end. See http://www.tropeamagazine.it/sanferdinando

    In the 1920s my grandfather emigrated to Ambler, Pennsylvania, to work at Keasbey & Mattison, the world's largest asbestos manufacturer, discussed at length by Gay Talese in "Unto the Sons."

    I am now applying for Italian citizenship via my father's mother, who never naturalized. The process is expected to take 2.5 years, which should be enough time for me to acquire a reasonable knowledge of the language. I would like to return to Italy and start a family (assuming I am not too old, a sad biological possibility), hopefully in the city of Reggio.

    On Drapia in general (in Italian) =


    Brattiro circa 1960s =


    Sagra della 'Nduja -- Spilinga 1986


    The Coast of the Gods 1983 =


    The Aura of the Work of Art =

  2. #77
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    Very nice.

    Have you ever had "Nduja? It's delicious, but very hot. American chefs have recently caught on to it. In fact, it was just recently featured on a video at Bon Appetit where they put it on pizza. Jamie Oliver has a recipe for pasta using it.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=64mj4oR-0yw




    I'm not a big fan of this recipe, however. English made "Nduja? It looks all wrong. Plus, you have to blanch the cime di rapa for a few minutes before frying, and parmigiano is the WRONG cheese for something this spicy.


    Non si fa il proprio dovere perchè qualcuno ci dica grazie, lo si fa per principio, per se stessi, per la propria dignità. Oriana Fallaci

  3. #78
    Dominique_NUit Achievements:
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Have you ever had "Nduja?
    Alienated and declasse person that I am, existing on the fringes of society, I of course just happen to manage an Italian restaurant. We used to have a retail counter, manned by a Sardinian gentleman trained in the art of slicing & arranging tissue-thin prosciutto, and 'nduja was among the products on offer. Unfortunately the retail counter was not a viable proposition, very hard to compete with the Eataly's and Citarella's of the world, and once the Sardinian abruptly quit in a tizzy, the counter lost its raison d'etat.

    However, in conducting online genealogical research (in truth "hopping" onto other people's research), I discovered that my family inter-married several times in the 1800s with the Barbalace clan, whose patriarch Pasquale Barbalace, of the village of Carciadi (separated by a moat from Spilinga), was the very first settler of San Ferdinando. Accordingly, I googled Barbalace to see what I could learn of them, and this is what I discovered = https://njmonthly.com/articles/eat-d...er-shop-nduja/

  4. #79
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    Wow. That makes you alienated and declasse? In New York????

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